News Briefs

Rare Disease Institute director named to Global Commission to End the Diagnostic Odyssey for Children

Marshall Summar, M.D., director of the Children’s National Rare Disease Institute (CNRDI), has been named to the Global Commission to End the Diagnostic Odyssey for Children.

Children’s National Health System has announced that Marshall Summar, M.D., director of the Children’s National Rare Disease Institute (CNRDI), has been named to the Global Commission to End the Diagnostic Odyssey for Children (“the Global Commission”), an alliance dedicated to shortening the multi-year journey that rare disease patients and families endure on the road to diagnosis.

Established in partnership with Shire, Microsoft and EURORDIS, the Global Commission is comprised of a multi-disciplinary team of global experts that have the commitment, creativity and technological expertise required to make a substantial difference in the lives of the millions of children living with a rare disorder.

“Providing more help to children born with rare genetic diseases continues to be one of the core challenges of 21st century medicine,” says Dr. Summar, who notes that patients typically visit up to eight doctors and often receive two or three misdiagnoses along the way. “Even upon diagnosis, patients are hindered by scarce treatment options and approximately a third of patients die before their fifth birthday. We are committed to changing this trend at the CNRDI and are excited to have the opportunity to share our expertise with this alliance on a global stage.”

The Global Commission is focused on developing an actionable roadmap for the field of rare disease that offers recommendations to address core challenges that prevent timely diagnosis for rare disease patients, including improving physicians’ ability to identify and diagnose rare disorders, empowering patients to take an active role in their healthcare and providing high-level policy guidance to help rare disease patients achieve better health outcomes.

Beginning its work in 2018, the Global Commission expects to publish a roadmap that encapsulates the collective findings in early 2019. Over the course of the next year, the alliance will gather input from patients, families and other experts to gain key insights and develop solutions to shorten the diagnostic odyssey.

In the United States, it is estimated that one in 10 people has a rare disease – approximately 80 percent of which are genetically based. Additionally, the National Institutes of Health reports that more than 80 percent are childhood diseases and more than 25 percent of children admitted to pediatric hospitals have a rare disease.

Larry D'Angelo SAMH award

Larry D’Angelo, M.D., M.P.H., receives the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine’s 2018 Outstanding Achievement Award

Larry D'Angelo SAMH award

Larry D’Angelo, M.D., M.P.H., emeritus Chief of the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine  at Children’s National Health System is being honored by the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM) with their most prestigious award, the 2018 Outstanding Achievement in Adolescent Health and Medicine.

The award acknowledges Dr. D’Angelo’s career-long dedication to adolescents and adolescent health care. Dr. D’Angelo is a pioneer in the care of and research for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients, spending the past 35 years working to treat youth and adults with HIV/AIDS in the Washington area. As part of his work, Dr. D’Angelo founded and directed the Burgess Clinic for HIV-infected adolescents at Children’s National, the Youth Pride Clinic for LGBTQ health at Children’s National and the community-based organization, Metro TeenAIDS, currently part of the Whitman Walker Clinic.

Dr. D’Angelo was presented the award on March 15, 2018 at the SAHM’s Annual Meeting in Seattle.

“This is a tremendous honor that serves to validate not me and my work, but the collective efforts of everyone I’ve worked with here at Children’s National. I couldn’t have achieved anything without those in my Division nor without my colleagues across the institution.” Dr. D’Angelo says.

Dr. D’Angelo, an internationally recognized expert in adolescents and adolescent health care, is also emeritus executive director for The Diana L. and Stephen A. Goldberg Center for Community Pediatric Health and a senior scientist with the District of Columbia Center for AIDS Research’s Clinical and Population Sciences Core.  His academic appointments include professor Pediatrics, Medicine, Epidemiology, and Prevention and Community Health at The George Washington University.

Millenial Panel at Population Strategies for Childrens Health Summit

Population health and value based care discussed at the Population Strategies for Children’s Health Summit

With sponsorship from Cerner Corporation, Children’s National held the first Population Strategies for Children’s Health (PSCH) event on February 19 – 20, 2018 at The Westin City Center in Washington, D.C. Speakers and attendees gathered from around the country to discuss pediatric population health and the transition to value based care.

PSCH opened with an insightful presentation from Ellen-Marie Whelan Ph.D., CRNP, FAAN, chief population health officer at the CMS Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services. Her presentation, “Medicaid Transformation to Value Based Care,” explored an incentivized health care delivery system reform that will result in better care, smarter spending and healthier people.

Sean Gleeson, M.D., M.B.A., president of Partners for Kids at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, spoke about the mechanics of Partners for Kids and the population health strategies they choose to implement. These strategies require an entire enterprise to be engaged and they must be an intentional component of each healthcare organization. Dr. Gleeson put it simply that population health turns healthcare “right side up” by tying financial incentives to positive value outcomes versus upside down when health organizations make more money when kids are sicker.

A presentation from William Feaster, M.D., M.B.A., chief medical information officer at CHOC Children’s Hospital, and Brian Jacobs, M.D., vice president, chief medical information officer and chief information officer at Children’s National Health System, delved into implementing condition-specific pediatric registries. They highlighted that it’s necessary to integrate registries and workflows into the daily work of clinicians and make them actionable to encourage engagement.

Another highlight of the conference was the millennial panel “The Current and Future State of Health Care from a Consumer’s Perspective.” The panel consisted of Janice Bitetti, a physician and mother of a 10-year-old with Type 1 diabetes; Jonathan Morris, a 15-year-old Type 1 Diabetes patient at Children’s National; and moderator Emily Webber, M.D., FAAP, chief medical information officer at Riley Children’s Hospital. Panel participants shared their take on the current state of Type 1 diabetes care, and the way millennials interact with healthcare. Both Jonathan and Janice agreed that the intensive nature of Type 1 diabetes care puts many families who don’t have the time, resources and initiative that they do in a very difficult place.

Other speakers throughout the two day event explored topics including population health strategies to reduce child health disparities, the role of telehealth in population health, care coordination and coaching to health, and technology in population health.

Millenial Panel at Population Strategies for Childrens Health Summit

Brian Jacobs, M.D. introduces the Millennial Panel at the Population Strategies for Children’s Health Summit.

Anthony Sandler

Anthony Sandler, M.D., Named Director of Sheikh Zayed Institute

Anthony Sandler

Children’s National Health System is pleased to announce that Anthony Sandler, M.D., current senior vice president and surgeon-in-chief of the Joseph E. Robert Jr. Center for Surgical Care at Children’s National, will now additionally assume the title of director, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation. He will succeed Peter Kim, M.D., the founding vice president of the Sheikh Zayed Institute, who is leaving to pursue other career opportunities after seven years at the helm of our surgical innovation center.

Dr. Sandler will be in a unique position, leading both in the research and clinical enterprises of Children’s National and will help to forge a stronger link between them, especially in the surgical subspecialties.

Internationally known for his work on childhood solid tumors and operative repair of congenital anomalies, Dr. Sandler is the Diane and Norman Bernstein Chair in Pediatric Surgery and is a professor of surgery and pediatrics at the George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences. He is currently on the Board of Examiners for the Pediatric Surgery Qualifying Examination and has served on multiple committees for the American Pediatric Surgical Association and for the Children’s Oncology Group.

Dr. Sandler’s research interests focus on solid tumors of childhood and he’s presently studying tumor immunology and investigating immunotherapeutic vaccine strategies. He has co-developed a surgical polymer sealant that is R01 funded by the National Institutes of Health and is currently in pre-clinical trials. Dr. Sandler has over 120 peer-reviewed publications in clinical and scientific medical journals.

Zeroing in on Zero Harm

Zeroing in on zero harm: Innovative quality and safety initiatives from Children’s National experts

Zeroing in on Zero Harm

Leaders at Children’s National Health System recently showcased innovative quality and safety initiatives on a national stage at the Children’s Hospital Association’s 2018 Quality and Safety in Children’s Health Conference.

Leaders at Children’s National Health System recently showcased innovative quality and safety initiatives on a national stage at the Children’s Hospital Association’s 2018 Quality and Safety in Children’s Health Conference. While collaborating with other medical professionals in the field, the team made an impact by sharing key projects implemented at Children’s National to enhance patient care and reduce harm, including:

    • Safety in Numbers: Driving 10,000 Good Catches – Presented by Rahul Shah, M.D., vice president, chief quality and safety officer, and Rebecca Cady, Esq, BSN, vice president, chief risk officer: Recognizing barriers to reporting safety events, Children’s National embarked upon a three-year corporate goal to double the number of safety event reports, ultimately leading to reduction of preventable harm. By promoting staff accountability and using incentives to drive reporting, incident reports more than doubled in a three-year time frame.
    • Moving from Disjointed Spreadsheets to a Real-Time Data Management System – Presented by Evan Hochberg, R.N., patient safety consultant, and Neil Bhattarai, C.S.T., process improvement consultant: Tracking hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) requires robust data capabilities, which is why Children’s National sought to improve its HAC data system with increased efficiencies and reduced delays in how staff presented data to the hospital. The team recognized opportunities to improve the management of HAC data, leading to the finding that increased real-time awareness of harm events while utilizing existing infrastructure can accelerate harm reduction.
    • Improving the Surgical Experience for Children with Autism – Presented by Terry Spearman, C.C.L.S., manager of child life services: Staff at Children’s National found that many patients with autism entering the operating room needed special support to make it through pre-op, complicating their path toward surgery and causing frustration for patients, families and the care team. The team solved this challenge by creating a system to identify patients before they arrived for surgery, which allowed staff to create a safe passage plan for each patient and to achieve better care coordination with all care team members. Titled “Help Me Keep Calm,” the hospital’s program provides a more peaceful and individualized experience for both the patient and his or her family.
    • IMPACT Session: Enhancing Psychological Safety to Improve the Safety Climate – Presented by Rahul Shah, M.D., vice president, chief quality and safety officer; Evan Hochberg, R.N., patient safety consultant; and Kathryn Jacobsen, R.N., director of patient safety: Psychological safety around event reporting is a crucial element of safety culture and the ability to voice concerns without reprisal leads to the ideal safe environment.

Horizon Pharma gifts $3M to establish Horizon Pharma Clinical Care Endowment at Children’s National Rare Disease Institute

“Patients and families with rare conditions deserve to be treated in a place with the medical knowledge to provide quick, clear answers and the expert care they need,” says Marshall Summar, M.D., director of the CNRDI.

Children’s National Health System and Horizon Pharma plc are pleased to announce the creation of the Horizon Pharma Clinical Care Endowment, the first clinical team endowment at the Children’s National Rare Disease Institute (CNRDI). The endowment is made possible by a generous six-year, $3 million commitment from Horizon Pharma USA, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Horizon Pharma plc –a biopharmaceutical company dedicated to improving the lives of people living with rare diseases.

“Patients and families with rare conditions deserve to be treated in a place with the medical knowledge to provide quick, clear answers and the expert care they need,” says Marshall Summar, M.D. , director of the CNRDI.  “We are grateful for Horizon and their support of our mission to make the Children’s National Rare Disease Institute that place. This endowment will support a dedicated team that can provide optimal, comprehensive care to more patients and ensure that families have a trusted source for all aspects of their health care.”

The Horizon Pharma Clinical Care Endowment will generate revenue annually, providing stable support for an expert care team at the CNRDI. Each team will be comprised of a clinical geneticist and support team members – such as genetic counselors, nutritionists and social workers – all specializing in the care of children with rare disease.

The long-term support provided by the Horizon Pharma Clinical Care Endowment will give the CNRDI a firm foundation for treating patients earlier, more consistently and over the course of their lifetime. Horizon’s commitment marks the first donor-funded endowment at the CNRDI.

Currently, it is estimated that one in 10 Americans has a rare disease – approximately 80 percent of which are genetically based. Additionally, the NIH reports that more than 80 percent are childhood diseases, and more than 25 percent of children admitted to pediatric hospitals have a rare disease.

The CNRDI is a first-of-its-kind center focused exclusively on advancing the care and treatment of children and adults with rare genetic diseases. It is the first National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Center of Excellence and aims to provide a medical home for patients and families seeking the most advanced care and expertise for rare genetic conditions that remain largely unknown to the general medical community.

Anthony Sandler

Treatment of neuroblastoma with immunotherapy and vaccine combination shows promise

Anthony Sandler

“Treatment options like these that help the body use its own immune system to fight off cancer are incredibly promising, and we look forward to continuing this work to understand how we can best help our patients and their families,” said Anthony Sandler, M.D.

Despite being the most common extracranial solid tumor found in children and having multiple modes of therapy, neuroblastoma continues to carry a poor prognosis. However, a recent cutting-edge pre-clinical study, PD-L1 checkpoint inhibition and anti-CTLA-4 whole tumor cell vaccination counter adaptive immune resistance: A mouse neuroblastoma model that mimics human disease, published in PLOS Medicine shows the first signs of success in treating high-risk neuroblastoma, a promising step not only for neuroblastoma patients, but potentially for other types of cancer and solid tumors as well. While the research was conducted on mouse models and is in the early stages, the lead author of the study, Anthony Sandler, M.D., senior vice president and surgeon-in-chief of the Joseph E. Robert, Jr., Center for Surgical Care at Children’s National, believes these findings are an encouraging development for the field.

The treatment method combines a novel personalized vaccine and a combination of drugs that target checkpoint inhibitors enabling the immune system to identify and kill cancer cells. When these checkpoints are blocked, it’s similar to taking the brakes off the immune system so that the body’s T cells can be primed by the vaccine, identify the tumor and allow for targeted tumor cell killing. The vaccine then brings in reinforcements to double down on the attack, helping to eradicate the tumor. The vaccine could also be used as a way to prevent recurrence of disease. After a patient has received the vaccine, the T cells would live in the body, remembering the tumor cells, and attack reemerging cancer in a similar way that a flu vaccine helps fight off the flu virus.

“Treatment options like these that help the body use its own immune system to fight off cancer are incredibly promising, and we look forward to continuing this work to understand how we can best help our patients and their families,” said Dr. Sandler.

Roger Packer, MD

New guidelines advance treatment approach for children with low-grade gliomas

Roger Packer, MD

“We believe our understanding of LGGs combined with novel therapies will soon lead to a new standard of care for children,” says Roger J. Packer, M.D. “We are optimistic about the future for patients with this disease.”

Patients with low-grade gliomas (LGGs) will benefit from new recommendations from a group led by Roger J. Packer, M.D., senior vice president for the Center for Neuroscience and Behavioral Medicine, as well as clinicians, researchers and industry leaders from around the world, that were recently published in Neuro-Oncology. The new framework for LGGs will significantly advance the future of care for patients with these complex diseases and set a new path to expedite the translation of scientific advances into clinical care. The recommendations build on a treatment approach developed more than 25 years ago by Dr. Packer and his colleagues that revolutionized care for LGGs.

LGGs are both common and complicated, and one treatment approach does not work for all cases. Until now, there has not been a standardized way to categories the tumors to prescribe more effective and personalized treatment options. The new guidelines will provide clinicians with one mutually agreed upon set of recommendations to further advance the field and better diagnose and treat patients with LGGs.

Topics within the framework include:

  • Implications of the growing understanding of genomics underlying these tumors and how to apply to clinical practice
  • The need for more and better model systems to assess the likely benefits of new treatments for LGGs before exposing patients to new therapy
  • A review and assessment of what is needed for the design of future clinical trials
  • Evaluation of current therapies and the steps needed to expedite molecularly targeted therapy into late-stage clinical trials, including in those newly diagnosed with the disease so as to avoid less-personalized chemotherapy or radiotherapy

“We believe our understanding of LGGs combined with novel therapies will soon lead to a new standard of care for children,” says Dr. Packer.  “We are optimistic about the future for patients with this disease.”

Ricardo Munoz

Ricardo Muñoz, M.D., joins Children’s National as Chief of Cardiac Critical Care Medicine, Executive Director of Telemedicine and Co-Director of Heart Institute

Ricardo Munoz

Children’s National Health System is pleased to announce Ricardo Muñoz, M.D., as chief of the Division of Cardiac Critical Care Medicine and co-director of the Children’s National Heart Institute. Dr. Muñoz also will serve as the executive director of Telemedicine Services at Children’s National, working to leverage advances in technology to improve access to health care for underserved communities and developing nations.

Within the new division of Cardiac Critical Care Medicine, Dr. Muñoz will oversee the work of a multidisciplinary team, including critical care nurse practitioners and nurses, respiratory and physical therapists, nutritionists, social workers and pharmacists, in addition to a medical staff with one of the highest rates of double-boarded specialists in cardiology and critical care.

“We are honored to welcome Dr. Ricardo Muñoz to Children’s National,” says David Wessel, M.D., executive vice president and chief medical officer of Hospital and Specialty Services. “He is a pioneer and innovator in the fields of cardiac critical care and telemedicine and will undoubtedly provide a huge benefit to our patients and their families along with our cardiac critical care and telemedicine teams.”

Dr. Muñoz comes to Children’s National from Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC. During his 15-year tenure there, he established the cardiac intensive care unit and co-led the Heart Center in a multidisciplinary effort to achieve some of the best outcomes in the nation. He also is credited with pioneering telemedicine for pediatric critical care, providing nearly 4,000 consultations globally.

“Children’s National has a longstanding reputation of excellence in cardiac critical care, and I am pleased to be able to join the team in our nation’s capital to not only deliver top-quality care to patients regionally, but also around the world,” says Dr. Muñoz. “The early identification and treatment of pediatric congenital heart disease patients has made rapid improvements in recent decades, but there is a shortage of intensivists to care for these children during what is often a complex recovery course.”

Dr. Muñoz attended medical school at the Universidad del Norte, Barranquilla, Colombia, and completed his residency in pediatrics at the Hospital Militar Central, Bógota, Colombia. He continued his training as a general pediatrics and pediatric critical care fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital, and as a pediatric cardiology fellow at Boston Children’s Hospital. He then joined the faculty at Harvard Medical School and served as an attending physician in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit at Boston Children’s.

Dr. Muñoz is board certified in pediatrics, pediatric critical care and in pediatric cardiology. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Critical Care Medicine and the American College of Cardiology. Additionally, he is the primary editor and co-author of multiple textbooks and award-winning handbooks in pediatric cardiac intensive care, including Spanish language editions.

Benjamin Martin and Anjna Melwani

Children’s National orthopaedic surgery experts prepare for the 2018 POSNA annual meeting

The Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) will hold its 2018 annual meeting May 9-12, 2018 in Austin, TX. POSNA is dedicated to improving the care of children with musculoskeletal disorders through education, research and advocacy. Along with 1,400 othopeadic surgeons, physicians and other health care professionals, experts from Children’s National will attend and participate in the following activities:

  • Matthew Oetgen, M.D., M.B.A., Division Chief of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, along with hospitalists Rita Fleming, M.D., and Anjna Melwani, M.D., will give a presentation on quality, safety and value titled, “Hospitalist co-management of pediatric orthopedic patients improves outcomes and quality processes.”
  • Danielle Putur, M.D., Miguel Pelton, M.D., Niharika Patel, M.P.H., and Emily Niu, M.D., will present a poster titled, “ACL growth with age in the skeletally immature: an MRI study.”
  • Benjamin Martin, M.D., will present a poster titled, “The effectiveness of intrathecal morphine compared to oral methadone for postoperative pain control after posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.”
Benjamin Martin, M.D., and Anjna Melwani, M.D., are among the experts from Children’s National who will be presenting at the POSNA annual meeting.

Benjamin Martin, M.D., and Anjna Melwani, M.D., are among the experts from Children’s National who will be presenting at the POSNA annual meeting.

As a newly elected POSNA board member, Dr. Oetgen will also preside over the clinical award session, as well as chair the Spine Subspecialty Day, which is designed to update surgeons on current, cutting-edge topics and provide tips and tricks on a range of issues related to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and moderate a discussion at this year’s meeting.

Additionally, Benjamin Martin, M.D., recently won the 2017 POSNA Clinical Trials Planning Grant – “The Treatment of Pediatric Diaphyseal Femur Fractures: A Clinical Trials Planning Grant.”

Visit the POSNA website to find out more information on this year’s conference.

Doctors-working-with-Digital-Tablet

New network will advance treatments for children

Doctors-working-with-Digital-Tablet

Three leaders from Children’s National Health System are among the investigators of a new FDA-funded program created to launch a global clinical trials network. The initial $1 million grant from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) establishes a network among the Institute for Advanced Clinical Trials for Children (I-ACT for Children), the National Capital Consortium for Pediatric Device Innovation (NCC-PDI) (affiliated with Children’s National), PEDSnet, the James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence and the Critical Path Institute, to address the unmet medical needs of children by improving quality and efficiency in developing innovative pediatric drugs and devices.

Along with the fiscal 2017 funds, there is a potential for $1 million in funding each year for an additional four years to I-ACT for Children, contingent on annual appropriations and the availability of funding. I-ACT for Children is a new independent, nonprofit organization that works to improve the planning and completion of pediatric clinical trials. PEDSnet and the Anderson Center will serve as the network’s data and learning core, while the Critical Path Institute will serve as the regulatory science core and NCC-PDI will serve as the medical device core.

From Children’s National, the investigators include: Peter Kim, M.D., Ph.D., vice president of the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation; Kolaleh Eskandanian, Ph.D., executive director of the Sheikh Zayed Institute and NCC-PDI and Johannes van den Anker, M.D., Ph.D., division chief of Clinical Pharmacology and vice chair of Experimental Therapeutics.

“We are pleased that this grant addresses innovative reengineering of the pediatric device trials system,” says Eskandanian. “In contrast with drug trials, device trials are generally less optimally understood in academic medical centers and clinical sites.”

She explains that children have medical device needs that are considerably different from adults. Designing devices for children requires considerations such as growth and development, anatomical and physiological differences. Often, the lack of available devices for children forces clinicians to use an adult device off-label or to improvise. Off-label use may be the only option, but such use can bring risks of serious adverse events that could be avoided if there were more FDA–approved pediatric devices.

“Thanks to partnership with I-ACT we will be able to address the pressing need to improve clinical trials and post-market monitoring of pediatric devices,” says Eskandanian.

Leading the network as principal investigator is Edward Connor, M.D., president of I-ACT for Children and an emeritus professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology, Immunology, and Tropical Medicine at George Washington University School of Medicine and Children’s National.

Work has been initiated to integrate network components and engage public and private shareholders. Next steps include selecting priority projects for implementation in 2018 and beyond, and scaling the network in North America and abroad.

Funding for this work was made possible, in part, by the Food and Drug Administration through grant 1 U18 FD 006297. Views expressed in written materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does any mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organization imply endorsement by the United States Government.

Electronic medical record on tablet

Children’s National submissions make hackathon finals

Electronic medical record on tablet

This April, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute at Children’s National (CTSI-CN) and The George Washington University (GW) will hold their 2nd Annual Medical and Health App Development Workshop. Of the 10 application (app) ideas selected for further development at the hackathon workshop, five were submitted by clinicians and researchers from Children’s National.

The purpose of the half-day hackathon is to develop the requirements and prototype user interface for 10 medical software applications that were selected from ideas submitted late in 2017. While idea submissions were not restricted, the sponsors suggested that they lead to useful medical software applications.

The following five app ideas from Children’s National were selected for the workshop:

  • A patient/parent decision tool that could use a series of questions to determine if the patient should go to the Emergency Department or to their primary care provider; submitted by Sephora Morrison, M.D., and Ankoor Shah, M.D.
  • The Online Treatment Recovery Assistance for Concussion in Kids (OnTRACK) smartphone application could guide children/adolescents and their families in the treatment of their concussion in concert with their health care provider; submitted by Gerard Gioia, Ph.D.
  • A genetic counseling app that would provide a reputable, easily accessible bank of counseling videos for a variety of topics, from genetic testing to rare disorders; submitted by Debra Regier, M.D.
  • An app that would allow the Children’s National Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes Program team to communicate securely and efficiently with diabetes patients; submitted by Cynthia Medford, R.N., and Kannan Kasturi, M.D.
  • An app that would provide specific evidence-based guidance for medical providers considering PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) for HIV prevention; submitted by Kyzwana Caves, M.D.

Kevin Cleary, Ph.D., technical director of the Bioengineering Initiative at Children’s National Health System, and Sean Cleary, Ph.D., M.P.H., associate professor in epidemiology and biostatistics at GW, created the hackathon to provide an interactive learning experience for people interested in developing medical and health software applications.

The workshop, which will be held on April 13, 2018, will start with short talks from experts on human factors engineering and the regulatory environment for medical and health apps. Attendees will then divide into small groups to brainstorm requirements and user interfaces for the 10 app ideas. After each group presents their concepts to all the participants, the judges will pick the winning app/group. The idea originator will receive up to $10,000 of voucher funding for their prototype development.

Nobuyuki Ishibashi

Children’s receives NIH grant to study use of stem cells in healing CHD brain damage

Nobuyuki Ishibashi

“Bone marrow stem cells are used widely for stroke patients, for heart attack patients and for those with developmental diseases,” explains Nobuyuki Ishibashi, M.D. “But they’ve never been used to treat the brains of infants with congenital heart disease. That’s why we are trying to understand how well this system might work for our patient population.”

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded researchers at Children’s National Health System $2.6 million to expand their studies into whether human stem cells could someday treat and even reverse neurological damage in infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD).

Researchers estimate that 1.3 million infants are born each year with CHD, making it the most common major birth defect. Over the past 30 years, advances in medical technology and surgical practices have dramatically decreased the percentage of infants who die from CHD – from a staggering rate of nearly 100 percent just a few decades ago to the current mortality rate of less than 10 percent.

The increased survival rate comes with new challenges: Children with complex CHD are increasingly diagnosed with significant neurodevelopmental delay or impairment. Clinical studies demonstrate that CHD can reduce oxygen delivery to the brain, a condition known as hypoxia, which can severely impair brain development in fetuses and newborns whose brains are developing rapidly.

Nobuyuki Ishibashi, M.D., the study’s lead investigator with the Center for Neuroscience Research and director of the Cardiac Surgery Research Laboratory at Children’s National, proposes transfusing human stem cells in experimental models through the cardio-pulmonary bypass machine used during cardiac surgery.

“These cells can then identify the injury sites,” says Dr. Ishibashi. “Once these cells arrive at the injury site, they communicate with endogenous tissues, taking on the abilities of the damaged neurons or glia cells they are replacing.”

“Bone marrow stem cells are used widely for stroke patients, for heart attack patients and for those with developmental diseases,” adds Dr. Ishibashi. “But they’ve never been used to treat the brains of infants with congenital heart disease. That’s why we are trying to understand how well this system might work for our patient population.”

Dr. Ishibashi says the research team will focus on three areas during their four-year study – whether the stem cells:

  • Reduce neurological inflammation,
  • Reverse or halt injury to the brain’s white matter and
  • Help promote neurogenesis in the subventricular zone, the largest niche in the brain for creating the neural stem/progenitor cells leading to cortical growth in the developing brain.

At the conclusion of the research study, Dr. Ishibashi says the hope is to develop robust data so that someday an effective treatment will be available and lasting neurological damage in infants with congenital heart disease will become a thing of the past.

ER attending clinician named Presidential Leadership Scholar

Children’s Pediatric Emergency Medicine Attending Lenore Jarvis M.D., M.Ed., FAAP, has been accepted to the fourth annual class of 2018 Presidential Leadership Scholars (PLS).  PLS serves as a catalyst for a diverse network of leaders brought together to collaborate and make a difference in the world as they learn about leadership through the lens of the presidential experiences of George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush and Lyndon B. Johnson.

The incoming scholars were selected after a rigorous application and review process. Scholars were selected based on their leadership growth potential and the strength of their personal leadership projects aimed at improving the civic or social good by addressing a problem or need in a community, profession or organization.

Scholars will travel to each participating presidential center to learn from former presidents, key former administration officials and leading academics. They will study and put into practice varying approaches to leadership, develop a network of peers and exchange ideas with mentors and others who can help them make an impact in their communities. The program kicks off in Washington on Feb. 6, 2018.

“I am deeply honored to have been selected for this prestigious program,” Dr. Jarvis says. “I look forward to continuing to work collaboratively with social workers and community stakeholders to provide interventions to mothers who screen positive for postpartum depression more expeditiously. We know from our research in the pediatric emergency department that postpartum depression is reported by about one in four mothers. Providing real-time interventions can help improve the quality of care we provide new mothers and their infants.”

Scoliosis X-ray image

Improved procedures, reduced harm: Moving the needle on spinal fusion

Scoliosis X-ray image

In many cases of pediatric scoliosis, a surgical posterior spinal fusion – a life-changing yet complicated process – is needed to straighten the spine.

As part of its ongoing transition to value-based care, Children’s National is constantly reevaluating systems and processes across specialties and proactively seeking ways to deliver the highest quality care. This includes treatments for everything from the rarest of diseases to more frequent conditions, such as pediatric scoliosis.

In many cases of pediatric scoliosis, a surgical posterior spinal fusion – a life-changing yet complicated process – is needed to straighten the spine. The procedure involves permanently fusing bones over the curved part of the spine and requires expert coordination among physicians, nurses and therapists. To improve the procedure and make it as safe and efficient as possible, experts at Children’s National developed a first-of-its-kind pediatric spinal fusion surgical home, an innovative, family-centered approach that is making a real impact.

Prior to this initiative, patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion to treat scoliosis spent multiple days across multiple units in the hospital. Thanks to a comprehensive care pathway with input from all care providers treating these patients, overall recovery time has been reduced as well as days in the hospital. This in turn decreased the costs to both the families and Children’s National.

In the first six months of implementation, changes included decreasing the average length of stay from approximately five days to three and a half days, decreased blood transfusion rate and less use of opioid pain medications. Each of these pieces directly contributes to the safety of a child and decreased costs across the board. Ultimately, implementing cutting-edge practices like these brings the organization closer to zero harm and helps move the needle on patient care across the industry.

drawing of neurons

Children’s National to host 28th Annual Pediatric Neurology Update

drawing of neurons

The Children’s National Health System Center for Neuroscience and Behavioral Medicine is proud to host the 28th Annual Pediatric Neurology Update course.

This year’s course will be focused on new understandings, molecular pathogenesis, novel treatment and outcomes of infections which affect the central nervous system; as well as the often indistinct boundaries between CNS infections and neuro immunologic diseases of the nervous system.

We invite you to join us for presentations from renowned experts in the field in this full-day, CME accredited event on May 3, 2018 at the Children’s National main campus in Washington, D.C.

For more information and to register, visit ChildrensNational.org/NeurologyUpdate.

Allistair Abraham

Q&A with leading blood and marrow transplantation specialist

Allistair Abraham

Children’s National Health System is proud to be the home of some of the world’s leading hematology experts, including Allistair Abraham, M.D., blood and marrow transplantation specialist within the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, who was recently selected to participate in the American Society of Hematology-Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program (ASH-AMFDP). Designed to increase the number of underrepresented minority scholars in the field of hematology, the ASH-AMFDP has awarded Dr. Abraham $420,000 that includes an annual stipend and research grant over the next four years. Here, Dr. Abraham tells us more about his research and what it means for the future of patients with sickle cell disease.

Q: What does this award mean to you?
A: This award comes at a critical time in my early career as I learn how to become an independent grant-funded researcher. It gives me an opportunity to dedicate 70 percent of my time to research for the next four years, during which I will hone my research skills and have access to highly accomplished mentors at Children’s National and from the ASH-AMFDP faculty.

Q: Your research for this grant focuses on improving curative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell disease. Why do they need to be improved?

A: Sickle cell disease causes significant health problems for children, which can worsen as they become adults, and even shorten their lifespan. Curative therapies to date are limited for many patients since most do not have a suitably matched donor for a curative bone marrow transplant. Many of us in the field hope we can provide a safe option for as many patients as possible so they can be cured in childhood and not have to face the negative impacts of the disease as they grow older.

Q: You will also be evaluating virus-specific T-cell (VST) recovery after transplantation. What will this mean for patients?

A: As we explore more transplant donor options such as unrelated donors and mismatched family donors, we have observed delayed immune system recovery. Viral infections are particularly problematic, as they can be life-threatening and respond poorly to available medications. Ultimately, a recovered immune system would address the infection problem. We hope to generate immune cells that are protective against viruses from the transplant donor and give them to patients as part of their transplant procedure.

Q: How do you envision your research improving the future of treatment for sickle cell patients?

A: My hope is that we get closer to having a safer transplant option for most patients who, despite optimal therapy, continue to suffer from complications of sickle cell disease. Ideally, these transplants would not only be widely available, but the treatment would also be simplified to the point where most of the therapy could take place in an outpatient setting.

Q:  Why did you decide to work in this field?

A:  Sickle cell disease has lagged behind other disorders in terms of new treatment strategies for quite some time. I experienced this as a medical trainee and struggled when parents would ask me to “do something” for their child when most of the time all I could offer was pain medication. In the last five years or so, there has been more focus on sickle cell disease from the field and the community, so now is the time to work toward developing a widely available cure.

Dr. Laura Olivieri holding a 3D printed heart

Cardiology and radiology experts to participate in CMR 2018

Later this month, the international cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) community will gather in Barcelona, Spain, for CMR 2018, a joint meeting organized by the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR). Among the many attendees will be several cardiology and radiology experts from Children’s National Heart Institute:

  • Pediatric cardiology fellow Ashish Doshi, M.D., will be giving a talk titled, “Subendocardial resting perfusion defect in a case of acute fulminant myocarditis,” and will also present a poster titled, “Native T1 measurements in pediatric heart transplant patients correlate with history of prior rejection episodes.”
  • Pediatric cardiology fellow Rohan Kumthekar, M.D., will present a poster titled, “Native T1 values can identify pediatric patients with myocarditis.”
  • Cardiologist Laura Olivieri, M.D., will present two posters: “Native T1 measurements from CMR identify severity of myocardial disease over time in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy on therapy,” and “Feasibility of noncontrast T1 and T2 parametric mapping in assessment of acute ventricular ablation lesions in children.”
  • Pediatric cardiology fellow Neeta Sethi, M.D., will present a poster titled, “Cardiac magnetic resonance T2 mapping in the surveillance of acute allograft rejection in pediatric cardiac transplant patients.”

Additionally, Drs. Doshi and Sethi and Ileen Cronin, FNP-BC, a nurse practitioner in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory/Interventional Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (ICMR) Program, received travel awards to attend the conference.

CMR 2018 will be held January 31-February 3, 2018 and will focus on the theme of “Improving Clinical Value by Technical Advances.” The meeting’s emphasis will be on the common goal of improving clinical outcomes in cardiovascular disease through innovation in basic MR development and medical engineering.

Sarah Viall

Newborn screening leader selected to advisory committee on heritable disorders in newborns and children

Sarah Viall

Sarah Viall, PPCNP, coordinator for the Newborn Screening Program at the Children’s National Rare Disease Institute (CNRDI), has been invited to serve on the Education and Training Workgroup of the Health Resources & Services Administration’s (HRSA) Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children (ACHDNC).

Established under the Public Health Service Act, the ACHDNC focuses on reducing morbidity and mortality in newborns and children who have, or are at risk for, genetic disorders. The Committee currently recommends that all newborn screening programs include a Uniform Screening Panel that monitors for a total of 34 core disorders and another 26 secondary disorders.

In addition to developing recommendations on national newborn screening guidelines, the ACHDNC also advises the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary on the most appropriate application of newborn screening technologies, tests, policies and standards. The Committee provides technical information that helps develop Heritable Disorders Program policies and priorities that enhance the ability of local and state health agencies to provide screening, healthcare services and counseling for newborns and children affected by genetic disease.

Viall had previously spent a year observing meetings for the ACHDNC Education and Training Workgroup.

“I am thrilled to be an official member that can contribute to the important work of educating communities about newborn screening,” says Viall.

$3M Retrophin gift establishes Rare Disease Network at Children’s National

“This is an exciting first step toward a new era of rare disease care and innovation,” says Marshall Summar, M.D., director of the CNRDI. “We are grateful for this gift from Retrophin that will help us accelerate progress for our patients and families and pursue work that will have a far-reaching impact on both children and adults across the country and around the world thanks to the support of Retrophin.”

Children’s National Health System and Retrophin, Inc. have announced the creation of the Retrophin Rare Disease Network at Children’s National. Retrophin, a biopharmaceutical company specializing in identifying, developing and delivering life-changing therapies to people living with rare diseases, has committed $3 million over the next six years to support the work of the Children’s National Rare Disease Institute (CNRDI). Retrophin’s commitment marks the first corporate gift to CNRDI.

“One of the chief challenges of 21st century pediatric medicine is our continued inability to provide more help to those born with rare genetic diseases,” says Marshall Summar, M.D., director of the CNRDI. “This is an exciting first step toward a new era of rare disease care and innovation. We are grateful for this gift from Retrophin that will help us accelerate progress for our patients and families and pursue work that will have a far-reaching impact on both children and adults across the country and around the world thanks to the support of Retrophin.”

As a dedicated source of funding, the Retrophin Rare Disease Network will advance the CNRDI’s efforts to create a global “hub and spoke” model for disseminating and streamlining patient access to optimal care methods and among national and international peer institutions. The network will enhance the field of rare disease medicine by standardizing care models and establishing world-wide best practices in diagnosis and treatment.

The Retrophin Rare Disease Network will also provide funding for new dedicated positions at the CNRDI and build on the Institute’s existing digital and telemedicine programs, to extend the reach of its researchers and caregivers in areas where there is currently limited care available for children and adults living with rare diseases.

CNRDI is a first-of-its-kind center focused exclusively on advancing the care and treatment of children and adults with rare genetic diseases. The first National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Center of Excellence, it aims to provide a medical home for patients and families seeking the most advanced care and expertise for rare genetic conditions that remain largely unknown to the general medical community.