Tag Archive for: endocrinology

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Children’s National named to U.S. News & World Report’s Best Children’s Hospitals Honor Roll

US News BadgesChildren’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., was ranked No. 5 nationally in the U.S. News & World Report 2022-23 Best Children’s Hospitals annual rankings. This marks the sixth straight year Children’s National has made the list, which ranks the top 10 children’s hospitals nationwide. In addition, its neonatology program, which provides newborn intensive care, ranked No.1 among all children’s hospitals for the sixth year in a row.

For the twelfth straight year, Children’s National also ranked in all 10 specialty services, with seven specialties ranked in the top 10.

“In any year, it would take an incredible team to earn a number 5 in the nation ranking. This year, our team performed at the very highest levels, all while facing incredible challenges, including the ongoing pandemic, national workforce shortages and enormous stress,” said Kurt Newman, M.D., president and chief executive officer of Children’s National. “I could not be prouder of every member of our organization who maintained a commitment to our mission. Through their resilience, Children’s National continued to provide outstanding care families.”

“Choosing the right hospital for a sick child is a critical decision for many parents,” said Ben Harder, chief of health analysis and managing editor at U.S. News. “The Best Children’s Hospitals rankings spotlight hospitals that excel in specialized care.”

The annual rankings are the most comprehensive source of quality-related information on U.S. pediatric hospitals and recognizes the nation’s top 50 pediatric hospitals based on a scoring system developed by U.S. News.

The bulk of the score for each specialty service is based on quality and outcomes data. The process includes a survey of relevant specialists across the country, who are asked to list hospitals they believe provide the best care for patients with the most complex conditions.

The seven Children’s National specialty services that U.S. News ranked in the top 10 nationally are:

The other three specialties ranked among the top 50 were cardiology and heart surgerygastroenterology and gastro-intestinal surgery, and urology.

DNA

New research on genetic evaluation of short stature, discussed by Andrew Dauber, M.D., M.M.Sc.

DNA

In this study, the authors at Shanghai Children’s Medical Center utilized next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze the data of patients with short stature to better understand the etiologies of short stature.

Andrew Dauber, M.D., M.M.Sc., division chief of Endocrinology at Children’s National Hospital, shared expert commentary on a recent study published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism that explores associated risk factors of short stature as identified by exome sequencing in children.

In this study, the authors at Shanghai Children’s Medical Center utilized next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze the data of patients with short stature to better understand the etiologies of short stature.

The big picture

“This was a large-scale study looking at 814 children with short stature and at least one more clinical feature suggestive of a genetic condition who underwent comprehensive genetic testing at Shanghai Children’s Medical Center,” explains Dr. Dauber. In this study, the authors identified a potential genetic etiology in 361 of the patients, which is 44% of the cohort.

“It is important to note that the yield of genetic testing was highly variable depending on the clinical presentation of the child,” said Dr. Dauber. “For example, patients with associated congenital anomalies or a suspected skeletal dysplasia had a diagnostic yield of 56% and 65% respectively, while patients with isolated severe short stature (defined as a height below -3 SDS) only had a yield of 11%.”

Dr. Dauber noted that the overall high yield is reflective of the types of patients who are referred to this specialty center, and the expected yield in a more general pediatric setting is likely much lower.

The patient benefit

“This study helps shed light on the prevalence of those patients in a large cohort of children presenting for evaluation of short stature,” shared Dr. Dauber. “I am hopeful that targeted treatments will improve growth in these children.”

While this study provides new insights into the underlying causes behind short stature in patients with differing phenotypes, the authors indicate that additional large-scale studies on short stature exome sequencing are warranted.

Moving the field forward

Dr. Dauber also pointed to the fact that the authors note a large number of the patients in this study had undiagnosed Rasopathies, such as Noonan syndrome. “There were also 31 patients with FGFR3 mutations, 6 patients found with ACAN (Aggrecan) mutations and 2 with NPR2 mutations,” said Dr. Dauber.

“At Children’s National, we are currently conducting a clinical trial of vosoritide, a novel growth promoting agent which targets the growth plate in children with selected genetic conditions including Noonan syndrome and patients with mutations in FGFR3, ACAN, and NPR2,” included Dr. Dauber. Preliminary results from this clinical trial were recently presented by Dr. Dauber at the Pediatric Endocrine Society annual meeting.

You can read the full study Clinical Profiles and Genetic Spectra of 814 Chinese Children With Short Stature in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Shideh Majidi

Shideh Majidi, M.D., M.S.C.S, brings focus on psychosocial research in diabetes patients to Children’s National

Shideh Majidi

Dr. Majidi specializes in Type 1 diabetes and has been involved in innovative research studying behavioral and psychosocial aspects of health care such as anxiety, depression and suicide and improving high-risk patient management for children with the disease.

Children’s National Hospital welcomes Shideh Majidi, M.D., M.S.C.S., as the new associate director of the Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes Program. Dr. Majidi specializes in Type 1 diabetes and has been involved in innovative research studying behavioral and psychosocial aspects of health care such as anxiety, depression and suicide and improving high-risk patient management for children with the disease.

Dr. Majidi comes to Children’s National from the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes where, in addition to providing clinical care in the Pediatric Diabetes Division, she was the assistant professor of pediatric endocrinology, head of the depression screening and high-risk task force committees, developer and director of an online class for children managing their Type 1 diabetes and a member of several committees focusing on program evaluation and residency and fellowship recruitment.

When Andrew Dauber, M.D., M.M.Sc., took over the role of division chief of Endocrinology, his goal was to create a clinical endocrinology research program to provide cutting-edge treatment for families. Dr. Dauber is excited to have Dr. Majidi bring her expertise to the team to further this goal. “Dr. Majidi has played a key role in national cooperative research on quality improvement in pediatric diabetes care and is now leading an international collaborative focused on preventing suicide in individuals with Type 1 diabetes,” says Dr. Dauber. “Her compassion, intellect and commitment to improving care for all children with diabetes is an inspiration to us all.”

Dr. Majidi will continue to serve in her roles as site co-lead for Type 1 Diabetes Exchange Quality Improvement Collaborative, where she recently led a 2021 study exploring inequities in access to and outcomes of health care for those with Type 1 diabetes, and  co-chair for RESCUE, which aims to reduce suicide rates among individuals with diabetes.

She is dedicated to meeting patients and families where they are to help provide the best care. “We may think we see a lack of effort in diabetes care from patients and families, but we need to reframe our mindset and dig deeper to determine what barriers are in the way of diabetes management– behavioral, psychosocial or otherwise,” says Dr. Majidi. “When we do this, we can then work on how to help families manage and overcome the barriers that affect their diabetes care.”

aggrecan protein

Two new papers advance aggrecan deficiency research

aggrecan protein

Aggrecan (ACAN) is a large protein found in joint cartilage and growth plates.

Andrew Dauber, M.D., M.M.Sc., division chief of Endocrinology at Children’s National Hospital, and colleagues recently published two papers that describe the phenotypic spectrum of aggrecan deficiency and look at treating the condition with human growth hormone.

Aggrecan (ACAN) is a large protein found in joint cartilage and growth plates. It allows joints to move smoothly and without pain. Aggrecan deficiency — due to heterozygous mutations in the ACAN gene — causes dominantly inherited short stature and, in many patients, early-onset osteoarthritis and degenerative disc disease.

Clinical phenotype of patients with aggrecan deficiency

In 2017, Dr. Dauber led an international consortium of researchers that published a manuscript describing the phenotypic spectrum of 103 individuals – 70 adults and 33 children, including 57 females and 46 males – from 20 families with ACAN mutations. In the study, Dr. Dauber and his colleagues established that short stature and accelerated bone age is common among people with ACAN mutations.

In a new study published in the American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, Dr. Dauber and colleagues further characterize the phenotypic spectrum of aggrecan deficiency, with an emphasis on musculoskeletal health.

Twenty-two individuals from nine families were enrolled in the study. Recorded histories and examinations focused on joint health, gait analysis, joint specific patient reported outcomes and imaging.

“We performed a detailed analysis of the musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with mutations in the aggrecan gene,” says Dr. Dauber. “We found that patients with mutations in this gene had significant short stature which worsened with age. There was a high prevalence of joint complaints and arthritis in adults, and we were able to detect pre-symptomatic joint damage in children using knee MRIs.”

Treating short stature in aggrecan-deficient patients with human growth hormone

Until now, it was unknown how to treat children with aggrecan deficiency. “Providing growth hormone therapy to children with ACAN gene mutations is relatively new in the field of pediatric endocrinology,” explains Dr. Dauber. “Previously, the assumption was that this was just short stature.”

In a new study, published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Dr. Dauber and colleagues reported the results of a trial that evaluated the efficacy and safety of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy on linear growth in children with ACAN deficiency.

“This is the first prospective trial of growth hormone therapy in patients with mutations in the aggrecan gene,” says Dr. Dauber. “Mutations in the gene are the cause for short stature in approximately 2%  of individuals with idiopathic short stature.”

The open-label, single-arm, prospective study enrolled ten treatment-naïve patients with a confirmed heterozygous mutation in ACAN. Participants were treated with rhGH (50 µg/kg/day) over 1 year. Main outcomes measured were height velocity and change in height standard deviation score.

The authors found that growth hormone led to short term improvements in growth rate over the course of the year. The treated patients had their growth rate increase from 5.2 centimeters per year to 8.3 centimeters per year while on therapy.

In 2019, the researchers received the 2019 Human Growth Award at the Pediatric Endocrine Society’s Annual Meeting for an abstract related to this work, entitled “Clinical Characterization and Trial of Growth Hormone in Patients with Aggrecan Deficiency: 6 Month Data.”

Med Games Logo

Continuing medical education through online games

Med Games LogoAndrew Dauber, M.D., MMSc., chief of Endocrinology at Children’s National Hospital, participated as the faculty chair of a Med Games CME educational online activity, to provide continuing medical education for physicians. This game-based activity is intended to meet the educational needs of endocrinologists, endocrine fellows, primary care physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners and health care professionals who diagnose and manage children with growth hormone deficiency (CGHD). This CME educational program is provided by Med Learning Group and supported by an educational grant from Novo Nordisk Inc.

Learn more about the program and test your knowledge: ‘Accurate Diagnosis and Effective Management of Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency: What Can You Do to Improve Patient Outcomes in Your Clinical Practice?’

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For fifth year in a row, Children’s National Hospital nationally ranked a top 10 children’s hospital

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Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., was ranked in the top 10 nationally in the U.S. News & World Report 2021-22 Best Children’s Hospitals annual rankings. This marks the fifth straight year Children’s National has made the Honor Roll list, which ranks the top 10 children’s hospitals nationwide. In addition, its neonatology program, which provides newborn intensive care, ranked No.1 among all children’s hospitals for the fifth year in a row.

For the eleventh straight year, Children’s National also ranked in all 10 specialty services, with seven specialties ranked in the top 10.

“It is always spectacular to be named one of the nation’s best children’s hospitals, but this year more than ever,” says Kurt Newman, M.D., president and CEO of Children’s National. “Every member of our organization helped us achieve this level of excellence, and they did it while sacrificing so much in order to help our country respond to and recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.”

“When choosing a hospital for a sick child, many parents want specialized expertise, convenience and caring medical professionals,” said Ben Harder, chief of health analysis and managing editor at U.S. News. “The Best Children’s Hospitals rankings have always highlighted hospitals that excel in specialized care. As the pandemic continues to affect travel, finding high-quality care close to home has never been more important.”

The annual rankings are the most comprehensive source of quality-related information on U.S. pediatric hospitals. The rankings recognize the nation’s top 50 pediatric hospitals based on a scoring system developed by U.S. News. The top 10 scorers are awarded a distinction called the Honor Roll.

The bulk of the score for each specialty service is based on quality and outcomes data. The process includes a survey of relevant specialists across the country, who are asked to list hospitals they believe provide the best care for patients with the most complex conditions.

Below are links to the seven Children’s National specialty services that U.S. News ranked in the top 10 nationally:

The other three specialties ranked among the top 50 were cardiology and heart surgerygastroenterology and gastro-intestinal surgery, and urology.

vials and needles

Study examines severity of COVID-19 on kids with Type 1 diabetes

vials and needles

A new study published in the Journal of Diabetes, found that although nearly 80% of youth with Type 1 diabetes and COVID-19 infection are managed at home, youth from racial and ethnic minority groups – those with higher hemoglobin A1c values – and those with public insurance are at increased risk for hospitalization.

In a new study published in the Journal of Diabetes, researchers found that although nearly 80% of youth with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and COVID-19 infection are managed at home, youth from racial and ethnic minority groups – those with higher hemoglobin A1c values – and those with public insurance are at increased risk for hospitalization. Most hospitalizations among these youth were related to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) (72%) and 86% of youth hospitalized had an A1c value over 9%. The increased risk for DKA among racial and ethnic minority groups and publicly insured youth in this study is indicative of disparities in T1D outcomes and aligns with other research findings both before and during the pandemic.

Adults with certain underlying medical conditions, like diabetes, are at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Though there are limited data on youth with T1D who have been infected with COVID-19, viral infections can make it harder to control blood glucose levels. If not properly managed, infections may lead to DKA, a serious life-threatening condition where the body converts fat instead of sugar into energy, causing ketones to build up in the blood and acid levels to rise.

“There is still more to learn about COVID-19 and how it affects children with diabetes and other underlying medical conditions,” said Brynn Marks, M.D., MS-HPEd, pediatric endocrinologist at Children’s National Hospital and one of the study’s co-authors. “We are hopeful that this latest data will emphasize the importance of optimizing glycemic control and give physicians and families more information about the virus and T1D so that severe illness and hospitalizations can possibly be prevented.”

In April 2020, the T1D Exchange Quality Improvement Collaborative, along with endocrinology clinics across the U.S., formed a COVID-19 clinical registry to better understand symptoms and outcomes of patients with T1D who also tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection. More than 46 centers nationwide, including Children’s National Hospital, submitted data to this novel registry of 266 youth under the age of 19 with previously established T1D and laboratory confirmed COVID-19.

The study found that nearly 80% of youth with T1D and known COVID-19 infection were cared for at home without any adverse outcomes. It is also important to note that COVID-19 was incidentally discovered in 16% of hospitalized youth admitted for reasons unrelated to COVID-19 or T1D (e.g. urological procedures, psychiatric admissions). However, the data revealed a disproportionate rate of hospitalizations and DKA among racial and ethnic minority groups, children who were publicly insured and those with higher A1c. Out of the 266 patients, 72% of the 61 patients were hospitalized due to DKA. An overwhelming majority (82%) of hospitalized patients had an A1c value greater than 9%. More than 40% of non-Hispanic Black youth in the study were hospitalized as compared to 14% of non-Hispanic white youth. Researchers also noted that those patients with public insurance were less likely to use insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors, emphasizing the continued need to improve more access to diabetes technologies.

“Diabetes technology has advanced rapidly in the last decade and access to insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors is improving, however these technological advances are perpetuating pre-existing disparities in T1D care and outcomes,” Dr. Marks said. “The data is clear and there is a pressing need to act to promote optimal care for all people with T1D.”

Recently, Dr. Marks and the Children’s National Diabetes team became official members of the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange Collaborative. The team looks forward to using the opportunity to improve diabetes care both here at Children’s National and across the country.

 

Gracie Popielarcheck

Raising awareness about Turner Syndrome

Gracie Popielarcheck

Gracie Popielarcheck was diagnosed at age one with Turner Syndrome.

By Roopa Kanakatti Shankar, M.D., M.S., Director of the Turner Syndrome Program at Children’s National Hospital.

The Children’s National  Turner Syndrome Clinic is part of the Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes which is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top 10 programs in the nation. The clinic opened in January 2019 and is the first of its kind in the Washington, D.C., region. A multidisciplinary clinic is held once a month with a team experts in cardiology, endocrinology, psychology, gynecology and genetics to help care for the needs of patients with Turner Syndrome all in one day. The referral network of specialties includes neuropsychology, otolaryngology, audiology, orthopedics, urology and dentistry.

Turner syndrome (TS) is a rare disease affecting girls, with a prevalence of around 25-50 out of every 100,000 females. It is caused by partial or complete loss of the second sex chromosome. This affects multiple organs and can cause heart defects, skeletal abnormalities, hearing loss and learning difficulties. It also affects growth and puberty and can cause infertility. Although the condition was first described in 1938 by Henry Turner, an endocrinologist from Oklahoma, and is well characterized, there is a significant delay in diagnosis and recognition of the condition, especially in milder forms that can still significantly impact the well-being of the individual.

Gracie Popielarcheck with a pet bird

“Having a Turner Syndrome clinic near our city has made life so much easier,” says Gracie’s mom, Leslie Popielarcheck. “We can see all of Gracie’s specialists all in one day and under one roof.”

Families often ask why it took so long to recognize this condition. Many findings can be subtle, the presentation can vary greatly and often short stature may be overlooked in some girls. We now recognize that the classic form (monosomy X) impacts less than half of the girls and the rest have mosaicism (45,X/ 46XX) or other structural abnormalities in the X-chromosome. Recognizing features beyond the classic “short stature, neck webbing, lymphedema and cardiac defects” is indeed important to get timely care for these girls and women across the lifespan. Many have recurrent ear infections and hearing loss. Most have a normal intelligence, and even superior verbal skills but face challenges in visual spatial perception, executive function, working memory and social cognition that impact academic achievement.

13-year-old Gracie Popielarcheck was diagnosed with TS at the age of one after her parents noticed a delay in her speech and development. “We had never heard of Turner Syndrome when Gracie was diagnosed,” says Leslie Popielarcheck, Gracie’s mom. “Gracie didn’t have the classic physical features that girls with Turner Syndrome are known to have.”

With support, most of these girls and women can manage the medical and psychosocial challenges and rise to their full potential. Advances in the field and multidisciplinary care models have helped in the establishment of TS clinics across the country that strive to improve the standard care for these girls.

However, several challenges remain:

  • Improving awareness among primary care physicians in regard to the extended spectrum and variability of presentation at a wide variety of ages
  • Decreasing health disparities and making multidisciplinary clinics and comprehensive care available and accessible even to disadvantaged communities
  • Ensuring adequate medical and social support for transition of young adults and care of adults with Turner syndrome
Gracie P., Kyra Dorfman with Dr. Shankar

Kyra Dorfman, Dr. Shankar and Gracie.

Our TS program, initiated 2 years ago, aims to overcome these challenges and provide care to families impacted by TS in our community. We strive to serve as a Regional Resource for the community as well as physicians in our community and have been recognized by the TSGA (Turner syndrome Global Alliance) as one of only nine clinics nationwide with a Level 4 designation.

“Having a Turner Syndrome clinic near our city has made life so much easier,” Popielarcheck says. “We can see all of Gracie’s specialists all in one day and under one roof.”

As we highlight these resources for the Turner Syndrome Awareness Month this February 2021, and celebrate the strength and tenacity of our beautiful girls, we hope our efforts will improve recognition of the condition and delivery of comprehensive medical care and support to the community we serve.

boy checking his blood glucose

There’s still more to learn about COVID-19 and diabetes

boy checking his blood glucose

Researchers have learned a lot about COVID-19 over the past year and are continuing to learn and study more about this infection caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. There have been many questions about whether COVID-19 affects people with diabetes differently than those without and why this might occur.

Diabetes experts, like Brynn Marks, M.D., M.S.H.P.Ed., endocrinologist at Children’s National Hospital, have been studying the relationship between COVID-19 and diabetes, especially in the pediatric population. Dr. Marks tells us more about what we know so far and further research that needs to be done when it comes to COVID-19 and diabetes.

1.      What do we know about COVID-19 and its effect on people with known diabetes?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) currently lists type 2 diabetes (T2D) as a high risk condition for severe illness related to COVID-19 infection, while stating that adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) might be at increased risk. A recent study from Vanderbilt University found that people with T1D and T2D were at approximately equal risk for complications of COVID-19 infection. As compared to adults without diabetes, adults with T1D and T2D were 3-4 times more likely to be hospitalized and to have greater illness severity. Given these comparable risks, both the American Diabetes Association and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation are lobbying for adults with T1D to be given the same level or priority for COVID-19 vaccines as adults with T2D.

However, as pediatricians, we all know to be wary of extrapolating adult data to pediatrics. Children are less likely to be infected with COVID-19 and if they are, the clinical course is typically mild. To date, there have not been any studies of the impact of COVID-19 on youth with known T2D. Our clinical experience at Children’s National Hospital and reports from international multicenter studies indicate that youth with T1D are not at increased risk for hospitalization from COVID-19 infection. However, paralleling ongoing disparities in T1D care, African Americans with known T1D and COVID-19 infection were more likely to be develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) than their White counterparts.

With the increased use of diabetes technologies, including continuous glucose monitors, insulin pumps and automated insulin delivery systems, diabetes care lends itself well to telemedicine. Studies from Italy during the period of lockdown showed better glycemic control among youth with T1D. Further studies are needed to better understand the implications of telehealth on diabetes care, particularly among those in rural areas with limited access to care.

Brynn Marks

Diabetes experts, like Brynn Marks, M.D., M.S.H.P.Ed., endocrinologist at Children’s National Hospital, have been studying the relationship between COVID-19 and diabetes, especially in the pediatric population.

2.      What do we know about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children with newly diagnosed diabetes?

Nationwide studies from Italy and Germany over the first few months of the pandemic found no increase in the incidence of pediatric T1D during the COVID-19 pandemic as compared to the year before; in fact, the Italian study found that fewer children were diagnosed with T1D during the pandemic. However, many centers are seeing higher rates of DKA and more severe DKA at diagnosis during the pandemic, possibly due to decreased primary care visits and/or fears of contracting COVID-19 while seeking care.

To date, no studies have been published exploring the incidence of T2D in youth. A group from Children’s National, including myself, Myrto Flokas, M.D., Abby Meyers, M.D., and Elizabeth Estrada, M.D., from the Division of Endocrinology and Randi Streisand, Ph.D., C.D.C.E.S. and Maureen Monaghan, Ph.D., C.D.C.E.S., from the Department of Psychology and Behavioral Health, are gathering data to compare the incidence of T1D and T2D during the pandemic as compared to the year before.

3.      Can COVID-19 cause diabetes to develop?

This has been area of great interest, but the jury is still out. The SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19 infection, binds the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor which is located in many tissues throughout the body, including the pancreas. SARS-CoV-2 has been shown to infect pancreatic tissue leading to impaired glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Although the SARS-CoV-2 virus could plausibly cause diabetes, assessment has been complicated by many confounders that could be contributing to hyperglycemia in addition to or rather than the virus itself. Stress-induced hyperglycemia from acute illness, the use of high dose steroids to treat COVID-19 infection, and the disproportionate rates of infection among those already at high risk for T2D, as well as weight gain due to changes in day-to-day life as a result of social distancing precautions are all likely contributing factors.

DNA moleucle

Genetics can’t explain mixed impact of growth hormone therapy

DNA moleucle

Growth hormone therapy is one of the most common treatments for short stature in children. However, endocrinologists report mixed outcomes, even when children have the same underlying condition as the cause of their short stature. Despite research into a variety of potential causes for this unpredictable response, there is still very little scientific evidence to help physicians predict whether children with short stature who are treated with growth hormone will respond to the treatment or not.

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism took up this question with an eye to the genetic factors that might predict response by conducting the first ever genome-wide association study of response to growth hormone.

“Previous disease-specific models have been developed using multiple clinical variables such as parental height, age at treatment start, peak hormone levels and doses, and birth parameters, however, these clinical parameters only partially predict variation in response,” wrote the study authors, including Andrew Dauber, M.D., first author and chief of the division of Endocrinology at Children’s National Hospital. “Our goal was to perform a large-scale genome-wide study to provide a comprehensive assessment of how common genetic variation may play a role in growth hormone response.”

To accomplish this, the study combined five cohorts from across the world to identify 614 individuals for further review. All patients had short stature caused by conditions including growth hormone deficiency, small for gestational age, or idiopathic short stature (no previously identified cause), who received growth hormone as treatment.

Interestingly, the researchers found no overwhelming genetic predictors of response to growth hormone. They did identify a few signals that may potentially play a role in the body’s response to growth hormone but noted those signals will need further exploration. The study also ruled out the idea that genetic predictors of height in the general population might predict response to growth hormone.

“Identifying genetic predictors of how a child with short stature will respond to growth hormone would be an important step forward for clinicians and parents to make informed decisions about the right treatment approach,” says Dr. Dauber. “Though we didn’t find any specific indicators, this large-scale study has allowed us to rule out some previously held assumptions and offers several new avenues to explore.”

The study was conducted in collaboration with Pfizer and Boston Children’s Hospital.

Children's National Endocrinology and Diabetes Division Stats

2020 at a glance: Endocrinology and Diabetes at Children’s National

The Children’s National Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes is consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top programs in the nation.

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Children’s National ranked a top 10 children’s hospital and No. 1 in newborn care nationally by U.S. News

US News Badges

Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., was ranked No. 7 nationally in the U.S. News & World Report 2020-21 Best Children’s Hospitals annual rankings. This marks the fourth straight year Children’s National has made the list, which ranks the top 10 children’s hospitals nationwide.

In addition, its neonatology program, which provides newborn intensive care, ranked No.1 among all children’s hospitals for the fourth year in a row.

For the tenth straight year, Children’s National also ranked in all 10 specialty services, with seven specialties ranked in the top 10.

“Our number one goal is to provide the best care possible to children. Being recognized by U.S. News as one of the best hospitals reflects the strength that comes from putting children and their families first, and we are truly honored,” says Kurt Newman, M.D., president and CEO of Children’s National Hospital.

“This year, the news is especially meaningful, because our teams — like those at hospitals across the country — faced enormous challenges and worked heroically through a global pandemic to deliver excellent care.”

“Even in the midst of a pandemic, children have healthcare needs ranging from routine vaccinations to life-saving surgery and chemotherapy,” said Ben Harder, managing editor and chief of Health Analysis at U.S. News. “The Best Children’s Hospitals rankings are designed to help parents find quality medical care for a sick child and inform families’ conversations with pediatricians.”

The annual rankings are the most comprehensive source of quality-related information on U.S. pediatric hospitals. The rankings recognize the nation’s top 50 pediatric hospitals based on a scoring system developed by U.S. News. The top 10 scorers are awarded a distinction called the Honor Roll.

The bulk of the score for each specialty service is based on quality and outcomes data. The process includes a survey of relevant specialists across the country, who are asked to list hospitals they believe provide the best care for patients with the most complex conditions.

Below are links to the seven Children’s National specialty services that U.S. News ranked in the top 10 nationally:

The other three specialties ranked among the top 50 were cardiology and heart surgery, gastroenterology and gastro-intestinal surgery, and urology.

insulin and syringes

Diabetes clinic helps undocumented children manage their chronic condition

insulin and syringes

A diabetes clinic gives undocumented children with diabetes access to the care they need to maintain their health with this chronic condition.

In 2018, Jennifer Boughton, a social worker at Children’s National Hospital, came up with the idea of starting a diabetes clinic for patients whose immigration status prevented them from qualifying for insurance. The idea came about after undocumented children were arriving in the emergency department with high blood sugar and dangerously elevated ketone levels.

Through donations and the employees, who volunteer their time, Boughton’s idea became a reality. In January of 2019, the diabetes center held its first access clinic. The clinic has been open every three months since then for undocumented children with diabetes.

Flyers for the clinic are sent to local schools and organizations to help recruit patients.

In the first year, the patient volume has quadrupled and the hbA1c levels have decreased for patients who attend.

Read more about the Diabetes Access Clinic here.

 

Nadia Merchant

Working to improve the management of endocrine related conditions

Nadia Merchant

This past fall, Nadia Merchant, M.D., joined Children’s National Hospital as an endocrinologist in the Endocrinology and Diabetes Department. Dr. Merchant received her undergraduate and medical education at Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar. She completed her pediatric residency at Wright State Boonshoft School of Medicine. She then completed her genetics residency and pediatric endocrine fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Merchant was born with acromesomelic dysplasia, a rare genetic disorder, but that hasn’t stopped her from pursuing her medical career. While at Baylor College of Medicine, Dr. Merchant was very active in quality improvement projects, research and organizations that raise awareness of endocrine related conditions. For several years, she was a moderator at Baylor College of Medicine for “From Stress to Strength,” at a course for parents of children with genetic disorders and autism. Dr. Merchant also served as an endocrine fellow representative on the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Endocrinology (SOEn) for the last two years and also served on the committee for a Bone and Mineral special interest group within the Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES). During medical school, she worked with Positive Exposure, an organization that uses visual arts to celebrate human diversity for individuals living with genetic, physical, behavioral and intellectual differences.

During the 2019 Endocrine Society Annual Meeting, Dr. Merchant won the Presidential Poster Award for her poster presentation: Assessing Metacarpal Cortical Thickness as a Tool to Evaluate Bone Density Compared to DXA in Osteogenesis Imperfecta a research project assessing whether hand film is an additional tool to detect low bone mineral density in children.

Dr. Nadia Merchant is currently one of the endocrinologists in the multidisciplinary bone health clinic at Children’s National, a clinic dedicated to addressing and improving bone health in children. Dr. Merchant also manages endocrine manifestations in children with rare genetic disorders.

The Endocrinology department at Children’s National is ranked among the best in the nation by “U.S. News & World Report”.

Brynn Marks

Bringing diabetes technology to patients and providers

Brynn Marks

Brynn Marks, M.D., endocrinologist at Children’s National Hospital, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of five years old and knows too well the struggles that may come with managing this chronic condition. After finding the right, knowledgeable provider as a teen, Dr. Marks realized that she wanted to become an endocrinologist and be that resource and support for others with Type 1.

Developments in diabetes technologies, including continuous glucose monitors (CGM) and insulin pumps, hold great promise for improving diabetes control while also improving quality of life for those living with Type 1. However, the pace of development also presents challenges for busy clinicians who must keep up with rapid developments in the field. Dr. Marks is focused on making sure patients and providers have the latest information and training on diabetes technologies with the goal that they can be more effectively used by more people in the real world.

“These diabetes technologies are very important for kids and teens with diabetes because they can help them to live life as normally as possible while affording the freedom they need to just be kids,” says Dr. Marks.

Dr. Marks’ recent research includes a study where she used an app to deliver medical education about diabetes technology. Participants received authentic, case-based scenarios focused on the technologies to help them apply knowledge of these technologies to real-world clinical scenarios involving insulin pumps and CGMs. All of the education was delivered through questions and explanations in an effort to keep the learners engaged with the curriculum. The questions were repeated over 3-4 months to improve learning and long-term knowledge retention. The study showed that knowledge and confidence about these technologies improved and ultimately led to better patient care.

Dr. Marks presented two posters at a recent International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) meeting related to her efforts to make these technologies more accessible:

Experiential Learning in T1D Technology Education: Knowledge of Parents and Clinicians: Dr. Marks enrolled different groups of learners in the diabetes technology curriculum mentioned above, including parents of children with Type 1 diabetes, attending physicians, pediatric endocrine fellows and certified diabetes educators. Results showed minimal difference among those groups in terms of knowledge about the pumps and CGMs. Interestingly, clinicians who had the opportunity to wear the technologies for educational purposes had greater knowledge than clinicians who did not have the same opportunity. Based on these results, Dr. Marks advocated that opportunities to wear pumps and CGMs should be a routine part of education for clinicians working with these technologies.

A Qualitative Analysis of Clinicians’ Experiences Wearing CGM: Dr. Marks explored the reactions of clinicians without diabetes who were given the opportunity to wear continuous glucose monitors for 1 week. Participants reported that the opportunity to wear these technologies improved their knowledge and gave them greater empathy for patients using CGM.

Dr. Marks’ work to date has identified strategies to improve knowledge about insulin pumps and CGM. Moving forward, she will continue to study the best ways to educate parents and clinicians about these diabetes technologies in hopes of improving the day to day lives of the children they care for.

kidneys with cysts on them

$6M gift powers new PKD clinical and research activities

kidneys with cysts on them

PKD is a genetic disorder characterized by clusters of fluid-filled sacs (cysts) multiplying and interfering with the kidneys’ ability to filter waste from the blood.

When Lisa M. Guay-Woodford, M.D., McGehee Joyce Professor of Pediatrics at Children’s National Hospital, considers a brand-new gift, she likens it to 6 million gallons of “rocket fuel” that will power new research to better understand polycystic kidney disease.

Dr. Guay-Woodford received a $5.7 million dollar gift to support PKD clinical and research activities. PKD is a genetic disorder characterized by clusters of fluid-filled sacs (cysts) multiplying and interfering with the kidneys’ ability to filter waste from the blood. The kidneys’ smooth surface transforms to a bumpy texture as the essential organs grow oversized and riddled with cysts.

The extraordinary generosity got its start in an ordinary clinical visit.

Dr. Guay-Woodford saw a young patient in her clinic at Children’s National a few times in 2015. The child’s diagnosis sparked a voyage of discovery for the patient’s extended family and, ultimately, they attended a presentation she gave during a regional meeting about PKD. That led to a telephone conversation and in-person meeting as they invited her to describe “the white space” between what was being done at the time to better understand PKD and what could be done.

“It’s the power of the art and science of medicine. They come to see people like me because of the science. If we can convey to patients and families that who they are and their unique concerns are really important to researchers, that becomes a powerful connection,” she says. “The art plus the science equals hope. That is what these families are looking for: We give people the latest insights about their disease because information is power.”

The infusion of new funding will strengthen the global initiative’s four pillars:

  • Coordinated care for children and families impacted by renal cystic disease. The Inherited and Polycystic Kidney Disease (IPKD) program, launched September 2019, includes a cadre of experts working together as a team in the medical home so that “in a single, one-stop visit, Children’s National can address the myriad concerns they have,” she explains. A multi-disciplinary team that includes nephrologists, hepatologists and endocrinology experts meets weekly to ensure the Center of Excellence provides the highest-caliber patient care. The team includes genetic counselors to empower families with knowledge about genetic risks and testing opportunities. A nurse helps families navigate the maze of who to call about which issue. Psychologists help to ease anxiety. “There is stress. There is fear. There is pain that can be associated with this set of diseases. The good news is we can control their medical issues. The bad news is some children have difficulty coping. Our psychologists help children cope so they can be a child and do the normal things that children do,” she says.
  • Strengthening global databases to capture PKD variations. The team will expand its outreach to other centers located around the world – including Australia, Europe, India and Latin America – caring for patients with both the recessive and dominant forms of polycystic kidney disease, to better understand the variety of ways the disease can manifest in children. We really don’t know a lot about kids with the dominant form of the disease. How hard should we push to control their blood pressure, knowing that could ease symptoms? What are the ramifications of experiencing acute pain compared with chronic pain? How much do these pain flareups interfere with daily life and a child’s sense of self,” she asks. Capturing the nuances of the worldwide experience offers the power of harnessing even more data. And ensuring that teams collect data in a consistent way means each group would have the potential to extract the most useful information from database queries.
  • Filling a ‘desperate need’ for biomarkers. Developing clinical trials for new therapies requires having biomarkers that indicate the disease course. Such biomarkers have been instrumental in personalizing care for patients with other chronic conditions. “We are in desperate need for such biomarkers, and this new funding will underwrite pilot studies to identify and validate these disease markers. The first bite at the apple will leverage our imaging data to identify promising biomarkers,” she says.
  • Genetic mechanisms that trigger kidney disease. About 500,000 people in the U.S. have PKD. In many cases, children inherit a genetic mutation but, often, their genetic mutation develops spontaneously. Dr. Guay-Woodford’s research about the mechanisms that make certain inherited renal disorders lethal, such as autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, is recognized around the world. The fourth pillar of the new project provides funding to continue her lab’s research efforts to improve the mechanistic understanding of what triggers PKD.

Children’s National ranked No. 6 overall and No. 1 for newborn care by U.S. News

Children’s National in Washington, D.C., is the nation’s No. 6 children’s hospital and, for the third year in a row, its neonatology program is No.1 among all children’s hospitals providing newborn intensive care, according to the U.S. News Best Children’s Hospitals annual rankings for 2019-20.

This is also the third year in a row that Children’s National has been in the top 10 of these national rankings. It is the ninth straight year it has ranked in all 10 specialty services, with five specialty service areas ranked among the top 10.

“I’m proud that our rankings continue to cement our standing as among the best children’s hospitals in the nation,” says Kurt Newman, M.D., President and CEO for Children’s National. “In addition to these service lines, today’s recognition honors countless specialists and support staff who provide unparalleled, multidisciplinary patient care. Quality care is a function of every team member performing their role well, so I credit every member of the Children’s National team for this continued high performance.”

The annual rankings recognize the nation’s top 50 pediatric facilities based on a scoring system developed by U.S. News. The top 10 scorers are awarded a distinction called the Honor Roll.

“The top 10 pediatric centers on this year’s Best Children’s Hospitals Honor Roll deliver outstanding care across a range of specialties and deserve to be nationally recognized,” says Ben Harder, chief of health analysis at U.S. News. “According to our analysis, these Honor Roll hospitals provide state-of-the-art medical expertise to children with rare or complex conditions. Their rankings reflect U.S. News’ assessment of their commitment to providing high-quality, compassionate care to young patients and their families day in and day out.”

The bulk of the score for each specialty is based on quality and outcomes data. The process also includes a survey of relevant specialists across the country, who are asked to list hospitals they believe provide the best care for patients with challenging conditions.

Below are links to the five specialty services that U.S. News ranked in the top 10 nationally:

The other five specialties ranked among the top 50 were cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, gastroenterology and gastro-intestinal surgery, orthopedics, and urology.

DNA Molecule

Using genomics to solve a 20-year case study

DNA Molecule

“The advent of different technologies and techniques over the years allowed pieces of her diagnosis to be made – and then brought all together,” says Andrew Dauber, M.D., MMSc.

After 20 years, a patient’s family received an answer to a decades-long genetic mystery. Their daughter had two rare disorders, Angelman syndrome and P450scc deficiency, which was detected after researchers found out she had uniparental disomy, two copies of chromosome 15 from one parent and none from another.

The research paper, entitled “Adrenal Insufficiency, Sex Reversal and Angelman Syndrome due to Uniparental Disomy Unmasking a Mutation in CYP11A1,” was published on March 22, 2018, and recognized as the best novel insight paper published by Hormone Research in Paediatrics in 2018, announced at the Pediatric Endocrine Society’s Annual Meeting in Baltimore on Saturday, April 27, 2019.

By using a variety of genetic tools, including whole-exome sequencing, microarray analyses and in-vitro modeling for gene splicing, the researchers were able to confirm this patient had uniparental disomy, a recessive genetic condition. They learned that after she received two impaired copies of chromosome 15 from her father, this woman developed a hormonal problem that led to adrenal insufficiency and sex reversal. This explained why she physically presented as a female, despite having testes and a Y-chromosome. It also explained other symptoms, including developmental delays and seizures.

“It’s a unique conglomeration of symptoms, manifested by the combination of these two very rare disorders,” says Andrew Dauber, M.D., MMSc., the division chief of endocrinology at Children’s National Health System and a guiding research author of this study. “The advent of different technologies and techniques over the years allowed pieces of her diagnosis to be made – and then brought together, commencing a 20-year diagnostic odyssey.”

For example, each of the conditions this patient has is known and rare: Angelman syndrome affects about one in 10 to 20,000 people in the U.S. Typical symptoms include those observed in this patient: delayed development, intellectual disability, speech impairment and seizures. Side-chain cleavage disorder, which leads to adrenal disorders and sex reversal, is also very rare. In 2005 the chances of survival with a P450scc defect were slim, but since then more than 28 infants have been diagnosed with this gene deficiency, which is required to convert cholesterol to pregnenolone, a hormone in the adrenal gland.

Dr. Dauber notes the chances of this occurring again are highly unlikely. The odds here are one in a gazillion. In this case, one disorder unmasked another, leaving researchers with new insights into the methodology for unraveling ultra-rare genetic disorders or for more common rare conditions.

“Knowing about the gene that caused the adrenal insufficiency and understanding this etiology won’t change medical care for this patient, but it will change the way researchers think about genetic detective work and about combining different technologies,” says Dr. Dauber. “We know that genetic disorders can be complex presentations of different disorders combined. This patient didn’t have one disorder, but three.”

When asked about the significance of the award, Dr. Dauber notes that, “It’s not that other people haven’t recognized this concept before, but this case is a striking example of it. Different technologies will unveil different types of genetic changes, which is why you have to use the right technology or the right technologies in the right combination to piece together the whole picture.”

Ahlee Kim, M.D., the lead study author and a clinical research fellow at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, will receive the award and the honorarium.

Additional study authors include Masanobu Fujimoto, Ph.D., Vivian Hwa, Ph.D., and Philippe Backeljauw, M.D., from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.

The research was supported by grant K23HD07335, awarded to Dr. Dauber, from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Additional funding included grant 1UL1TR001425 from the NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

Test tube that says IGF-1 test

A new algorithm: Using genomics and EHR to detect severe growth disorders

Test tube that says IGF-1 test

Andrew Dauber, M.D., MMSc., a pediatric endocrinologist and the chief of endocrinology at Children’s National, guided research presented at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, enabling clinicians and researchers to understand the genetic underpinnings of certain pediatric growth disorders, while using electronic health record (EHR) algorithms to screen for presenting symptoms in the exam room. In some cases, this prompts further genetic testing and shortens the diagnostic odyssey for pediatric growth disorders – such as Turner syndrome.

Here is a summary of the research findings, delivered as two oral abstracts and a poster session.

ABSTRACT 1: Presented on Saturday, March 23, at 12:30 p.m. CST

Healthy childhood growth cohort provides insight into PAPPA2 and IGF-1 relationship, revealing a new level of complexity to the biology of growth with implications for the study and treatment of severe growth disorders

Program: Growth, puberty, and insulin action and resistance

Session OR07-5: A Cross-Sectional Study of IGF-I Bioavailability through Childhood: Associations with PAPP-A2 and Anthropometric Data

Background: Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a hormone essential for human growth and is often bound to IGFBP-3, an IGF binding protein. Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein-A2 (PAPP-A2) cleaves intact IGFBP-3, freeing IGF-1 to support normal growth functions. This is the first study, led by Dr. Andrew Dauber with collaborators from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, to track PAPP-A2 and intact IGFBP-3 concentrations throughout childhood. The research team studied 838 healthy children, ages 3-18, in the Cincinnati Genomic Control Cohort, to better understand patterns of growth and development by examining the relationship between PAPPA2 and IGF-1 bioavailability.

Study results: Free IGF-1 increased with age. PAPP-A2, a positive modulator of IGF-1 bioavailability, decreased with age, which surprised the researchers, and is not positively associated with absolute levels of free IGF-1. However, higher levels of PAPP-A2 cleave IGFBP-3 resulting in lower levels of intact IGFBP-3, and consequently, increasing the percentage of free to total IGF-1. This demonstrates that PAPP-A2 is a key regulator of IGF-1 bioavailability on a population-wide scale.

Impact: This research may help endocrinologists create unique, targeted treatment for children with PAPPA2 mutations and could help stratify patients with potential risk factors, such as IGF-1 resistance due to increased binding of IGF-1, associated with severe growth and height disorders. See adjoining study below.

Watch: Video interview with Dr. Dauber

ABSTRACT 2: Presented on Saturday, March 23, at 12:45 p.m. CST

Electronic health records can alert physicians to patients who could benefit from genetic testing to identify severe growth disorders

Program: Growth, puberty, and insulin action and resistance

Session OR07-6: Integrating Targeted Bioinformatic Searches of the Electronic Health Records and Genomic Testing Identifies a Molecular Diagnosis in Three Patients with Undiagnosed Short Stature

Background: Despite referrals to pediatric endocrinologists and extensive hormonal analysis, children with short stature due to a genetic cause, may not receive a diagnosis. Electronic health records may help identify patients – based on associated phenotypes and clinical parameters – who could benefit from genetic testing.

Study results: Researchers from three children’s hospitals – Boston Children’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center – gathered data, starting small, with a known variable, or phenotype, associated with severe growth disorders: insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) resistance. A targeted bioinformatics search of electronic health records led the team to identify 39 eligible patients out of 234 candidates who met the criteria for a possible genetic-linked growth disorder. Participants were included if their height fell below two standard deviations for age and sex and if their IGF-1 levels rose above the 90th percentile. Patients who had a chronic illness, an underlying genetic condition or precocious puberty were excluded. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on DNA extracted from willing participants, including 10 patients and their immediate family members. The research team identified new genetic causes in three out of 10 patients with severe growth disorders, who were previously missed as having a genetic-linked growth disorder.

Note: Two patients had two novel IGF1R gene variants; a third had a novel CHD2 variant (p. Val540Phe). The two patients with IGF1R variants had a maternally inherited single amino acid deletion (p.Thr28del) and a novel missense variant (p. Val1013Phe).

Impact: Similar EHR algorithms can be replicated to identify pediatric patients at risk for or thought to have other genetic disorders, while expanding genetic research and improving patient care.

Watch: Video interview with Dr. Dauber

POSTER: Presented on Monday, March 25, at 1 p.m. CST

Electronic health record alerts could help detect Turner syndrome, shorten diagnostic odyssey for girls born with a missing or partially-deleted X chromosome

Program: Session P54. Pediatric puberty, ovarian function, transgender medicine and obesity

Poster Board #MON-249: Algorithm-Driven Electronic Health Record Notification Enhances the Detection of Turner Syndrome

Background: Turner syndrome (TS) results from a complete or partial loss of the second X chromosome and affects about one in every 2,500 female births. TS is common in females with unexplained short stature, but the diagnosis is often not made until late childhood (8-9 years), leading to delays in treatment and screening for comorbidities, such as heart conditions, chronic ear infections, vision problems and challenges with non-verbal learning. Using electronic health record (EHR) alarms can help clinicians screen for and diagnose TS patients earlier in life.

Study results: Researchers from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center searched EHRs for female patients with idiopathic short stature who met the team’s selection criteria: Their height fell below two standard deviations from the mean for age as well as one standard deviation below the mid-parental height, had a BMI greater than 5 percent and did not have a chronic illness. The search produced 189 patients who met the diagnostic criteria, 72 of whom had not received prior genetic testing. Out of genetic samples available, 37 were compatible for a microarray analysis – which helped the team identify two cases of TS and a third chromosomal abnormality, all of which were missed by routine clinical evaluation.

Impact: DNA samples may not be available for all patients, but clinicians and researchers can identify and integrate tools into EHR’s – creating their own algorithms. An example includes setting up alerts for specific growth parameters, which helps identify and screen patients for TS.

The abstracts Dr. Dauber and his team discuss at ENDO 2019 support ongoing research, including a partnership among four leading children’s hospitals – Children’s National Health System, Boston Children’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Cincinnati Children’s Medical Center – funded by an R01 grant to study how electronic health records can detect and identify novel markers of severe growth disorders.

The researchers hope their findings will also identify and help screen for comorbidities associated with atypical growth patterns, supporting multidisciplinary treatment throughout a child’s life. The study started in August 2018 and includes three sets of unique diagnostic criteria and will analyze WES from dozens of patients over five years.

Read more about Dr. Dauber’s research presented at ENDO 2019 in Endocrine Today and watch his video commentary with Medscape.

little girl being examined by doctor

First Washington-based Turner syndrome clinic opens Jan. 28

little girl being examined by doctor

Endocrinologists at Children’s National work with a team of cardiologists, gynecologists, geneticists, psychologists and other clinicians to provide comprehensive and personalized care for girls with Turner syndrome.

Starting Monday, Jan. 28, 2018 girls with Turner syndrome will be able to receive comprehensive and personalized treatment at Children’s National Health System for the rare chromosomal condition that affects about one in 2,500 female births.

Many girls with Turner syndrome often work with a pediatric endocrinologist to address poor growth and delayed puberty, which may be treated with human growth hormone and estrogen replacement therapy. They may also need specialty care to screen for and treat heart defects, frequent ear infections, hearing loss, vision problems and challenges with non-verbal learning.

Roopa Kanakatti Shankar, M.D., M.S., a pediatric endocrinologist at Children’s National, aims to consolidate this treatment with a comprehensive Turner syndrome clinic.

“We’re creating a place that girls with Turner syndrome can come to receive specialized and personalized treatment, while feeling supported,” says Dr. Shankar.

Patients can now schedule visits and meet with multiple specialists in one clinic location:

The multispecialty referral team includes neuropsychologists, otolaryngologists (ear, nose and throat doctors), orthopedics, urology and dentistry to address unique medical needs. Families can also schedule appointments with audiology and get labs and other studies on the same day.

As girls with Turner syndrome age, they are at increased risk for diabetes, an underactive thyroid and osteoporosis, which is one reason Dr. Shankar wants to educate and increase awareness early on.

“There is something special about girls with Turner syndrome,” says Dr. Shankar. “They are very inspiring and endearing to work with,” she adds, reflecting on her past research and future goals with the clinic. “Their perseverance in the face of challenges is one of the things that inspires me to work in this field.”

The Turner syndrome clinic at Children’s National meets the criteria for a level 2 clinic designation by the Turner Syndrome Global Alliance by providing coordinated medical care, same-day visits with multiple specialists and connecting patients with advocacy groups.

Within the next two years, Dr. Shankar looks forward to meeting level 4 criteria, the designation for a regional resource center, by adding multi-institutional research partners, mentoring programs and organizing a patient-family advisory council.

“As we start out, we aim to provide excellent clinical care and create a database while forming these partnerships, and over time, we hope this information will influence future research studies and foster a greater depth of tailored care,” says Dr. Shankar. “Our ultimate goal is to treat, support and empower girls with Turner syndrome to achieve their full potential.”

To learn more about the Turner syndrome clinic, available on the fourth Monday of every month, visit ChildrensNational.org/endocrinology.