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Lataisia C. Jones on Mission Unstoppable

Getting to know the unstoppable Lataisia C. Jones, Ph.D.

Lataisia C. Jones on Mission Unstoppable

Children’s National Hospital neuroscientist Lataisia C. Jones, Ph.D., appears in the Jan. 18, 2020, edition of Mission Unstoppable, a Saturday morning show aired by CBS that spotlights cutting-edge women leaders in science, technology, engineering and math.

Budding neuroscientist Lataisia C. Jones, Ph.D., is unstoppable. For instance, using everyday items that families can pluck from their own kitchen cabinets, she walks kids through the steps of creating homemade lava lamps. In the process, the youngsters learn a bit of science, like the fact that oil and water do not mix provides the hypnotic magic behind their new lamps.

Jones’ infectious enthusiasm for science that Children’s National Hospital patients and families experience in person during weekly Young Scientist sessions she hosts will be shared nationwide as Jones appears in the Jan. 18, 2020, edition of “Mission Unstoppable.” The half-hour show aired by CBS on Saturday mornings is co-produced by the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and spotlights cutting-edge women leaders in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

“I’m excited,” Jones says of the filming experience. “It’s going to be an amazing opportunity to show kids that there is a fun way of learning. This show is opening a lot of doors and a lot of eyes to the fact that science can be fun.”

Jones’ scientific inquiry focuses on the corpus callosum, a network of fibers centrally located in the middle of the brain that is responsible for transferring information from one lobe to another. Her current research leverages experimental models to better understand brain abnormalities associated with autism spectrum disorder. Or, as she tells CBS viewers, studying the brain helps the field better understand how information is processed in order for people to move, learn and think effortlessly.

Lataisia C. Jones on Mission Unstoppable

“I’m excited,” Jones says of the filming experience. “It’s going to be an amazing opportunity to show kids that there is a fun way of learning. This show is opening a lot of doors and a lot of eyes to the fact that science can be fun.”

In September 2019, Jones was selected to serve as an IF/THEN Ambassador by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society, to inspire the next generation of women pursuing STEM careers. A postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Neuroscience Research lab run by Masaaki Torii, Ph.D., Jones now also serves as a role model for future scientists, connecting with middle school students in person, virtually and via the CBS network television show.

“A lot of my inspiration comes from individuals who I mentor, which also shows that I am learning as well. If I am able to teach science, translate it in different ways to different audiences, I am helping to fulfill my lifelong dream,” she adds. “I always say we all have an inner scientist.”

As the first African American to earn a Ph.D. from Florida State University’s College of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Jones has continued to acquire “first” experiences throughout her academic and professional career. But she’s also motivated to diversify the ranks of science to ensure she’s not the last.

“I am not the normal face you see in science,” she says. “Another reason for me to be stronger and to work harder and get more things done in science is so people who look like me know they can do the same things and know that they’re just as good.”

WATCH: Lataisia C. Jones, Ph.D., explains her research

Kazue Hashimoto-Torii and Masaaki Torii

Center for Neuroscience Research investigators join CIFASD

Kazue Hashimoto-Torii and Masaaki Torii, Collaborative Initiative on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

Masaaki Torii, Ph.D., Kazue Hashimoto-Torii, Ph.D., and their research teams are joining Collaborative Initiative on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, a consortium supported by the National Institutes of Health.

Kazue Hashimoto-Torii, Ph.D., Masaaki Torii, Ph.D., and the research teams they lead have joined a national research consortium for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders that is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The Collaborative Initiative on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (CIFASD) aims to leverage multidisciplinary approaches to develop effective interventions and treatments for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

“Both of our labs have been fortunate in receiving multiple R series research grants from the NIH. I am deeply honored that we now join this prestigious national consortium, which opens additional opportunities to collaborate with other labs with neurobehavioral, genetics and facial dysmorphology expertise as well as other specialized disciplines,” says Hashimoto-Torii, principal investigator in the Center for Neuroscience Research at Children’s National Health System.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders are a constellation of conditions that result from exposure to alcohol in the womb that reflect the vastly different ways fetuses respond to that in utero insult. While early intervention is crucial, one challenge that continues to bedevil the field is trying to determine which pregnancies are most at risk.

“It is crucial to develop early and precise biomarkers for predicting children’s risk for cognitive and behavioral problems,” Hashimoto-Torii says. “Our labs will work on developing a novel approach for identifying such biomarkers.”

The Children’s researchers will examine epigenetic changes at the single cell level that may provide the earliest hint of cognitive and learning difficulties – long before children show any symptoms of such problems. Hashimoto-Torii’s lab will perform single-cell droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based biomarker analysis of blood samples from experimental models and humans. Meanwhile, the lab run by Torii – also a principal investigator in the Center for Neuroscience Research – will collect blood samples from experimental models, perform comprehensive behavioral analysis, and evaluate potential correlations between behaviors seen in the experimental models and their drop-PCR results.

“Under the auspices of CIFASD, we ultimately hope to link these biomarkers from our lab with results that our colleagues are seeing in children in order to validate their ability to accurately predict outcomes from prenatal alcohol exposure,” she says.

Fetal Brain Cells

Tracking environmental stress damage in the brain

Fluorescence Reporter

A team led by Children’s National developed a fluorescence reporter system in an experimental model that can single out neurons that have survived prenatal damage but remain vulnerable after birth.

What’s known

When fetuses are exposed to environmental stressors, such as maternal smoking or alcohol consumption, radiation or too little oxygen, some of these cells can die. A portion of those that survive often have lingering damage and remain more susceptible to further environmental insults than healthy cells; however, researchers haven’t had a way to identify these weakened cells. This lack of knowledge has made it difficult to discover the mechanisms behind pathological brain development thought to arise from these very early environmental exposures, as well as ways to prevent or treat it.

What’s new

A team led by Kazue Hashimoto-Torii, Ph.D., a principal investigator in the Center for Neuroscience Research at Children’s National Health System, developed a marker that makes a protein known as Heat Shock Factor 1 glow red. This protein is produced in cells that become stressed through exposure to a variety of environmental insults. Gestation is a particularly vulnerable time for rapidly dividing nerve cells in the fetal brain. Tests showed that this marker worked not just on cells in petri dishes but also in an experimental model to detect brain cells that were damaged and remained vulnerable after exposure to a variety of different stressors. Tweaks to the system allowed the researchers to follow the progeny of cells that were affected by the initial stressor and track them as they divided and spread throughout the brain. By identifying which neurons are vulnerable, the study authors say, researchers eventually might be able to develop interventions that could slow or stop damage before symptoms arise.

Questions for future research

Q: How do different environmental insults damage brain cells during gestation?
Q: How does this damage translate into pathology in organisms as they mature?
Q: Do the progeny of damaged brain cells retain the same degree of damage as they divide and spread?
Q: Can this new detection system be used to find and track damage in other organs, such as the heart, eye and liver?

Source: Torii, M., S. Masanori, Y.W. Chang, S. Ishii, S.G. Waxman, J.D. Kocsis, P. Rakic and K. Hashimoto-Torii. “Detection of vulnerable neurons damaged by environmental insults in utero.” Published Dec. 22, 2016 by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1620641114