Public Health

little girl holding a stuffed bear

Population Strategies for Children’s Health Summit

little girl holding a stuffed bear

Children’s National, with sponsorship from Cerner Corporation, is excited to announce the first Population Strategies for Children’s Health Summit on February 19 – 20, 2018 at The Westin in Washington, D.C. This is the first summit focused exclusively on comprehensive population health management approaches that can help children reach their highest levels of health and potential.

Join us in developing new ideas and best practices that engage millennial healthcare consumers and address challenges pediatric providers face in transitioning to value-based care. You’ll learn how population health management strategies can improve care quality for an entire pediatric population in a way that supports your health system’s bottom line.

Speakers at the summit will focus on topics such as:

  • Health policy
  • Care coordination
  • Physician engagement
  • Registries and risk stratification
  • Telehealth
  • Health disparities
  • Taking on risk

Get a sneak peek of the featured Millennial Panel discussion on February 20:

The current and future state of health care from a consumer’s perspective

Health care is a dynamic, constantly evolving entity. This three-person panel plus moderator takes on the consumer point of view to discuss what is and isn’t working in health care today. The panel consists of a pediatrician and mom of a child with Type 1 diabetes and a 15-year-old Type 1 diabetes patient. They’ll share their experiences and thoughts about how they believe health care will progress in the future.

For more information about the 2018 Population Strategies for Children’s Health Summit, please visit our website.

At AAP: addressing the needs of children living in poverty

Lanre Omojokun Falusi, M.D., F.A.A.P., a pediatrician at Children’s National Health System and Associate Medical Director for Municipal and Regional Affairs at Child Health Advocacy Institute (CHAI), will tell attendees of the American Academy of Pediatrics 2016 National Conference that “poverty really is a public health issue.”

For any child, and particularly children living in poverty, adverse experiences during childhood are linked to health conditions that can linger for much of their adult lives.

While pediatricians are challenged by high case loads, Dr. Falusi believes that there is a place within the doctor visit for a discussion about such social determinants of health. Team-based care provides an opening for such conversations.

In some cases, pediatricians may feel out of their element. “It’s a very natural feeling: The best interventions to alleviate poverty are not the issues that doctors are used to working on,” she says. On the other side of the continuum are clinicians who try to take a lion’s share of the load.  “Many pediatricians trained in hospitals that are very work-focused, and even I still fight the urge of saying ‘I myself need to fix this. It’s my job to make their health better.’ ”

But social workers, who are trained in identifying such resources, and nurses are also integral members of the healthcare team. It would be equally natural for a referral to a food pantry or an application for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program to come from these team members.

It’s a shift in mentality, refocusing on the patient’s broader needs that may impact health, rather than the narrow symptoms caused by those health concerns.

AAP 2016 presentation:
Saturday, October 22, 2016

  • I1161- Place Matters: Addressing the Needs of Children in Poverty in Rural and Urban Settings4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.