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Children’s National Hospital at the 2021 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting

Attending the 2021 Pediatric Academic Societies meeting this week? There will be over 20 Children’s National Hospital-affiliated participants at this year’s meeting. We have compiled their sessions into a mini schedule:

Name Program/Department Session and role Date Time
Taeun Chang, M.D.  Neonatal Neurology and Neurocritical Care Program PAS Postgraduate Course: Neonatal Neurology: HIE-focused Project-Based (Chair) Friday, 30 April

 

9:00 AM –
4:00 PM
CT
Taeun Chang, M.D. Neonatal Neurology and Neurocritical Care Program PAS Postgraduate Course: Neonatal Neurology: HIE-focused Project-Based (Presenter) Friday, 30 April 9:30 AM – 10:00 AM
CT
Yuan-Chiao Lu, Ph.D. Developing Brain Research Laboratory Cardiology Poster: Care of the Fetus and Newborn with CHD (Presenter) Saturday, May 1 4:30 PM – 4:45 PM
CT
Chidiogo Anyigbo, M.D., M.P.H. General and Community Pediatrics Poster: Health Services Research I (Presenter)

 

Saturday, May 1 5:15 PM – 5:30 PM
CT
Panagiotis Kratimenos, M.D. Neonatology Platform (moderator) Saturday, May 1 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
CT
Sudeepta Basu, MBBS, MS Neonatology Hot Topic Symposia: The Neurological Implications of Abnormal Glycemia in Neonatal Encephalopathy and Prematurity (Chair) Sunday, May 2 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
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Sudeepta Basu, MBBS, MS Neonatology Hot Topic Symposia: The Neurological Implications of Abnormal Glycemia in Neonatal Encephalopathy and Prematurity (Presenter) Sunday, May 2 9:55 AM – 10:15 AM
CT
Ashraf Harahsheh, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.A.A.P.

 

Cardiology Cardiology: Heart Disease in the Older Child Sunday, May 2 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
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Rana F. Hamdy, M.D., MPH, MSCE Infectious Diseases

 

Expanding Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship: Practical Strategies, Novel Settings, and Sociobehavioral Influences (Presenter) Sunday, May 2 10:15 AM – 10:30 AM
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Rana F. Hamdy, M.D., MPH, MSCE Infectious Diseases

 

Hot Topic Debates: Antibiotic Use in Hospitalized Children (Chair) Sunday, May 2 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
CT
John Idso, M.D. Critical Care Poster: Resuscitation and Potpourri (presenter) Sunday, May 2 2:20 PM – 2:30 PM
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Michael Shoykhet, M.D., Ph.D. Critical Care Medicine

 

Critical Care Poster: Resuscitation and Potpourri (presenter) Sunday, May 2 2:20 PM – 2:30 PM
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Panagiotis Kratimenos, M.D. Neonatology Neonatal Neurology: Basic & Translational I (moderator) Sunday, May 2

 

4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
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Monika Goyal, M.D. Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services Injury Prevention (moderator) Sunday, May 2 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
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Ioannis Koutroulis, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A. Genetic Medicine Research

 

Emergency Medicine III (moderator) Tuesday, May 4 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
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Sudeepta Basu, MBBS, MS Neonatology Neonatal Neurology: Clinical: HIE and Other Insults (moderator) Tuesday, May 4 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
CT
Josepheen De Asis-Cruz, M.D., Ph.D. Center for the Developing Brain Neonatal Neurology: Clinical: HIE and Other Insults (presenter) Tuesday, May 4 4:30 PM – 4:45 PM
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Asad Bandealy, M.D., MPH
Priti Bhansali, M.D. Monika Goyal, M.D.
Sabah Iqbal, M.D. Kavita Parikh, M.D. Shilpa Patel, M.D.
Workshop. ThisIsSTILLOurLane: Protect Kids, Not Guns Monday, May 10 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM
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Cara Lichtenstein, M.D. General and Community Pediatrics APA Injury Control/Advocacy Training Combined SIG (SIG Chair) Monday, May 10 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
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Terry Kind, M.D., MPH General and Community Pediatrics

 

APA Women in Medicine / Qualitative Research Combined SIG (SIG Chair) Wednesday, May 12 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM
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Phase I: April-30-May 4 and Phase II: May 10-June 4

PAS 2021 Virtual Schedule

MRI of the patient's head close-up

Early versus late MRI in newborn brain injury

MRI of the patient's head close-up

A single magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed in the first week after birth is adequate to assess brain injury and offer prognostic information in newborn infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) treated with therapeutic hypothermia, according to a new study published in The Journal of Pediatrics.

A collaborative team of neonatology, neurology and neuroradiology experts from Children’s National Hospital that included Gilbert Vezina, M.D., Taeun Chang, M.D., and An N. Massaro, M.D., came together to evaluate the agreement in brain injury findings between early and late MRI in newborn infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) treated with therapeutic hypothermia. The team then compared the ability of early versus late MRI to predict early neurodevelopmental outcomes.

This was a prospective longitudinal study of 49 patients with HIE who underwent therapeutic hypothermia and had MRI performed at both <7 and ≥7 days of age. MRIs were reviewed by an experienced neuroradiologist and assigned brain injury severity scores according to established systems. Scores for early and late MRIs were assessed for agreement using the kappa statistic. The ability of early and late MRI scores to predict death or developmental delay at 15-30 months of age was assessed by logistic regression analyses.

The results of the study found agreement between the early and late MRI was substantial to near perfect (k>0.75, p<0.001) across MRI scoring systems. In cases of discrepant scoring, early MRI was more likely to identify severe injury when compared with late MRI. Early MRI scores were more consistently predictive of adverse outcomes compared with late MRI.

Read the full study in The Journal of Pediatrics.

newborn

Predicting risk for infantile spasms after acute symptomatic neonatal seizures

newborn

Infantile spasms (IS) is a severe epilepsy in early childhood. Early treatment of IS provides the best chance of seizure remission and favorable developmental outcome.

Taeun Chang, M.D., director of the Neonatal Neurology and Neurocritical Care Program at Children’s National Hospital, participated in a study with other national pediatric experts which aimed to develop a prediction rule to accurately predict which neonates with acute symptomatic seizures will develop IS.

The group of researchers found that multiple potential predictors were associated with IS, including Apgar scores, EEG features, seizure characteristics, MRI abnormalities and clinical status at hospital discharge. The final model born from this work included three risk factors: (a) severely abnormal EEG or ≥3 days with seizures recorded on EEG, (b) deep gray or brainstem injury on MRI and (c) abnormal tone on discharge exam.

The significance of these findings is that IS risk after acute symptomatic neonatal seizures can be stratified using commonly available clinical data. No child without risk factors, vs >50% of those with all three factors, developed IS. This risk prediction rule may be valuable for clinical counseling as well as for selecting participants for clinical trials to prevent post‐neonatal epilepsy. This tailored approach may lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment and improve outcomes for a devastating early life epilepsy.

Read the full study in Epilepsia.