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illustration of Research & Innovation Campus

NIH awards $6.7M to build additional lab space at Children’s National Research & Innovation Campus

Children’s National Hospital today announced a $6.7 million award from the National Institute of Health (NIH) for the new Children’s National Research & Innovation Campus (RIC). The funds will help transform a historic building on the former site of Walter Reed Army Medical Center into new research labs. The NIH construction grant marks the first secured grant funding for Phase II of the campus project, signaling continued momentum for the first-of-its-kind pediatric research and innovation hub.

The funding was announced as D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, D.C. Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development John Falcicchio and D.C. Council Chair Phil Mendelson took their first tour of the already-renovated Phase I of the RIC. The campus began opening in early 2021 and brings together Children’s National with top-tier research and innovation partners: Johnson & Johnson Innovation – JLABS @ Washington, DC and Virginia Tech. They come together with a focus on driving discoveries and innovation that will save and improve the lives of children.

“This NIH award is the latest confirmation that we are creating something very special at the Children’s National Research & Innovation Campus,” said Kurt Newman, M.D., president and CEO of Children’s National. “Only the D.C. region can offer this proximity to federal science agencies and policy makers. When you pair our location with these incredible campus partners, I know the RIC will be a truly transformational space where we develop new and better ways to care for kids everywhere.”

The campus is an enormous addition to the BioHealth Capital Region, the fourth largest research and biotech cluster in the U.S., with the goal of becoming a top-three hub by 2023. The RIC exemplifies the city’s commitment to building the partnerships necessary to drive discoveries, create jobs, promote economic growth, treat underserved populations, improve health outcomes, and keep D.C. at the forefront of innovation and change.

“We are proud to officially welcome the Children’s National Research & Innovation Campus to the District and to the Ward 4 community,” said Mayor Bowser, after touring the campus. “This partnership pairs a world-class hospital with a top university and a premier business incubator – right here in the capital of inclusive innovation. Not only will our community benefit from the jobs and opportunities on this campus, but the ideas and innovation that are born here will benefit children and families right here in D.C. and all around the world.”

The NIH grant funding announced today will go toward the expansion and relocation of the DC Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (DC-IDDRC). This research center will increase the efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of children with developmental disabilities, including autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, inherited metabolic disorders and intellectual disability.

The space where the new lab will be built used to be the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Building, a portion of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The site closed and Children’s National secured 12 acres in 2016, breaking ground on Phase I construction in 2018.

The new space will offer highly cost-effective services and unique state-of-the-art research cores that are not available at other institutions, boosting the interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaboration between Children’s National, George Washington University, Georgetown University and Howard University. Investigators from the four institutions will access the center, which includes hoteling laboratory space for investigators whose laboratories are not on-site but are utilizing the core facilities — Cell and Tissue Microscopy, Genomics and Bioinformatics, and Inducible Pluripotent Stem Cells.

“While we have explored outsourcing some of these cores, especially genomics, we found that expertise, management, training and technical support needed for pediatric research requires on-site cores,” said Vittorio Gallo, Ph.D., interim chief academic officer, interim director of the Children’s National Research Institute, and principal investigator for the DC-IDDRC. “The facility is designed to support pediatric studies that are intimately connected with our community. We operate in a highly diverse environment, addressing issues of health equity through research.”

The RIC provides graduate students, postdocs and trainees with unique training opportunities, expanding the workforce and talent of new investigators in the D.C. area. Young investigators will have job opportunities as research assistants and facility managers as well. The new labs will support these researchers so they can tackle pressing questions in pediatric research by integrating pre-clinical and clinical models.

Phase II will place genetic and neuroscience research initiatives of the DC-IDDRC at the forefront to treat a variety of pediatric developmental disorders. Other Children’s National research centers will also benefit from this additional space. The clinical and research campuses will be physically and electronically integrated with new informatics and video-communication systems.

The total projected cost of Phase II is $180 million, with design and construction to take up to three years to complete once started.

illustration of Research & Innovation Campus

Phase II will place genetic and neuroscience research initiatives of the DC-IDDRC at the forefront to treat a variety of pediatric developmental disorders. Other Children’s National research centers will also benefit from this additional space. The clinical and research campuses will be physically and electronically integrated with new informatics and video-communication systems.

3d illustration of blood cells, plasmodium causing malaria disease

International projects spearheaded by Children’s National Neurology leaders

NIH approves grant for clinical trial on pediatric cerebral malaria in Malawi

3d illustration of blood cells, plasmodium causing malaria disease

Cerebral malaria, when patients lapse into coma after developing a malaria infection, is the most severe neurological complication of infection with Plasmodium falciparum.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) approved a $5.8 million grant for a Phase I/IIa randomized clinical trial of 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON), a new medication for pediatric cerebral malaria. Douglas Postels, M.D., neurologist at Children’s National Hospital, will serve as the trial’s principal investigator. The clinical trial will enroll participants in Blantyre, Malawi.

More than 400,000 people die each year from malaria. Cerebral malaria, when patients lapse into coma after developing a malaria infection, is the most severe neurological complication of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. Many children who survive are left suffering from neurological complications because of the disease, leaving some unable to walk, see or go to school. Dr. Postels and others are seeking to initiate this clinical trial with the primary goal to save lives and improve the quality of life for children who survive the disease.

“The purpose of this study is to see if DON is safe in the Malawian population,” Dr. Postels said, noting that adult participants will be enrolled in the first year and children subsequently. “Once the medication has proven to be safe, our intention is to expand this research elsewhere in Africa allowing us to enroll more children and evaluate whether DON decreases the likelihood of death or neurological disability in pediatric cerebral malaria.”

DON was originally tested 50 years ago as an anti-cancer agent but was recently repurposed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) for pediatric cerebral malaria. The current clinical trial is a collaborative project with the NIAID scientists who performed the pre-clinical testing with DON.

“There are currently no adjunctive treatments, used in combination with intravenous anti-malarial medications, that decrease death or disability in pediatric cerebral malaria,” Dr. Postels said. “Our hope is that DON will be the “magic bullet” that helps these critically ill children.”

Improving access to epilepsy care in Ethiopia

Over the next three years, Tesfaye Zelleke, M.D., neurophysiologist at Children’s National Hospital, the Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Program team and the Children’s National Global Health Initiative will create a sustainable program to reduce the epilepsy treatment gap in Ethiopia in collaboration with the Ethiopian Ministry of Health.

In a three-tier approach, the program is looking to help children in the country benefit from the increased access to the treatment and care for epilepsy, the most common neurologic disorder affecting about 1% of the population.

Ethiopia is one of the poorest countries in Africa with very limited access to epilepsy care — there are a handful of pediatric neurologists for a population of over 120 million. Only few referral hospitals have neurology clinics and those clinics are largely concentrated in Addis Ababa, the capital city. Improving access to epilepsy care in resource poor countries like Ethiopia would require utilizing non-neurologist providers, a task-shifting model.

“In the first year, we will focus on creating an epilepsy center of excellence, training of trainers (local non-neurologist providers), create treatment guidelines for epilepsy, and produce health education material for families and public,” said Dr. Zelleke. “In the subsequent years, we plan to expand to other areas outside of Addis Ababa — the Ethiopian capital — and collaborate with epilepsy advocacy groups to continue to increase access to care.”

After the three years, Dr. Zelleke and the team have envisioned working closely with the country’s Ministry of Health to further the impact of the project at a national level.

newborn

Predicting risk for infantile spasms after acute symptomatic neonatal seizures

newborn

Infantile spasms (IS) is a severe epilepsy in early childhood. Early treatment of IS provides the best chance of seizure remission and favorable developmental outcome.

Taeun Chang, M.D., director of the Neonatal Neurology and Neurocritical Care Program at Children’s National Hospital, participated in a study with other national pediatric experts which aimed to develop a prediction rule to accurately predict which neonates with acute symptomatic seizures will develop IS.

The group of researchers found that multiple potential predictors were associated with IS, including Apgar scores, EEG features, seizure characteristics, MRI abnormalities and clinical status at hospital discharge. The final model born from this work included three risk factors: (a) severely abnormal EEG or ≥3 days with seizures recorded on EEG, (b) deep gray or brainstem injury on MRI and (c) abnormal tone on discharge exam.

The significance of these findings is that IS risk after acute symptomatic neonatal seizures can be stratified using commonly available clinical data. No child without risk factors, vs >50% of those with all three factors, developed IS. This risk prediction rule may be valuable for clinical counseling as well as for selecting participants for clinical trials to prevent post‐neonatal epilepsy. This tailored approach may lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment and improve outcomes for a devastating early life epilepsy.

Read the full study in Epilepsia.

EEG with electrical activity of abnormal brain

Speckle tracking echo reveals possible biomarker for SUDEP risk

EEG with electrical activity of abnormal brain

A study published in the journal Epilepsia used speckle tracking echocardiography to detect subtle changes in heart function found in pediatric patients with refractory epilepsy when compared to controls. Children with refractory epilepsy had impaired systolic ventricular strain compared to controls, not correlated to epilepsy history. These differences in ventricular function may be a biomarker that can indicate someone with epilepsy is at higher risk for Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP).

Speckle tracking echocardiography is a non-invasive technique where software automatically identifies and tracks individual “speckles” of the myocardial wall on a routine echocardiogram in order to directly quantify the extent of contraction.

The study’s first authors, John Schreiber, M.D., medical director of Electroencephalography (EEG) and director of the Epilepsy Genetics program, and Lowell Frank, M.D., advanced imaging cardiologist and director of the Cardiology Fellowship Training program, both at Children’s National Hospital, answered some questions about the study findings.

Why is this important work?

Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is a rare but devastating consequence of epilepsy. Some of the proposed mechanisms of SUDEP implicate brain stem, cardiac and respiratory pathways.

This study identified alterations in ventricular function that may serve as one potential biomarker for SUDEP risk that can be evaluated non-invasively and regularly.

How will this work benefit patients?

Identification of children or adults with markedly impaired ventricular strain or diastolic function may provide the opportunity to implement a targeted treatment or monitoring strategy to prevent SUDEP.

What did you find that excites you? What are you hoping to discover?

These differences in cardiac strain were true for all patients with refractory epilepsy as a whole, not one particular group. This suggests that refractory convulsive epilepsy itself, rather than other patient-specific factors, produces these changes. Thanks in part to a grant from the Dravet Syndrome Foundation, the team is currently examining a cohort of patients with epilepsy due to pathogenic variants in sodium channel genes, SCN1A and SCN8A, to determine if these patients have greater degrees of impaired cardiac strain. SCN1A and SCN8A are also expressed in the heart, and patients have a considerably higher risk of SUDEP. It will be particularly exciting to examine for differences in specific genetic epilepsies.

How is this work unique?

Strain has been evaluated in many disease states in adult and pediatric populations and may be more sensitive to early myocardial damage than traditional measures of systolic and diastolic function. Children’s National Hospital has been an innovator in using speckle tracking echocardiography and similar techniques to evaluate subtle changes in heart function. This study is a great example of collaboration between The Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Program and the Children’s National Heart Institute that is driving innovative research at Children’s National Hospital.

MRI of the patient's head close-up

Madison Berl, Ph.D., receives 2020 PERF award for Infrastructure/Registry Research

MRI of the patient's head close-up

The Pediatric Epilepsy Research Foundation Grant (PERF) has awarded Madison Berl, Ph.D., neuropsychologist at Children’s National Hospital, the 2020 PERF award for Infrastructure/Registry Research. The funds will support her work on researching neuropsychological outcomes of children being considered for pediatric epilepsy surgery.

This grant, which provides $200,000 of research funding, will allow Dr. Berl to systematically collect data outcomes and create robust prediction models that are critical to achieving precision medicine that allows for selecting the most effective surgical treatment for an individual child.

“While seizures are a critical outcome, there is increasing recognition that outcomes beyond seizure control is critical to children and their families when evaluating and treating the impact of epilepsy and its treatments,” said Dr. Berl.

Guidelines and consensus statements related to pediatric epilepsy surgery are uniformly lacking high quality published outcome data to support clinical decisions that impact likelihood of seizure freedom and optimizing outcomes beyond seizures (e.g., neuropsychological functioning, quality of life, improved sleep). Despite recognition of the need for standardized collection of data on a multi-institutional basis, the efforts that exist are limited in scope.

Moreover, as new techniques – such as laser ablation and brain stimulation – are approved for pediatric patients, there is little information available to determine which children will benefit from which intervention.

“This project fundamentally is a multi-site registry for epilepsy surgery outcomes,” Dr. Berl added.

“However, this type of infrastructure also fosters growth and active collaboration within a network of pediatric epilepsy clinicians. I am excited because if successful, this will be the start of long-term collaborative effort.”

Neurology infographic

2020 at a glance: Neurology and Neurosurgery at Children’s National

 

The Children’s National Division of Neurology and Neurosurgery is consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top neurology programs in the nation and is currently #3 in the nation.

Drs. Oluigbo and Myseros

Spotlight on Children’s National Hospital Neurosurgery

Drs. Oluigbo and Myseros

Our neurosurgery team is among the most experienced in the nation. We have performed thousands of surgeries and are dedicated to giving the best possible care. The Children’s National Hospital Division of Neurosurgery consistently ranks among the country’s top programs according to U.S. News & World Report.

Patients travel to us from all over the world because we have the resources and expertise necessary to care for their neurological conditions through multidisciplinary programs such as:

  • Spine Disorders
  • Deep Brain Stimulation Program
  • Neuro Intensive Care Unit (Neuro ICU)
  • Neuro-ophthalmology
  • Spina Bifida Program
  • Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors
  • Craniofacial Disorders
  • Chiari Malformations
  • Epilepsy
  • Brachial Plexus Injury
  • Spasticity Program
  • Neurovascular diseases such as AVM’s and Moyamoya

Minimally invasive surgery

The Children’s National Hospital Division of Neurosurgery is among the first in the country to develop new techniques and adopt the latest technologies that make minimally invasive neurosurgery possible by utilizing state of the art equipment and developing new techniques, including:

  • ROSA surgical robot / SEEG placement
  • Surgical Theater with virtual reality visualization
  • Visualase® magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser ablation
  • 5T intra-operative MRI (iMRI)
  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Neuropace epilepsy control

Advanced treatment and cutting edge research

Children’s National is involved in cutting edge scientific research offering new hope for our patients and new methods of treatment. Our doctors have developed some of the most advanced treatments and clinics for our patients including:

  • Multidisciplinary skull base neurosurgery program
  • Participating in the 1st generation of genetic modulation trials
  • CAR T-Cell Therapy research
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) /Hypermobility Program
  • Pseudotumor Cerebri Multidisciplinary panel
  • Leader in open and endoscopic craniosynostosis surgery

Ranked No. 5 in the nation

U.S. News & World Report ranks our neurosurgery program number five in the nation, reflecting our commitment to excellence in care for our patients and families.

Level 1 surgery verification

Children’s National is one of only 12 children’s hospitals in the country to attain Level 1 Surgery Verification from the American College of Surgeons.

doctor performing neurosurgery

Successful outcomes

Children with rare and medically complex conditions, such as brain tumors, craniofacial disorders, Chiari malformations, vascular disorders and brachial plexus palsy, to name a few, achieve exceptional outcomes at Children’s National. Our patients experience fewer complications, go home sooner and maintain long-term symptom relief.

Specialized expertise

Our entire team is dedicated to meeting your child’s unique needs. Our Neuro-Intensive Care Unit nurses recognize signs of pain and complications your child may not be able to explain.

Pioneering new treatments

Children’s National is at the forefront of new device-based treatments that not only fix neurologic problems, but also restore brain function. We are one of the few pediatric programs in the country offering dedicated pediatric deep brain stimulation, which uses a pacemaker-like device to significantly reduce the burden of movement disorders and difficult-to-control epilepsy, as well as Neuropace implantation to help with seizures in eloquent areas of the brain.

Training the next generation of top neurosurgeons

We are proudly training the next generation of pediatric neurosurgeons through residency programs and fellowships in conjunction with several area medical schools.

William Gaillard

William D. Gaillard, M.D., elected president of the American Epilepsy Society

William Gaillard

“The AES, is one of the oldest neurological professional organizations in the country dedicated to the scientific investigation, exchange of clinical information and eradication of epilepsy and associated disorders, and I’m honored to serve as the new president,” Dr. Gaillard said.

In early December 2019, William D. Gaillard, M.D., chief of the Divisions of Child Neurology, Epilepsy and Neurophysiology at Children’s National Hospital, began his term as president of the American Epilepsy Society (AES) at the annual meeting in Baltimore. The AES is a medical and scientific society with over 4,000 members consisting of clinicians, scientists investigating basic and clinical aspects of epilepsy, and other professionals interested in seizure disorders.

“The AES, is one of the oldest neurological professional organizations in the country dedicated to the scientific investigation, exchange of clinical information and eradication of epilepsy and associated disorders, and I’m honored to serve as the new president,” Dr. Gaillard said.

Dr. Gaillard’s clinical research focuses on the use of advanced imaging to investigate the effect of childhood epilepsy on brain structure and function with an emphasis on cognitive systems. His group also develops and implements imaging strategies to improve epilepsy outcomes.

In addition, Dr. Gaillard, an active participant in AES activities, has served as treasurer and as chair of the Clinical Investigator Workshop and Pediatric Content Committees. He also serves as an associate editor for the journal Epilepsy Research, and as a regular reviewer on AES and Epilepsy Foundation study sections.

As division chief of Child Neurology, Epilepsy and Neurophysiology, Dr. Gaillard directs a team of pediatric specialists who see thousands of patients each year. Dr. Gaillard has worked throughout his career to care for children and young adults with epilepsy from the onset of seizures through novel therapeutic interventions, medication trials and, when appropriate, surgery. Treatment options at Children’s National addresses the full range of the condition, including problems of difficult-to-control epilepsy. Additionally, treatment includes the concurrent social, education and emotional issues faced by children with the condition and their families.

His academic appointments include Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at George Washington University, Professor of Neurology at Georgetown University, and Professor (adjunct), Hearing and Speech, University of Maryland, College Park.

Epilepsy infographic

At a glance: Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Program

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological conditions that lasts a lifetime, and, in extreme cases, can lead to death. It affects one out of every 26 people across their lifetime, and 8% of children will have a seizure before leaving childhood. One in 10 children with epilepsy is a candidate for surgery.

Children’s National has one of the largest and most experienced multidisciplinary epilepsy programs in the country with a range of programs specializing in new onset epilepsy, the ketogenic diet, intractable epilepsy, neuroinflammation, neurogenetics, epilepsy surgery, epileptic encephalopathy and more.

The Children’s National epilepsy program is continuously working to improve care for patients through clinical innovation, growing our team and expanding access in locations throughout the region.

Epilepsy infographic

To refer a patient or learn more about our program, call 202-476-3611 or visit ChildrensNational.org/Epilepsy.

brain network illustration

$2.5M to protect the brain from metabolic insult

brain network illustration

The brain comprises only 2% of the body’s volume, but it uses more than 20% of its energy, which makes this organ particularly vulnerable to changes in metabolism.

More than 30 million Americans have diabetes, with the vast majority having Type 2 disease. Characterized by insulin resistance and persistently high blood sugar levels, poorly controlled Type 2 diabetes has a host of well-recognized complications: compared with the general population, a greatly increased risk of kidney disease, vision loss, heart attacks and strokes and lower limb amputations.

But more recently, says Nathan A. Smith, MS, Ph.D., a principal investigator in Children’s National Research Institute’s Center for Neuroscience Research, another consequence has become increasingly apparent. With increasing insulin resistance comes cognitive damage, a factor that contributes significantly to dementia diagnoses as patients age.

The brain comprises only 2% of the body’s volume, but it uses more than 20% of its energy, Smith explains – which makes this organ particularly vulnerable to changes in metabolism. Type 2 diabetes and even prediabetic changes in glucose metabolism inflict damage upon this organ in mechanisms with dangerous synergy, he adds. Insulin resistance itself stresses brain cells, slowly depriving them of fuel. As blood sugar rises, it also increases inflammation and blocks nitric oxide, which together narrow the brain’s blood vessels while also increasing blood viscosity.

When the brain’s neurons slowly starve, they become increasingly inefficient at doing their job, eventually succumbing to this deprivation. These hits don’t just affect individual cells, Smith adds. They also affect connectivity that spans across the brain, neural networks that are a major focus of his research.

While it’s well established that Type 2 diabetes significantly boosts the risk of cognitive decline, Smith says, it’s been unclear whether this process might be halted or even reversed. It’s this question that forms the basis of a collaborative Frontiers grant, $2.5 million from the National Science Foundation split between his laboratory; the lead institution, Stony Brook University; and Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

Smith and colleagues at the three institutions are testing whether changing the brain’s fuel source from glucose to ketones – byproducts from fat metabolism – could potentially save neurons and neural networks over time. Ketones already have shown promise for decades in treating some types of epilepsy, a disease that sometimes stems from an imbalance in neuronal excitation and inhibition. When some patients start on a ketogenic diet – an extreme version of a popular fat-based diet – many can significantly decrease or even stop their seizures, bringing their misfiring brain cells back to health.

Principal Investigator Smith and his laboratory at the Children’s National Research Institute are using experimental models to test whether ketones could protect the brain against the ravages of insulin resistance. They’re looking specifically at interneurons, the inhibitory cells of the brain and the most energy demanding. The team is using a technique known as patch clamping to determine how either insulin resistance or insulin resistance in the presence of ketones affect these cells’ ability to fire.

They’re also looking at how calcium ions migrate in and out of the cells’ membranes, a necessary prerequisite for neurons’ electrical activity. Finally, they’re evaluating whether these potential changes to the cells’ electrophysiological properties in turn change how different parts of the brain communicate with each other, potentially restructuring the networks that are vital to every action this organ performs.

Colleagues at Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, led by Principal Investigator Eva-Maria Ratai, Ph.D.,  will perform parallel work in human subjects. They will use imaging to determine how these two fuel types, glucose or ketones, affect how the brain uses energy and produces the communication molecules known as neurotransmitters. They’re also investigating how these factors might affect the stability of neural networks using techniques that investigate the performance of these networks both while study subjects are at rest and performing a task.

Finally, colleagues at the Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology at Stony Brook University, led by Principal Investigator Lilianne R. Mujica-Parodi, Ph.D., will use results generated at the other two institutions to construct computational models that can accurately predict how the brain will behave under metabolic stress: how it copes when deprived of fuel and whether it might be able to retain healthy function when its cells receive ketones instead of glucose.

Collectively, Smith says, these results could help retain brain function even under glucose restraints. (For this, the research team owes a special thanks to Mujica-Parodi, who assembled the group to answer this important question, thus underscoring the importance of team science, he adds.)

“By supplying an alternate fuel source, we may eventually be able to preserve the brain even in the face of insulin resistance,” Smith says.

Jake and Dr. Oluigbo

Doctors at Children’s National give Jake his life back

Jake and Dr. Oluigbo

At the age of 17, Jake underwent surgery led by neurosurgeon Chima Oluigbo, M.D., where he conducted a temporal lobe resection, also called temporal lobectomy, that works to lower the number of seizures, make them less severe or stop them completely. The surgery ended up being successful and it worked to greatly improve his overall quality of life.

Since 1969, November has been considered Epilepsy Awareness Month to highlight the importance of recognizing a seizure and promoting seizure first aid. At Children’s National Hospital, doctors in the division of neurology are committed to finding treatments for epilepsy and have done just that by helping Jacob Yates, an 18-year-old patient, get his life back.

For many families the holidays are meant for spending time with loved ones and enjoying the seasonal festivities. However, the holidays were not always a joyous occasion for Jake and his family. Since he was a baby, many of his holidays were spent in a bed due to a brain disorder that caused him to have developmental delays and, at times, up to 17 seizures a day.

“The holidays were always a tough time for the family because Jake would get so excited around Christmas that it would overwhelm his system and induce seizures that took him days to recover from,” says his mom, Jennifer.

Jake was born a preemie and hours after he was born, doctors at his local hospital had identified that he was having trouble breathing. By coincidence, the Children’s National transport team was on-site to take another patient to Children’s National, but once they looked at Jake they immediately took him instead by SkyBear Air Transport, the hospital’s rapid helicopter transport service.

During his stay at Children’s National, Jake was in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for 11 days and was supported by breathing machines to help with respiratory distress and other issues stemming from him being born prematurely.

“If it wasn’t for the Children’s National transport team coincidentally being at our local hospital, Jake wouldn’t have survived staying at that location,” said Jennifer.

After he was taken care of at Children’s National, he was discharged 11 days later, but at the age of three months Jake was still experiencing respiratory issues and was taken back to his local hospital in Charles County.

“When he first arrived back at the University of Maryland Charles Regional Medical Center, the doctors thought he may have had cystic fibrosis, but it came back that perhaps he was suffering from reflux and they put him on medication,” Jennifer recalls. Unfortunately, this was not the cause and it would not be the family’s last visit to the hospital.

By the age of six months, Jake had his first seizure and he was flown back to Children’s National. Over the next year he was repeatedly admitted to the hospital as his seizures had caused him to stop breathing.

Between the ages of 4 to 6 years old, Jake became a patient of William D. Gaillard, M.D., division chief of epilepsy and neurophysiology and Roger Packer, M.D., senior vice president at the Center of Neuroscience and Behavioral Health at Children’s National. After his visit, both doctors recommended surgery, but Dr. Packer recommended that Jake receive an electroencephalogram (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and go through a sleep study first to identify the specific causes of his seizures.

Now on a new medication, his seizures were maintained for the most part, but doctors were still recommending that it was time for surgery. When Jake was 15, his parents re-evaluated the surgery and learned that their son had a 76% chance of being seizure and medication free.

At the age of 17, Jake underwent surgery led by Chima Oluigbo, M.D., neurosurgeon at Children’s National, where he conducted a temporal lobe resection, also called temporal lobectomy, that works to lower the number of seizures, make them less severe or stop them completely. The surgery ended up being successful and it worked to greatly improve his overall quality of life.

Before the surgery, Jake didn’t speak much, experienced anxiety and had difficulty expressing his emotions. He had never told his mother that he loved her. After the surgery, Jake looked at his mother and said, “I love you babe.”

According to Jennifer, since the surgery her son is a completely different person and states that he has been seizure free for over a year. Equally, Jake and the family can now all look forward to the holidays.

“We’re so excited to have him share the holidays,” Jennifer says. “He feels better and it shows through his attitude and the way he responds to things. Words can’t express the gratitude we have for the doctors at Children’s National Hospital. They gave my son his life back.”

Andrea Gropman

$5M in federal funding to help patients with urea cycle disorders

Andrea Gropman

Andrea L. Gropman, M.D.: We have collected many years of longitudinal clinical data, but with this new funding now we can answer questions about these diseases that are meaningful on a day-to-day basis for patients with urea cycle disorders.

An international research consortium co-led by Andrea L. Gropman, M.D., at Children’s National Hospital has received $5 million in federal funding as part of an overall effort to better understand rare diseases and accelerate potential treatments to patients.

Urea cycle disorder, one such rare disease, is a hiccup in a series of biochemical reactions that transform nitrogen into a non-toxic compound, urea. The six enzymes and two carrier/transport molecules that accomplish this essential task reside primarily in the liver and, to a lesser degree, in other organs.

The majority of patients have the recessive form of the disorder, meaning it has skipped a generation. These kids inherit one copy of an abnormal gene from each parent, while the parents themselves were not affected, says Dr. Gropman, chief of the Division of Neurodevelopmental Pediatrics and Neurogenetics at Children’s National. Another more common version of the disease is carried on the X chromosome and affects boys more seriously that girls, given that boys have only one X chromosome.

Regardless of the type of urea cycle disorder, when the urea cycle breaks down, nitrogen converts into toxic ammonia that builds up in the body (hyperammonemia), particularly in the brain. As a result, the person may feel lethargic; if the ammonia in the bloodstream reaches the brain in high concentrations, the person can experience seizures, behavior changes and lapse into a coma.

Improvements in clinical care and the advent of effective medicines have transformed this once deadly disease into a more manageable chronic ailment.

“It’s gratifying that patients diagnosed with urea cycle disorder now are surviving, growing up, becoming young adults and starting families themselves. Twenty to 30 years ago, this never would have seemed conceivable,” Dr. Gropman says. “We have collected many years of longitudinal clinical data, but with this new funding now we can answer questions about these diseases that are meaningful on a day-to-day basis for patients with urea cycle disorders.”

In early October 2019, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium for which Dr. Gropman is co-principal investigator a five-year grant. This is the fourth time that the international Consortium of physicians, scientists, neuropsychologists, nurses, genetic counselors and researchers has received NIH funding to study this group of conditions.

Dr. Gropman says the current urea cycle research program builds on a sturdy foundation built by previous principal investigators Mendel Tuchman, M.D., and Mark Batshaw, M.D., also funded by the NIH. While previous rounds of NIH funding powered research about patients’ long-term survival prospects and cognitive dysfunction, this next phase of research will explore patients’ long-term health.

Among the topics they will study:

Long-term organ damage. Magnetic resonance elastrography (MRE) is a state-of-the-art imaging technique that combines the sharp images from MRI with a visual map that shows body tissue stiffness. The research team will use MRE to look for early changes in the liver – before patients show any symptoms – that could be associated with long-term health impacts. Their aim is spot the earliest signs of potential liver dysfunction in order to intervene before the patient develops liver fibrosis.

Academic achievement. The research team will examine gaps in academic achievement for patients who appear to be underperforming to determine what is triggering the discrepancy between their potential and actual scholastics. If they uncover issues such as learning difficulties or mental health concerns like anxiety, there are opportunities to intervene to boost academic achievement.

“And if we find many of the patients meet the criteria for depression or anxiety disorders, there are potential opportunities to intervene.  It’s tricky: We need to balance their existing medications with any new ones to ensure that we don’t increase their hyperammonemia risk,” Dr. Gropman explains.

Neurologic complications. The researchers will tap continuous, bedside electroencephalogram, which measures the brain’s electrical activity, to detect silent seizures and otherwise undetectable changes in the brain in an effort to stave off epilepsy, a brain disorder that causes seizures.

“This is really the first time we will examine babies’ brains,” she adds. “Our previous imaging studies looked at kids and adults who were 6 years and older. Now, we’re lowering that age range down to infants. By tracking such images over time, the field has described the trajectory of what normal brain development should look like. We can use that as a background and comparison point.”

In the future, newborns may be screened for urea cycle disorder shortly after birth. Because it is not possible to diagnose it in the womb in cases where there is no family history, the team aims to better counsel families contemplating pregnancy about their possible risks.

Research described in this post was underwritten by the NIH through its Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network.

Children's National employs 45 pediatric neurologists and 6 pediatric neurosurgeons.

2019 at a glance: Neuroscience at Children’s National

The Children’s National Division of Neurology and Neurosurgery is consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top neurology programs in the nation.
John Schreiber

New study to raise profile of SCN8A-related disorders

John Schreiber

“The Cute Syndrome Foundation reached out because children with this disorder are dying. They were hoping to find a way to make more people, especially medical professionals, aware of this disorder and treatment recommendations,” said John Schreiber, M.D.

Children’s National Health System is proud to share that they have launched into a 6-month pilot research program to evaluate and improve education and access to care for SCN8A-related epilepsy. Due to advances in genetic testing, more patients with SCN8A mutations and other rare genetic epilepsies are being discovered all the time.

The research for the pilot program is being led by John Schreiber, M.D., assistant professor of neurology and pediatrics and director of the epilepsy genetics program at Children National. Dr. Schreiber will help to develop a more focused effort to provide families and clinicians with the Clinician Information and Reference Guide that was created by The Cute Syndrome Foundation. The goal of the information is to provide families and clinicians with a guide to remove barriers to access expert care.

“The Cute Syndrome Foundation reached out because children with this disorder are dying. They were hoping to find a way to make more people, especially medical professionals, aware of this disorder and treatment recommendations,” said Dr. Schreiber. “We’re at a critical point of collecting information as patients from around the world are looking at Children’s National as a leader to combat this type of disorder.”

As the first study of its kind in a rare genetic epilepsy, the pilot will provide the opportunity for future interventions that will help elevate the profile of SCN8A-related disorders, improve overall patient outcomes and facilitate collaborative partnerships that focus on research and on supporting positive outcomes for patients.

To help uncover barriers to accessing expert advice, the SCN8A survey was given out to over 200 health care professionals at Children’s National 2019 Pediatric Neurology Update meeting. Specifically, the study will help doctors at Children’s National increase provider knowledge of SN8A-related disorders, improve utilization of appropriate anti-seizure therapies and may ultimately end up reducing mortality.

Children’s National received a gift of $15,397 to establish the SCN8A Education and Research Fund, which will support research within the Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Program to evaluate access to and increase awareness of SCN8A epileptic encephalopathy and treatment recommendation from experts in the field. The funds will be used for personnel, technology and material costs associated with the research.

Billie Lou Short and Kurt Newman at Research and Education Week

Research and Education Week honors innovative science

Billie Lou Short and Kurt Newman at Research and Education Week

Billie Lou Short, M.D., received the Ninth Annual Mentorship Award in Clinical Science.

People joke that Billie Lou Short, M.D., chief of Children’s Division of Neonatology, invented extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, known as ECMO for short. While Dr. Short did not invent ECMO, under her leadership Children’s National was the first pediatric hospital to use it. And over decades Children’s staff have perfected its use to save the lives of tiny, vulnerable newborns by temporarily taking over for their struggling hearts and lungs. For two consecutive years, Children’s neonatal intensive care unit has been named the nation’s No. 1 for newborns by U.S. News & World Report. “Despite all of these accomplishments, Dr. Short’s best legacy is what she has done as a mentor to countless trainees, nurses and faculty she’s touched during their careers. She touches every type of clinical staff member who has come through our neonatal intensive care unit,” says An Massaro, M.D., director of residency research.

For these achievements, Dr. Short received the Ninth Annual Mentorship Award in Clinical Science.

Anna Penn, M.D., Ph.D., has provided new insights into the central role that the placental hormone allopregnanolone plays in orderly fetal brain development, and her research team has created novel experimental models that mimic some of the brain injuries often seen in very preterm babies – an essential step that informs future neuroprotective strategies. Dr. Penn, a clinical neonatologist and developmental neuroscientist, “has been a primary adviser for 40 mentees throughout their careers and embodies Children’s core values of Compassion, Commitment and Connection,” says Claire-Marie Vacher, Ph.D.

For these achievements, Dr. Penn was selected to receive the Ninth Annual Mentorship Award in Basic and Translational Science.

The mentorship awards for Drs. Short and Penn were among dozens of honors given in conjunction with “Frontiers in Innovation,” the Ninth Annual Research and Education Week (REW) at Children’s National. In addition to seven keynote lectures, more than 350 posters were submitted from researchers – from high-school students to full-time faculty – about basic and translational science, clinical research, community-based research, education, training and quality improvement; five poster presenters were showcased via Facebook Live events hosted by Children’s Hospital Foundation.

Two faculty members won twice: Vicki Freedenberg, Ph.D., APRN, for research about mindfulness-based stress reduction and Adeline (Wei Li) Koay, MBBS, MSc, for research related to HIV. So many women at every stage of their research careers took to the stage to accept honors that Naomi L.C. Luban, M.D., Vice Chair of Academic Affairs, quipped that “this day is power to women.”

Here are the 2019 REW award winners:

2019 Elda Y. Arce Teaching Scholars Award
Barbara Jantausch, M.D.
Lowell Frank, M.D.

Suzanne Feetham, Ph.D., FAA, Nursing Research Support Award
Vicki Freedenberg, Ph.D., APRN, for “Psychosocial and biological effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction intervention in adolescents with CHD/CIEDs: a randomized control trial”
Renee’ Roberts Turner for “Peak and nadir experiences of mid-level nurse leaders”

2019-2020 Global Health Initiative Exploration in Global Health Awards
Nathalie Quion, M.D., for “Latino youth and families need assessment,” conducted in Washington
Sonia Voleti for “Handheld ultrasound machine task shifting,” conducted in Micronesia
Tania Ahluwalia, M.D., for “Simulation curriculum for emergency medicine,” conducted in India
Yvonne Yui for “Designated resuscitation teams in NICUs,” conducted in Ghana
Xiaoyan Song, Ph.D., MBBS, MSc, “Prevention of hospital-onset infections in PICUs,” conducted in China

Ninth Annual Research and Education Week Poster Session Awards

Basic and Translational Science
Faculty:
Adeline (Wei Li) Koay, MBBS, MSc, for “Differences in the gut microbiome of HIV-infected versus HIV-exposed, uninfected infants”
Faculty: Hayk Barseghyan, Ph.D., for “Composite de novo Armenian human genome assembly and haplotyping via optical mapping and ultra-long read sequencing”
Staff: Damon K. McCullough, BS, for “Brain slicer: 3D-printed tissue processing tool for pediatric neuroscience research”
Staff: Antonio R. Porras, Ph.D., for “Integrated deep-learning method for genetic syndrome screening using facial photographs”
Post docs/fellows/residents: Lung Lau, M.D., for “A novel, sprayable and bio-absorbable sealant for wound dressings”
Post docs/fellows/residents:
Kelsey F. Sugrue, Ph.D., for “HECTD1 is required for growth of the myocardium secondary to placental insufficiency”
Graduate students:
Erin R. Bonner, BA, for “Comprehensive mutation profiling of pediatric diffuse midline gliomas using liquid biopsy”
High school/undergraduate students: Ali Sarhan for “Parental somato-gonadal mosaic genetic variants are a source of recurrent risk for de novo disorders and parental health concerns: a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis”

Clinical Research
Faculty:
Amy Hont, M.D., for “Ex vivo expanded multi-tumor antigen specific T-cells for the treatment of solid tumors”
Faculty: Lauren McLaughlin, M.D., for “EBV/LMP-specific T-cells maintain remissions of T- and B-cell EBV lymphomas after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation”

Staff: Iman A. Abdikarim, BA, for “Timing of allergenic food introduction among African American and Caucasian children with food allergy in the FORWARD study”
Staff: Gelina M. Sani, BS, for “Quantifying hematopoietic stem cells towards in utero gene therapy for treatment of sickle cell disease in fetal cord blood”
Post docs/fellows/residents: Amy H. Jones, M.D., for “To trach or not trach: exploration of parental conflict, regret and impacts on quality of life in tracheostomy decision-making”
Graduate students: Alyssa Dewyer, BS, for “Telemedicine support of cardiac care in Northern Uganda: leveraging hand-held echocardiography and task-shifting”
Graduate students: Natalie Pudalov, BA, “Cortical thickness asymmetries in MRI-abnormal pediatric epilepsy patients: a potential metric for surgery outcome”
High school/undergraduate students:
Kia Yoshinaga for “Time to rhythm detection during pediatric cardiac arrest in a pediatric emergency department”

Community-Based Research
Faculty:
Adeline (Wei Li) Koay, MBBS, MSc, for “Recent trends in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area”
Staff: Gia M. Badolato, MPH, for “STI screening in an urban ED based on chief complaint”
Post docs/fellows/residents:
Christina P. Ho, M.D., for “Pediatric urinary tract infection resistance patterns in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area”
Graduate students:
Noushine Sadeghi, BS, “Racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of sexual health services among adolescent females”

Education, Training and Program Development
Faculty:
Cara Lichtenstein, M.D., MPH, for “Using a community bus trip to increase knowledge of health disparities”
Staff:
Iana Y. Clarence, MPH, for “TEACHing residents to address child poverty: an innovative multimodal curriculum”
Post docs/fellows/residents:
Johanna Kaufman, M.D., for “Inpatient consultation in pediatrics: a learning tool to improve communication”
High school/undergraduate students:
Brett E. Pearson for “Analysis of unanticipated problems in CNMC human subjects research studies and implications for process improvement”

Quality and Performance Improvement
Faculty:
Vicki Freedenberg, Ph.D., APRN, for “Implementing a mindfulness-based stress reduction curriculum in a congenital heart disease program”
Staff:
Caleb Griffith, MPH, for “Assessing the sustainability of point-of-care HIV screening of adolescents in pediatric emergency departments”
Post docs/fellows/residents:
Rebecca S. Zee, M.D., Ph.D., for “Implementation of the Accelerated Care of Torsion (ACT) pathway: a quality improvement initiative for testicular torsion”
Graduate students:
Alysia Wiener, BS, for “Latency period in image-guided needle bone biopsy in children: a single center experience”

View images from the REW2019 award ceremony.

William Gaillard

William D. Gaillard, M.D., begins tenure as Second Vice President of the American Epilepsy Society

William Gaillard

William Davis Gaillard, M.D., has begun his term as President-Elect of the American Epilepsy Society (AES), a medical and scientific society with over 4,000 members. Dr. Gaillard’s term started at the end of the society’s annual meeting in New Orleans, La. in December 2018. Dr. Gaillard will become president of the society in 2020.

Dr. Gaillard, an internationally recognized expert in pediatric epilepsy and imaging, is chief of the divisions of Child Neurology, Epilepsy and Neurophysiology, as well as director of the Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Program at the Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C. He is also the associate director of the DC-IDDC and director of the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (DC-IDDRC) imaging core and associate director of the Center for Neuroscience Research, Children’s Research Institute. His academic appointments include professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at the George Washington University, professor of Neurology at Georgetown University and professor adjunct of Hearing and Speech Sciences University of Maryland, College Park.

As division chief of Child Neurology, Epilepsy and Neurophysiology, Dr. Gaillard directs a team of pediatric specialists who see thousands of patients each year. Dr. Gaillard has worked throughout his career to care for children and young adults with epilepsy from the onset of seizures through novel therapeutic interventions, medication trials and, when appropriate, surgery. Treatment at Children’s National addresses the full range of the condition, including problems of difficult-to-control epilepsy. Additionally, treatment includes the concurrent social, educational and emotional issues faced by children with the condition and their families.

An active member of AES for more than 25 years, Dr. Gaillard has served as treasurer and as chair of the Clinical Investigator Workshop and Pediatric Content Committees. He is an active participant in mentoring activities, including the Junior Investigators Mentoring program and past co-chair of the AES Research and Training Grant Review Study Section. He also serves as an associate editor for the journal Epilepsy Research.

Epilepsy Infographic

By the Numbers: Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Program

Children’s National Health System’s Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Program is one of the largest and most experienced multidisciplinary epilepsy programs in the country. With a range of programs specializing in new onset epilepsy, the Ketogenic diet, intractable epilepsy, neuroinflammation, neurogenetics, epilepsy surgery and more. The epilepsy program at Children’s National is continuously working to improve care for patients through clinical innovation, active studies and utilizing the most advanced technologies in epilepsy surgery. Children’s National has one of the best surgical outcomes in the county, aided by advanced structural and functional imaging, minimally invasive techniques, deep brain stimulation, neuronavigation, neurorobotics using the ROSA stereotactic neurosurgical robot and intraoperative MRI.

Epilepsy Infographic

neuron

Children’s National to host 29th Annual Pediatric Neurology Update

neuron

The Children’s National Health System Center for Neuroscience and Behavioral Medicine is proud to host the 29th Annual Pediatric Neurology Update course.

This year’s course will focus on three critical areas in pediatric neuroscience and neurodevelopment: epilepsy with focuses on innovations in epilepsy surgery and new therapeutics; tuberous sclerosis including neurosurgical advances and transition to adulthood; and autism spectrum disorder with emphasis on new understandings and pre-requisites for an “Autism Friendly Hospital.”

We invite you to join us for presentations from renowned experts in the field in this full-day, CME accredited event on April 11, 2019 at the Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center in Rockville, MD.

For more information and to register, visit ChildrensNational.org/NeurologyUpdate.

Chima Oluigbo examines a patient

Eradicating epilepsy with Visualase

Chima Oluigbo examines a patient

Chima Oluigbo, M.D., and his team are using Visualase to identify and eliminate seizure foci and provide patients with a minimally invasive procedure for treating epilepsy.

About one in 26 people will be diagnosed with epilepsy in their lifetime. That adds up to about 3.4 million people in the U.S., or about 1 percent of the population nationwide. This condition can have huge consequences on quality of life, affecting whether children will learn well in school, eventually drive a car, hold down a job or even survive into adulthood.

For most of those that develop epilepsy, medications can keep seizures in check. However, for about a third of patients, this strategy doesn’t work, says Chima Oluigbo, M.D., an attending neurosurgeon at Children’s National Health System. That’s when he and his team offer a surgical fix.

Epilepsy surgery has come a long way, Dr. Oluigbo explains. When he first began practicing in the early 2000s, most surgeries were open, he says – they involved making a long incision in the scalp that can span half a foot or more. After drilling out a window of skull that can be as long as five inches, surgeons had to dig through healthy brain to find the abnormal tissue and remove it.

Each part of this “maximally invasive” procedure can be traumatic on a patient, Dr. Oluigbo says. That leads to significant pain after the procedure, extended hospital stays of at least a week followed by a long recovery. There are also significant risks for neurological complications including stroke, weakness, paralysis, speech problems and more.

However, open surgery isn’t the only option for epilepsy surgery anymore. Several new minimally invasive alternatives are now available to patients and the most promising, Dr. Oluigbo says, is called Visualase. He and his team are the only surgeons in the region who perform this procedure.

In Visualase surgeries, Dr. Oluigbo and his colleagues start by making a tiny incision, about 5 millimeters, on the scalp. Through this opening, they bore an even tinier hole into the skull and thread a needle inside that’s about 1.6 millimeters wide. “The brain barely notices that it’s there,” he says.

The tip of this wire holds a laser. Once this tip is placed directly at the seizure foci – the cluster of nerve cells responsible for generating a seizure – the patient is placed in an intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device. There, after checking the tip’s precise placement, the surgeons turn the laser on. Heat from the laser eradicates the foci, which the surgeons can see in real time using MRI thermography technology. The margins of the destroyed tissue are well-defined, largely sparing healthy tissue.

After the wire is removed, the incision is closed with a single stitch, and patients go home the next day. The majority of patients are seizure free, with rates as high as 90 percent for some types of epilepsy, Dr. Oluigbo says. Although seizure-free rates are also high for open procedures, he adds, Visualase spares them many of open surgeries’ painful and difficult consequences.

“Having done both open surgeries and Visualase,” Dr. Oluigbo says, “I can tell you the difference is night and day.”

Although open procedures will still be necessary for some patients with particularly large foci that are close to the surface, Dr. Oluigbo says that Visualase is ideal for treating medication-resistant cases in which the foci are buried deep within the brain. A typical example is a condition called hypothalamic hamartoma, in which tumors on the hypothalamus lead to gelastic seizures, an unusual seizure type characterized by uncontrollable laughing. He also uses Visualase for another condition called tuberous sclerosis, in which waxy growths called tubers develop in the brain, and for cancerous and benign brain tumors.

It’s gratifying to be able to help these children become seizure-free for the rest of their lives, says Dr. Oluigbo – even more so with the numerous updates he receives from families telling him how much this procedure has improved their children’s lifestyle.

“Visualase has completely changed the way that we approach these patients,” Dr. Oluigbo says. “It’s extraordinary to see the effects that this one procedure can have on the quality of life for patients here at Children’s National.”

NeuroPace RNS x-ray

New brain “pacemaker” offers new hope for refractory epilepsy

NeuroPace RNS x-ray

Example of NeuroPace RNS System placement.

If a child’s refractory seizures – seizures that don’t respond to medication – are originating in a part of the brain that is central to function (for example, impacting memory or verbal skills) the standard next step – surgical resection – is not an option for seizure reduction or relief. In most cases, these children are followed, more medications are tried, and other strategies attempted, but few viable options exist to ease their symptoms.

It’s possible that the next generation of implantable neurostimulators, which act as a type of pacemaker for the brain, might make a difference for some children previously left with no answers. Children’s National neurosurgeon Chima Oluigbo, M.D., in collaboration with the Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Program at Children’s National, is looking at how these devices might be used to reduce or eliminate refractory seizures in pediatric patients. One example of this type of device is the RNS System.

“The RNS has been FDA approved for adults since 2013,” says Dr. Oluigbo, who recently implanted a NeuroPace RNS in the first pediatric patient at Children’s National, and one of the first young patients in the country. “The safety and efficacy data in the adult population, now gathered from a cohort of more than 800 adults, is showing positive outcomes so far. That allows pediatric neurosurgeons to consider an off-label use of this device for patients under the approved usage age of 18, when no other treatments exist.”

The RNS operates differently from previous neuro pacemaker-style devices. It is a “closed-loop” system that doesn’t require external activation once a seizure has started. Instead, the precise location of seizure origination is identified via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Leads are then placed at the seizure site via surgery, and once activated, the RNS monitors and self-activates when pre-seizure electrical impulses are detected. The device responds by emitting a series of its own electrical impulses to interrupt and reset the brain’s seizure activity. The RNS system’s ability to continuously monitor the patient also allows physicians to get an inside look at the ongoing brain function of these young patients.

“Children’s National is one of the first places to apply the use of this device in children, because we are one of the few locations on the East coast with the multi-disciplinary expertise to implement it safely and effectively,” says Dr. Oluigbo. “Our clinical epilepsy team has been imaging and treating children with epilepsy for almost 30 years. With one of the oldest neurosurgical programs in country and our technological capabilities, Children’s National becomes the perfect location to explore how technology like this can improve the quality of life for our patients, many of whom have previously been told there is nothing more we can do to help.”

De-personalized data from patients who receive the NeuroPace RNS will be shared with the company in the hopes that the data will assist the FDA in assessing the appropriateness of extending the age range of approval from 18 and above to 12 and above.

“Our hope is to contribute to the body of data about this device and determine if it will improve the lives of our younger patients the way it has already been done for adults,” Dr. Oluigbo concludes. “Kids’ brains may respond differently, however, sharing our patients’ experiences and outcomes will help us identify whether or not this is a viable and promising option for more children with refractory epilepsy.”