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Jeffrey Dome

The impact of surveillance imaging to detect relapse in Wilms tumor patients

Jeffrey Dome

Dr. Jeffrey Dome, M.D., Ph.D., vice president, Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders.

The Children’s Oncology Group published an article in the Journal of Clinical Oncology looking at the impact that surveillance imaging has on patients with Wilms tumor (WT), the most common kidney cancer in children.

Despite the risks and costs, the use of computed tomography (CT) for routine surveillance to detect recurrence in patients with WT has increased in recent years. The rationale for using CT scans rather than chest x-rays (CXR) and abdominal ultrasounds (US) is that CT scans are more sensitive, thereby enabling recurrences to be detected earlier.

In this study, led by Jeffrey S. Dome, M.D., Ph.D, vice president of the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s National Health System, researchers conducted a retrospective analysis of patients enrolled in the fifth National Wilms Tumor Study (NWTS-5) who experienced relapse to determine if relapse detection with CT scan correlates with improved overall survival compared with relapse detection by CXR or abdominal US.

A total of 281 patients with favorable-histology WT (FHWT) were included in the analysis. The key findings of the study were that:

  • Among patients with relapse after completion of therapy, outcome was improved in patients whose relapse was detected by surveillance imaging rather after signs and symptoms developed.
  • A higher disease burden at relapse, defined by the diameter of the relapsed tumor and the number of sites of relapse, was associated with inferior survival.
  • Relapses detected by CT scan were detected earlier and were smaller on average than relapses detected by CXR or US.
  • However, there was no difference in survival between patients whose relapse was detected by CT versus CXR or US.

An analysis of radiation exposure levels showed that surveillance regimes including CT scans have about seven times the radiation exposure compared to regimens including only CXR and US. Moreover, the cost to detect each recurrence reduced by 50 percent when CXR and US are used for surveillance.

“The results of this study will be practice changing,” said Dr. Dome, one of the doctors leading the clinical trial. “The extra sensitivity that CT scans provide compared to CXR and US do not translate to improved survival and are associated with the downsides of extra radiation exposure, cost and false-positive results that can lead to unnecessary stress and medical interventions,” he added. “Although counter-intuitive, the more sensitive technology is not necessarily better for patients.”

In conclusion, the doctors found that the elimination of CT scans from surveillance programs for unilateral favorable histology Wilms tumor is unlikely to compromise survival. However, it could result in substantially less radiation exposure and lower health care costs. Overall, the risk-benefit ratio associated with imaging modalities should be considered and formally studied for all pediatric cancers.

Learn more about this research in a podcast from the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Affiliations

Elizabeth A. Mullen, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Boston, MA; Yueh-Yun Chi and Emily Hibbitts, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; James R. Anderson, Merck Research Laboratories, North Wales, PA; Katarina J. Steacy, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD; James I. Geller, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Centre, Cincinnati, OH; Daniel M. Green, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN; Geetika Khanna, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO; Marcio H. Malogolowkin, University of California at Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA; Paul E. Grundy, Stollery Children’s Hospital, University of Alberta, Alberta; Conrad V. Fernandez, University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; and Jeffrey S. Dome, Children’s National Health System, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, D.C.

New treatment approach shows promise for patients with stage IV Wilms tumor

The study assessed the benefit of adding two additional chemotherapy agents, cyclophosphamide and etoposide, to the treatment regimen for patients with incomplete lung nodule response or tumor loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at chromosomes 1p and 16q, both associated with interior outcomes in previous studies.

Wilms tumor, which first develops in the kidneys, is the fifth most common cancer in children under 15 years old. While overall outcomes for patients with Wilms tumor are excellent, patients with metastatic disease, with the lung as the most common site of spread, fare worse than patients with localized disease. That’s why a new study showing significantly improved survival rates for patients with stage IV Wilms tumors with lung metastases is making waves in the pediatric oncology community.

The study, “Treatment of Stage IV Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor With Lung Metastases: A Report From the Children’s Oncology Group AREN0533 Study” – recently published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology with Jeffrey Dome, M.D., Ph.D., vice president for the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s National Health System, as the senior author – assessed whether lung radiation therapy, part of the standard treatment in combination with chemotherapy drugs, can be avoided for patients with complete lung nodule response after six weeks of chemotherapy. Conversely, the study assessed the benefit of adding two additional chemotherapy agents, cyclophosphamide and etoposide, to the treatment regimen for patients with incomplete lung nodule response or tumor loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at chromosomes 1p and 16q, both associated with interior outcomes in previous studies. The results show that:

  • The new approach to therapy resulted in a 4-year overall survival rate of 96 percent, compared to 84 percent on the predecessor study.
  • About 40 percent of patients with Wilms tumor and lung metastases can be spared initial upfront lung radiation and still have outstanding survival. This will decrease the long-term risk of heart toxicity and breast cancer.
  • Patients with incomplete lung nodule response after six weeks of therapy with cyclophosphamide and etoposide had significantly better 4-year event-free survival: 89 percent compared with 75 percent that was expected based on historical data.
  • Intensification of therapy for patients with LOH at 1p and 16q was highly effective: 4-year event-free survival rate improved from 66 percent on the previous study to 100 percent.

“These findings will change clinical practice and improve survival for patients with Wilms tumor whose cancer has spread to the lungs” said Dr. Dome. “The risk-adapted approach to treatment based on tumor biology and tumor response provides a framework for future studies as we come one step closer to achieving 100 percent survival without treatment-associated side effects.”

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New approach improves pediatric kidney cancer outcomes

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Wilms tumor, also known as nephroblastoma, is the most common pediatric kidney cancer, typically seen in children ages three to four. Compared to patients with unilateral Wilms tumors, children with bilateral Wilms tumors (BWT) have poorer event-free survival (EFS) and are at higher risk for later effects such as renal failure. The treatment of BWT is challenging because it involves surgical removal of the cancer, while preserving as much healthy kidney tissue as possible to avoid the need for an organ transplant.

A new Children’s Oncology Group (COG) study published in the September issue of the Annals of Surgery demonstrated an exciting new approach to treating children diagnosed with BWT that significantly improved EFS and overall survival (OS) rates after four years when compared to historical rates. Jeffrey Dome, M.D., Ph.D., Vice President of the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s National Health System, was co-senior author of this first-ever, multi-institutional prospective study of children with BWT.

Historically, patients with BWT have had poor outcomes, especially if they have tumors with unfavorable histology. In this study, Dr. Dome and 18 other clinical researchers followed a new treatment approach consisting of three chemotherapy drugs before surgery rather than the standard two drug regimen, surgical removal of cancerous tissue within 12 weeks of diagnosis, and postoperative chemotherapy that was adjusted based on histology.

The study found that preoperative chemotherapy expedited surgical treatment, with 84 percent of patients having surgery within 12 weeks of diagnosis. The new treatment approach also vastly improved EFS and OS rates for patients participating in the study. The four-year EFS rate was 82.1 percent, compared to 56 percent on the predecessor National Wilms Tumor Study-5 (NWTS-5) study. The four-year OS rate was 94.9 percent, compared to 80.8 percent on NWTS-5.

“I am very encouraged by these results, which I believe will serve as a benchmark for future studies and lead to additional treatment improvements, giving more children the chance to overcome this diagnosis while sparing kidney tissue,” says Dr. Dome.

A total of 189 patients at children’s hospitals, universities and cancer centers in the United States and Canada participated in this study. These patients will continue to be followed for 10 years to track kidney failure rates. This study was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health to the Children’s Oncology Group.