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Dr. Lauri Tosi examines a patient

Building patient-centered outcomes research in osteogenesis imperfecta

Dr. Lauri Tosi examines a patient

Children’s orthpaedic surgeon Laura Tosi, M.D., is the co-lead on a program to improve patient-centered outcomes research and education in osteogenesis imperfecta that recently received a Eugene Washington Engagement Award of $250,000 from the Patient-Centered Outcomes and Research Institute (PCORI).

Children’s orthpaedic surgeon Laura Tosi, M.D., is the co-lead on a program to improve patient-centered outcomes research and education in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that recently received a Eugene Washington Engagement Award of $250,000 from the Patient-Centered Outcomes and Research Institute (PCORI). Dr. Tosi serves as project co-lead alongside colleagues Tracy Hart, project lead, from the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation (OIF) and Bryce Reeve, Ph.D., co-project lead, director of the Center for Health Measurement at Duke University.

The project, which will be housed at the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation, will run for two years and seeks to:

  • Create a community of stakeholders (patients/caregivers/clinicians/researchers) who are trained or training in patient-centered outcomes research, with specific attention to priority topics identified by the OI community.
  • Expand communications and education strategies related to patient-centered outcomes research to enhance the care of the OI community.
  • Establish and extend the capacity among patients, caregivers, clinicians and researchers in OI to participate in both patient-centered outcomes research and comparative effectiveness activities.
  • Develop an OI-specific toolkit focused on disseminating evidence-based clinical care recommendations to stakeholders and care providers, based on sustainable input from the OI community.
  • Extended the reach of these activities to support other rate bone disease communities.

Osteogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic disorders causing connective tissue dysfunction and bone fragility. It is the most common of nearly 450 rare skeletal disorders and affects an estimated 25,000 to 50,000 people in the U.S. Collecting the patient’s perspective about natural history, clinical best practices, quality of life and research priorities is challenging because, like so many rare diseases, the affected population is relatively small and  geographically dispersed.

“We hope this project will give us the ability to develop a set of best practices for care and research based on research that incorporates the patient’s point-of-view,” says Dr. Tosi. “I’m excited to work with this team and begin to change how we think about and care for OI patients and their families.”

Andrew Dauber

Andrew Dauber, M.D., MMSc, caps off research success with award and reception

Andrew Dauber

Unfortunately, we’ve been notified that the ENDO2020 conference has been canceled due to concerns of COVID-19. Becuase of this, we will not be hosting our reception in honor of Andrew Duaber, M.D., on Sunday, March 29.

We hope to see you at a future Endocrinology or Pediatric Endocrinology event.

Children’s National Hospital is incredibly proud of the work Dr. Dauber has done in the endocinology community.

Andrew Dauber, M.D., MMSc, division chief of Endocrinology at Children’s National Hospital, will be awarded the 2020 Richard E. Weitzman Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award at ENDO 2020. The prestigious award will be presented at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in recognition of Dauber’s work in understanding the regulation of growth and puberty, and applying innovative genetic technologies to studying pediatric endocrinology. Dauber credits many collaborators throughout the world, as well as the team at Children’s National for the award.

With a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Dauber and colleagues from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Boston Children’s Hospital and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia are using electronic health records to identify children who likely have rare genetic growth disorders. Using cutting-edge DNA sequencing technologies, including whole exome sequencing, the researchers are aiming to identify novel genetic causes of severe growth disorders. The first paper describing genetic findings in patients with high IGF-1 levels was published in Hormone Research in Paediatrics in December 2019.

Dauber and researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center are exploring how to treat patients with mutations in the PAPPA2 gene. In 2016, the group described the first patients with mutations in this gene who had decreased the bioavailability of IGF-1, stunting their growth and development. In their current phase of research, findings are emphasizing the importance of this gene in regulating IGF-1 bioavailability throughout childhood. The ultimate aim is to create therapies to increase IGF-1 bioavailability, thereby supporting healthy growth and development in children. Their first study to track PAPPA2 and intact IBGBP-3 concentrations throughout childhood was published in the European Journal of Endocrinology in January 2020.

Dauber is particularly interested in studying children with dominantly inherited forms of short stature. Along with collaborators in Cincinnati, he currently has an ongoing treatment trial using growth hormone in patients with Aggrecan gene mutations.  Dauber hopes to announce soon a new clinical trial for children with all forms of dominantly inherited short stature.

Study upon study has shown us that there are many factors that affect an individual’s height and growth. As these studies and the conversation around how to identify and address genomic anomalies become more prevalent, the team at Children’s National is increasingly interested in engaging with other centers around the country. In the coming months, the Children’s National Research & Innovation Campus will open on the grounds of the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center, which will serve as a one-of-a-kind pediatric research and innovation hub. A critical component to this campus is the co-location of Children’s National research with key partners and incubator space.

Nadia Merchant

Working to improve the management of endocrine related conditions

Nadia Merchant

This past fall, Nadia Merchant, M.D., joined Children’s National Hospital as an endocrinologist in the Endocrinology and Diabetes Department. Dr. Merchant received her undergraduate and medical education at Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar. She completed her pediatric residency at Wright State Boonshoft School of Medicine. She then completed her genetics residency and pediatric endocrine fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Merchant was born with acromesomelic dysplasia, a rare genetic disorder, but that hasn’t stopped her from pursuing her medical career. While at Baylor College of Medicine, Dr. Merchant was very active in quality improvement projects, research and organizations that raise awareness of endocrine related conditions. For several years, she was a moderator at Baylor College of Medicine for “From Stress to Strength,” at a course for parents of children with genetic disorders and autism. Dr. Merchant also served as an endocrine fellow representative on the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Endocrinology (SOEn) for the last two years and also served on the committee for a Bone and Mineral special interest group within the Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES). During medical school, she worked with Positive Exposure, an organization that uses visual arts to celebrate human diversity for individuals living with genetic, physical, behavioral and intellectual differences.

During the 2019 Endocrine Society Annual Meeting, Dr. Merchant won the Presidential Poster Award for her poster presentation: Assessing Metacarpal Cortical Thickness as a Tool to Evaluate Bone Density Compared to DXA in Osteogenesis Imperfecta a research project assessing whether hand film is an additional tool to detect low bone mineral density in children.

Dr. Nadia Merchant is currently one of the endocrinologists in the multidisciplinary bone health clinic at Children’s National, a clinic dedicated to addressing and improving bone health in children. Dr. Merchant also manages endocrine manifestations in children with rare genetic disorders.

The Endocrinology department at Children’s National is ranked among the best in the nation by “U.S. News & World Report”.

Albert Oh

Albert Oh, M.D., receives 2020 Emerging Leader Award from the ACPA

Albert Oh

Albert Oh, M.D., Director of the Cleft and Craniofacial Program at Children’s National Hospital.

The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association (ACPA) recognized Albert Oh, M.D., with the 2020 Emerging Leader Award. This award is given to professionals who have been members of ACPA between three to 15 years, and who exhibit exemplary accomplishments and dedication to the issues affecting people with cleft and craniofacial conditions.

The ACPA is an association consisting of professionals who treat and/or perform research on cleft and craniofacial conditions. The nonprofit organization also supports those affected through education and resources through its ACPA Family Services program.

As the director of the Cleft and Craniofacial Program at Children’s National Hospital, Dr. Oh is a leader in the research, surgical treatment and holistic care of cleft and craniofacial patients. He has published over 75 peer-reviewed scientific articles and book chapters. Dr. Oh’s current research interests include the outcomes and safety of cleft and craniofacial procedures, 3-D analysis of craniofacial morphology, Pierre Robin sequence and vascular anomalies.

Dr. Oh says that “It is an honor to be recognized by the ACPA and to share their mission of advancing research and improving outcomes for all those affected by cleft and craniofacial conditions.”

Dr. Oh will be presented with his award during the ACPA’s 77th Annual Meeting in Portland, Or.

Gilbert Vezina

Gilbert Vezina, M.D., recognized with American Society of Pediatric Neuroradiology Gold Medal Award

Gilbert Vezina

Gilbert Vezina, M.D., Director of Neuroradiology in the Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology at Children’s National Hospital, is being recognized at the 2020 American Society of Pediatric Neuroradiology 2nd Annual Meeting with the society’s most distinguished honor, the Gold Medal Award.

The American Society of Pediatric Neuroradiology (ASPNR) Gold Medal is awarded for both professional and personal excellence, honoring individuals who are superb pediatric neuroradiologists, scientists, and/or physicians, and mentors and who also are truly outstanding people. Recipients have consistently extended themselves beyond self-interest to make contributions to the field of pediatric neuroradiology and as such, have elevated the subspecialty. This medal recognizes the exceptional service and achievements of these individuals.

Dr. Vezina completed his undergraduate degree at the Collège Jean-de-Brébeuf, Montréal, Canada and medical school at McGill Medical School, Montréal, Canada. He completed a mixed internship at Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Canada; residency in Diagnostic Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts followed by a fellowship in Neuroradiology, Boston, Massachusetts.

He began his career at Children’s National Hospital in 1990. He is currently the Director of the Neuroradiology Program at Children’s National Hospital and Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics at George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington DC. He created the Neuroradiology Fellowship Program in 1993 where he impacted medical students, residents and fellows from around the world. He served as president of ASPNR from 2001-2002 and past President from 2002-2005. He also served as the Interim Chief, Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology at Children’s National for a brief period in 2017.

Congratulations, Dr. Vezina!

Dr. Jonas and research collaborator Nobuyuki Ishibashi in the laboratory.

Cardiac surgery chief recognized for studies of surgery’s impacts on neurodevelopment

Dr. Jonas and research collaborator Nobuyuki Ishibashi in the laboratory.

Dr. Jonas and research collaborator Nobuyuki Ishibashi in the laboratory.

Richard Jonas, M.D., is this year’s recipient of the Newburger-Bellinger Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Award in recognition of his lifelong research into understanding the impact of cardiac surgery on the growth and development of the brain. The award was established in 2013 by the Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Outcome Collaborative (CNOC) to honor Jane Newburger and David Bellinger, pioneers in research designed to understand and improve neurodevelopmental outcomes for children with heart disease.

At Children’s National, Dr. Jonas’ laboratory studies of neuroprotection have been conducted in conjunction with Dr. Vittorio Gallo, director of neuroscience research at Children’s National, and Dr. Nobuyuki Ishibashi, director of the cardiac surgery research laboratory. Their NIH-supported studies have investigated the impact of congenital heart disease and cardiopulmonary bypass on the development of the brain, with particular focus on impacts to white matter, in people with congenital heart disease.

Dr. Jonas’s focus on neurodevelopment after cardiac surgery has spanned his entire career in medicine, starting with early studies in the Harvard psychology department where he developed models of ischemic brain injury. He subsequently undertook a series of highly productive pre-clinical cardiopulmonary bypass studies at the National Magnet Laboratory at MIT. These studies suggested that some of the bypass techniques used at the time were suboptimal. The findings helped spur a series of retrospective clinical studies and subsequently several prospective randomized clinical trials at Boston Children’s Hospital examining the neurodevelopmental consequences of various bypass techniques. These studies were conducted by Dr. Jonas and others, in collaboration with Dr. Jane Newburger and Dr. David Bellinger, for whom this award is named.

Dr. Jonas has been the chief of cardiac surgery and co-director of the Children’s National Heart Institute since 2004. He previously spent 20 years on staff at Children’s Hospital Boston including 10 years as department chief and as the William E. Ladd Chair of Surgery at Harvard Medical School.

As the recipient of the 2019 award, Dr. Jonas will deliver a keynote address at the 8th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Outcome Collaborative in Toronto, Ontario, October 11-13, 2019.

Rohan Kumthekar and Charles Berul

Rohan Kumthekar wins AAP’s Cardiology Research Fellowship Award

Rohan Kumthekar and Charles Berul

Dr. Kumthekar and Charles Berul, M.D., chief of Cardiology, discuss less invasive approaches for infants who require pacemaker and defibrillator placements.

Efforts to develop surgical approaches that would eliminate the need for complex, open surgery when placing pacemakers in tiny infants and young children has earned cardiology fellow Rohan Kumthekar, M.D., the American Academy of Pediatrics Cardiology Research Fellowship Award.

“Placing a pacemaker in a small child is different than operating on an adult, due to their small chest cavity and narrow blood vessels,” said Dr. Kumthekar in a 2018 interview about the proof of concept study for this work. “By eliminating the need to cut through the sternum or the ribs and fully open the chest to implant a pacemaker, the current model, we can cut down on surgical time and help alleviate pain.”

“We hope that this approach to lead placement eliminates the need for surgery in this group of pediatric patients,” he further explains in the 2019 award announcement. “This research could have a transformative impact in changing the current clinical standard for pacemaker and ICD implantation in pediatric patients by converting an open surgical approach to a minimally invasive procedure.”

The award, which is supported by the Children’s Heart Foundation, provides research support for an individual who has demonstrated aptitude for basic science or clinical science research during their pediatric cardiology fellowship.

Tania Ahluwalia

Simulation curriculum for emergency medicine trainees in India

Tania Ahluwalia

“It is essential to equip emergency physicians in India with these necessary skills so they can provide the best acute care for children and help the country overcome its burden of pediatric illness. This project focuses on simulation training because it is a very effective way to practice clinical and communication skills,” says Tania Ahluwalia, M.D., FAAP.

India has a high burden of pediatric illness, and close to 1 million children die each year.

Despite those staggering public health challenges, pediatric emergency medicine training remains in its infancy in India. Tania Ahluwalia, M.D., FAAP, associate director of Global Health Programs, Division of Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services at Children’s National Hospital has been working with the Ronald Reagan Institute of Emergency Medicine to help address that training gap.

“It is essential to equip emergency physicians in India with these necessary skills so they can provide the best acute care for children and help the country overcome its burden of pediatric illness. This project focuses on simulation training because it is a very effective way to practice clinical and communication skills,” Dr. Ahluwalia says.

Each October a team led by Dr. Ahluwalia teaches Pediatric Emergency Medicine modules in India based on a three-year curriculum.  In October 2019, they will focus on neonatology. And thanks to a 2019-2020 Global Health Initiative Exploration in Global Health Award presented during Research and Education Week at Children’s National, over two weeks Dr. Ahluwalia will visit various cities in India with a team that includes:

  • Kaitlyn Boggs, M.D., a second-year pediatric resident at Children’s National
  • Camilo Gutierrez, M.D., Children’s National Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services
  • Simone Lawson, M.D., Children’s National Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services
  • Shobhit Jain, Kansas City
  • Shiva Kalidindi, Nemours Children’s Hospital
  • Manu Madhok, Minneapolis

For the study, about 80 trainees participating in postgraduate emergency medicine training programs in India will practice skills, such as intubating a patient, using the same medical equipment and mannequins of the same size as pediatric patients. The trainees will review several pediatric emergency medicine cases that were developed based on a needs assessment at partner programs in India. First, visiting faculty members will watch videos developed by Dr. Ahluwalia, Michael Hrdy, M.D., and Rachael Batabyal, M.D., and will review literature on how to conduct simulation in a developing country.

Faculty teaching neonatology, use of simulation modules and other pediatric emergency medicine training topics will visit Bangalore, Bhubaneswar, Dehradun, Delhi, Kochi, Kolkata, Kozhikhode, Madurai and Mumbai. (Kate Douglass, M.D., of the George Washington University and Serkan Toy, Ph.D., an educational psychologist at John Hopkins University, have been heavily involved in this project but will not travel to India in October.)

“My passion is global education so, for me, this project will be a success if we improve the trainees’ comfort, knowledge and skill at providing patient care after undergoing this simulation-based curriculum. We also want to improve our faculty’s capacity to teach through these simulation modules, so there are definitely learning opportunities for both U.S. teachers and Indian trainees,” she adds.

WATCH: Introduction to simulation training
WATCH: Performing a simulation learning event
WATCH: Debriefing tools

Financial support for research described in this post was provided by the 2019-2020 Global Health Initiative Exploration in Global Health Award.

M and her daughter

Tracing the history of aggrecan gene mutations

M and her daughter

M takes a photo with her daughter in Washington, where they learned they have an ACAN gene mutation that causes short stature.

On Sunday, April 28, 2019 a team of researchers received the 2019 Human Growth Award at the Pediatric Endocrine Society’s Annual Meeting for their abstract, entitled “Clinical Characterization and Trial of Growth Hormone in Patients with Aggrecan Deficiency: 6 Month Data,” and presented this at the PES Presidential Poster Session.

Eirene Alexadrou, M.D., a fellow at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, accepted the award and honorarium, while ongoing research is underway. This study started in 2017, with the objective of characterizing the phenotypic spectrum and response to a standardized regimen of growth hormone in a small cohort of 10 patients and their families.

In 2017, Andrew Dauber, M.D., MMSc., the division chief of endocrinology at Children’s National Health System, led an international consortium of researchers in publishing a manuscript describing the phenotypic spectrum of 103 individuals – 70 adults and 33 children, including 57 females and 46 males – from 20 families with aggrecan gene (ACAN) mutations.

Dr. Dauber and his colleagues have established that short stature and accelerated bone age is common among people with ACAN mutations. In a review of retrospective data, including patients treated with a variety of growth-promoting therapies at varying doses, the research team found that over the first one, two and three years of treatment, the standard deviation scores (SDS) for height increased by .4, .7 and 1, respectively. The current abstract now describes seven children enrolled in a prospective standardized trial of growth hormone therapy. After six months of treatment, the children have increased their height SDS by an average of 0.46.

Additionally, the researchers are performing an in-depth look at the joint effects, including special MRIs of the knees. They found that two of the children had a problem with their knee cartilage called osteochondritis dissecans. They had not yet presented with clinical symptoms. The researchers hope that early intervention with physical therapy can help prevent significant joint disease in the future.

M and her mother and daughter in Cincinnati

M, her daughter, and M’s mother take a photo in Cincinatti, where they are pariticipating in a clinical trial for aggrecan deficiency.

“Providing growth hormone therapy to children with ACAN gene mutations is relatively new in the field of pediatric endocrinology,” notes Dr. Dauber. “Previously, the assumption was that this was just short stature. We’ll continue to diagnose ACAN mutations in a clinical setting and work with families to reduce the risk of complications, such as joint problems or early-onset arthritis, which may co-occur with this gene mutation.”

As an example, Dr. Dauber met an 8-year-old patient several months ago who presented with symptoms of short stature. The patient is healthy, confident and still growing so her mother wasn’t worried about her but she made the appointment to see if there was an underlying cause to her daughter’s short stature. Her family history revealed clues to an ACAN mutation, which was later confirmed through genetic tests. Her mom, M, stands 4’8; her grandmother is 4’9. Her great grandmother was short and her great, great grandfather was 5’1. Short stature and joint problems run in the family. Once M mentioned she had osteochondritis dissecans and a hip replacement, she provided a textbook case study for carrying the ACAN mutation.

After the appointment, M shared the news with her mother about the possibility of having aggrecan deficiency. After taking genetic tests, M, her mother and M’s daughter learned they all have the ACAN mutation, and enrolled in the study that Dr. Dauber is guiding. Suddenly, it all made sense. After examining family photos, they traced the ACAN mutation back through four generations.

They could tell what relatives had an altered copy of the ACAN gene. M had it, while her two sisters did not. M’s mother was an only child, so she didn’t have aunts or uncles to compare her mother’s height to, but M’s grandmother was short, while her grandmother’s brother was average height. Although her mother’s family was from Germany, she learned that there is no specific ancestry associated with this mutation. It happens by chance and is passed down from a single parent to, on average, half of their children, a form of genetic inheritance called autosomal dominant transmission.

Ms great grandmother and grandfather

M’s great grandfather was noticeably shorter than her great grandmother, who was 5’4.

Through further research, M learned that the ACAN gene provides instructions for producing aggrecan protein, which is essential for bone growth, as well as for the stability of cartilage that lines bones and joints, explaining her recurring joint problems.

She also looked into the future, examining potential risk factors for her daughter: joint pain and bone conditions, which could contribute to arthritis, hip dysplasia and back problems.

The diagnosis now makes it easier for M and her daughter to favor bone-building activities that are easy on the joints, like swimming or water aerobics, instead of gymnastics and weight lifting. After having a hip replacement, M was careful to supplement with calcium and vitamin D. Now, she’ll take the same steps to ensure optimal bone health for her daughter. She’ll work with orthopedic specialists as her daughter grows into her pre-teen and adolescent years, carefully monitoring joint pain – altering activities that are tough on the joints, as necessary.

M let her daughter make a decision about growth hormone therapy, which she decided to try. The benefits of the treatment, increased height, carry inconveniences, such as taking daily shots, but they are sticking with it.

“We’re at the tip of the iceberg with research that explores this gene mutation,” says Dr. Dauber. “We’ll continue to study these families, and more, over time to assess growth patterns and  gene expression, which may reveal other mutations associated with short stature or joint problems, and guide future treatment options. It was a coincidence that this family had the ACAN mutation and scheduled an appointment, while we’re conducting this study. Otherwise, they may not have had an answer since this is fairly new research.”

M and her daughter are happy to be part of this study, which they will participate in for the next few years. M’s mother is also glad to participate. She made a different choice, decades ago, to reject hormone treatment when it was offered to her for undiagnosed short stature, but she’s sharing genetic clues, which may influence treatment options for her granddaughter and for her family’s next generation.

The original study, “Clinical Characterization of Patients with Autosomal Dominant Short Stature due to Aggrecan Muations,” appeared in the Feb. 2017 issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, and published as an online advance on Nov. 21, 2016.

Thirty-six researchers collaborated on this original paper, which was funded by 16 international health institutes and foundations, including the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health, the Swedish Research Council, the Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems, the Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, the Stockholm County Council, the Swedish Society of Medicine, Byggmastare Olle Engkvist’s Foundation, the Sao Paulo Research Foundation, the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science, the Czech Health Research Council and the Ministry of Health, Czech Republic.

Billie Lou Short and Kurt Newman at Research and Education Week

Research and Education Week honors innovative science

Billie Lou Short and Kurt Newman at Research and Education Week

Billie Lou Short, M.D., received the Ninth Annual Mentorship Award in Clinical Science.

People joke that Billie Lou Short, M.D., chief of Children’s Division of Neonatology, invented extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, known as ECMO for short. While Dr. Short did not invent ECMO, under her leadership Children’s National was the first pediatric hospital to use it. And over decades Children’s staff have perfected its use to save the lives of tiny, vulnerable newborns by temporarily taking over for their struggling hearts and lungs. For two consecutive years, Children’s neonatal intensive care unit has been named the nation’s No. 1 for newborns by U.S. News & World Report. “Despite all of these accomplishments, Dr. Short’s best legacy is what she has done as a mentor to countless trainees, nurses and faculty she’s touched during their careers. She touches every type of clinical staff member who has come through our neonatal intensive care unit,” says An Massaro, M.D., director of residency research.

For these achievements, Dr. Short received the Ninth Annual Mentorship Award in Clinical Science.

Anna Penn, M.D., Ph.D., has provided new insights into the central role that the placental hormone allopregnanolone plays in orderly fetal brain development, and her research team has created novel experimental models that mimic some of the brain injuries often seen in very preterm babies – an essential step that informs future neuroprotective strategies. Dr. Penn, a clinical neonatologist and developmental neuroscientist, “has been a primary adviser for 40 mentees throughout their careers and embodies Children’s core values of Compassion, Commitment and Connection,” says Claire-Marie Vacher, Ph.D.

For these achievements, Dr. Penn was selected to receive the Ninth Annual Mentorship Award in Basic and Translational Science.

The mentorship awards for Drs. Short and Penn were among dozens of honors given in conjunction with “Frontiers in Innovation,” the Ninth Annual Research and Education Week (REW) at Children’s National. In addition to seven keynote lectures, more than 350 posters were submitted from researchers – from high-school students to full-time faculty – about basic and translational science, clinical research, community-based research, education, training and quality improvement; five poster presenters were showcased via Facebook Live events hosted by Children’s Hospital Foundation.

Two faculty members won twice: Vicki Freedenberg, Ph.D., APRN, for research about mindfulness-based stress reduction and Adeline (Wei Li) Koay, MBBS, MSc, for research related to HIV. So many women at every stage of their research careers took to the stage to accept honors that Naomi L.C. Luban, M.D., Vice Chair of Academic Affairs, quipped that “this day is power to women.”

Here are the 2019 REW award winners:

2019 Elda Y. Arce Teaching Scholars Award
Barbara Jantausch, M.D.
Lowell Frank, M.D.

Suzanne Feetham, Ph.D., FAA, Nursing Research Support Award
Vicki Freedenberg, Ph.D., APRN, for “Psychosocial and biological effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction intervention in adolescents with CHD/CIEDs: a randomized control trial”
Renee’ Roberts Turner for “Peak and nadir experiences of mid-level nurse leaders”

2019-2020 Global Health Initiative Exploration in Global Health Awards
Nathalie Quion, M.D., for “Latino youth and families need assessment,” conducted in Washington
Sonia Voleti for “Handheld ultrasound machine task shifting,” conducted in Micronesia
Tania Ahluwalia, M.D., for “Simulation curriculum for emergency medicine,” conducted in India
Yvonne Yui for “Designated resuscitation teams in NICUs,” conducted in Ghana
Xiaoyan Song, Ph.D., MBBS, MSc, “Prevention of hospital-onset infections in PICUs,” conducted in China

Ninth Annual Research and Education Week Poster Session Awards

Basic and Translational Science
Faculty:
Adeline (Wei Li) Koay, MBBS, MSc, for “Differences in the gut microbiome of HIV-infected versus HIV-exposed, uninfected infants”
Faculty: Hayk Barseghyan, Ph.D., for “Composite de novo Armenian human genome assembly and haplotyping via optical mapping and ultra-long read sequencing”
Staff: Damon K. McCullough, BS, for “Brain slicer: 3D-printed tissue processing tool for pediatric neuroscience research”
Staff: Antonio R. Porras, Ph.D., for “Integrated deep-learning method for genetic syndrome screening using facial photographs”
Post docs/fellows/residents: Lung Lau, M.D., for “A novel, sprayable and bio-absorbable sealant for wound dressings”
Post docs/fellows/residents:
Kelsey F. Sugrue, Ph.D., for “HECTD1 is required for growth of the myocardium secondary to placental insufficiency”
Graduate students:
Erin R. Bonner, BA, for “Comprehensive mutation profiling of pediatric diffuse midline gliomas using liquid biopsy”
High school/undergraduate students: Ali Sarhan for “Parental somato-gonadal mosaic genetic variants are a source of recurrent risk for de novo disorders and parental health concerns: a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis”

Clinical Research
Faculty:
Amy Hont, M.D., for “Ex vivo expanded multi-tumor antigen specific T-cells for the treatment of solid tumors”
Faculty: Lauren McLaughlin, M.D., for “EBV/LMP-specific T-cells maintain remissions of T- and B-cell EBV lymphomas after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation”

Staff: Iman A. Abdikarim, BA, for “Timing of allergenic food introduction among African American and Caucasian children with food allergy in the FORWARD study”
Staff: Gelina M. Sani, BS, for “Quantifying hematopoietic stem cells towards in utero gene therapy for treatment of sickle cell disease in fetal cord blood”
Post docs/fellows/residents: Amy H. Jones, M.D., for “To trach or not trach: exploration of parental conflict, regret and impacts on quality of life in tracheostomy decision-making”
Graduate students: Alyssa Dewyer, BS, for “Telemedicine support of cardiac care in Northern Uganda: leveraging hand-held echocardiography and task-shifting”
Graduate students: Natalie Pudalov, BA, “Cortical thickness asymmetries in MRI-abnormal pediatric epilepsy patients: a potential metric for surgery outcome”
High school/undergraduate students:
Kia Yoshinaga for “Time to rhythm detection during pediatric cardiac arrest in a pediatric emergency department”

Community-Based Research
Faculty:
Adeline (Wei Li) Koay, MBBS, MSc, for “Recent trends in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area”
Staff: Gia M. Badolato, MPH, for “STI screening in an urban ED based on chief complaint”
Post docs/fellows/residents:
Christina P. Ho, M.D., for “Pediatric urinary tract infection resistance patterns in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area”
Graduate students:
Noushine Sadeghi, BS, “Racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of sexual health services among adolescent females”

Education, Training and Program Development
Faculty:
Cara Lichtenstein, M.D., MPH, for “Using a community bus trip to increase knowledge of health disparities”
Staff:
Iana Y. Clarence, MPH, for “TEACHing residents to address child poverty: an innovative multimodal curriculum”
Post docs/fellows/residents:
Johanna Kaufman, M.D., for “Inpatient consultation in pediatrics: a learning tool to improve communication”
High school/undergraduate students:
Brett E. Pearson for “Analysis of unanticipated problems in CNMC human subjects research studies and implications for process improvement”

Quality and Performance Improvement
Faculty:
Vicki Freedenberg, Ph.D., APRN, for “Implementing a mindfulness-based stress reduction curriculum in a congenital heart disease program”
Staff:
Caleb Griffith, MPH, for “Assessing the sustainability of point-of-care HIV screening of adolescents in pediatric emergency departments”
Post docs/fellows/residents:
Rebecca S. Zee, M.D., Ph.D., for “Implementation of the Accelerated Care of Torsion (ACT) pathway: a quality improvement initiative for testicular torsion”
Graduate students:
Alysia Wiener, BS, for “Latency period in image-guided needle bone biopsy in children: a single center experience”

View images from the REW2019 award ceremony.

Johannes Van den Anker

Dr. Johannes van den Anker awarded 2019 Sumner J. Yaffe Lifetime Achievement Award

Johannes Van den Anker

Johannes van den Anker, M.D., Ph.D., division chief of Clinical Pharmacology and vice chair of Pediatrics for Experimental Therapeutics at Children’s National Health System, has been selected to receive the 2019 Sumner J. Yaffe Lifetime Achievement Award in Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics by the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG). Given annually, the Yaffe Award was established in 2002 by the PPAG Board of Directors and recognizes individuals with significant and sustained contributions toward the improvement of children’s health through the field of pediatric pharmacology and therapeutics.

Dr. van den Anker was selected as this year’s recipient for his contributions to the field of pediatric pharmacology and therapeutics, which have expanded and enhanced medical knowledge about the use of drugs in children and about the treatment of disease. He has also played an integral role in training the next generation of clinical pharmacists and pharmacologists.

“This award means a lot to me as it recognizes the importance of the field I am so passionate about and to which I have dedicated my career,” says Dr. van den Anker.

Dr. van den Anker joined Children’s National in 2002 and has become a leader in the discipline of pediatric pharmacology and therapeutics with significant contributions to research in this field. Some of his work includes changes in the dosing guidelines for frequently used antibacterial agents in newborns, the optimization of the dosing of pain medications in newborns and young infants and studies addressing the pharmacology of drugs in obese pediatric and adolescent patients.

“I am excited about being the 2019 recipient of this award” Dr. van den Anker says, “I am enthusiastic about future developments in the field of pediatric pharmacology and therapeutics with multiple ongoing studies with my colleagues, ranging from antibiotic dosing to the management of muscular dystrophy with novel drugs.”

The award will be presented at the 28th PPAG Annual Meeting on Friday, April 12 in Oklahoma City, OK., where he will also present the 2019 Yaffe Award Lecture to the attendees. The title of his lecture is “The Evolution of Neonatal Pharmacology and Therapeutics:  A Story of Resistance, Resilience and Revelation”.

Congratulations to Dr. Johannes van den Anker for this highly deserved honor!

Kofi Essel, M.D., M.P.H. and Ankoor Shah, M.D., M.B.A., M.P.H., named among 40 Under 40 Leaders in Minority Health

Ankoor Shah and Kofi Essel

Ankoor Shah, M.D., M.B.A., M.P.H., and Kofi Essel, M.D., M.P.H., were named 40 Under 40 Leaders in Minority Health.

Two doctors from Children’s National Health System are among the recipients of the 40 Under 40 Leaders in Minority Health award by the National Minority Quality Forum (NMQF) for 2019. Kofi Essel, M.D., M.P.H., is a pediatrician, Ankoor Shah, M.D., M.B.A., M.P.H., is the medical director of the IMPACT DC Asthma Clinic and also a pediatrician at Children’s National.

Founded in 1998, the NMFQ is dedicated to ensuring that high-risk racial and ethnic populations and communities receive optimal health care. The 40 individuals selected for this award represent the next generation of thought leaders in reducing health disparities.

Dr. Kofi Essel is a pediatrician at the Children’s Health Center Anacostia.  His focus and research has been around health equity, obesity, food insecurity and nutrition.

“Hunger strikes so many of our families,” says Dr. Essel, “In D.C., we were number one in the nation for having the highest rate of food hardship in households with children.”

Dr. Essel is involved with many organizations and initiatives that raise awareness about hunger and how much of an issue it is.  He strives to be a partner for the families that he serves, many of whom are in the fight against obesity, and works alongside them to improve their overall health.

“It’s a huge honor to receive recognition from this national organization,” says Dr. Kofi Essel, “Ultimately, it allows us to have a bit more of a platform to continue to advance some of the great work we’re doing with health disparities.”

Dr. Ankoor Shah is the medical director for IMPACT DC asthma clinic and a pediatrician at the Children’s Health Center at THEARC.  His focus includes improving pediatric population health and reducing child health asthma disparities.

“Through the coordination of the best in class care at Children’s National with amazing on the ground community partners, we have been able to transform the lives of the most at-risk children with asthma” says Dr. Shah.

Dr. Shah collaborates with organizations to improve the outcomes of kids with asthma by targeting intervention in high-risk areas.

“This award is recognition of the great work we’re doing in terms of improving asthma health in high-risk child populations throughout the District of Columbia.”

Both Dr. Essel and Dr. Shah are from Arkansas, attended Emory University and they did their residency together at Children’s National.

Congratulations to these wonderful doctors and leaders for receiving this award.

The 40 Under 40 recipients received their awards at the 2019 NMQF Leadership Summit on Health Disparities and CBC Spring Health Braintrust Gala Dinner on April 9.

Thurlow Evans Tibbs, Jr. Award

Community-based AIDS prevention organization recognizes Children’s National Health System

Thurlow Evans Tibbs, Jr. Award

Credit: Don Bon Photography

The Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine at Children’s National Health System was honored with the Thurlow Evans Tibbs, Jr. Award for outstanding service in HIV prevention by Us Helping Us, People Into Living, a community-based AIDS service organization committed to reducing HIV infection in the African American community on April 2, 2019 in Washington, D.C.

“We are so honored to receive the Thurlow Evans Tibbs, Jr. Award from our colleagues and friends, Us Helping Us, People Into Living,” said Dr. Lawrence D’Angelo, director of the Youth Pride Clinic and Burgess Clinics, a division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine at Children’s National. “We have always considered Us Helping Us as an essential partner in this struggle and so it’s ingrained as a part of the community. It has been our honor to work with them, and an equal honor to be recognized in this way by them. We are so grateful and so proud!”

Dr. Lawrence D’Angelo and his team at the Burgess Clinic have cared for over 750 HIV infected youth, many who have gone on to live long and productive lives since the clinic opened its doors in 1988. The clinic started the Washington Area Consortium on HIV infection in Youth (WACHIVY) which later became MetroTeenAIDS Metro TeenAIDS, one of the largest and most successful prevention education programs for youth in the country. The Burgess Clinic is the home of over a dozen NIH and foundation grants that supported the diagnosis and treatment of HIV infected youth, accounting for over $55M in support.

“Receiving the Thurlow Evans Tibbs, Jr. Award from Us Helping Us, People Into Living is an honor beyond anything we could have hoped for,” says Dr. D’Angelo. “Our programs were started at the same time to meet similar needs and for years we have worked together and appreciated each other’s efforts in serving our community. D.C. could not have attained the progress it has made in the struggle against HIV without Us Helping Us, People Into Living and knowing that makes this award all the more special.”

Us Helping Us, People Into Living was incorporated in 1988 as a support group for HIV-positive black gay men.

Randi Streisand

Randi Streisand, Ph.D. to be honored with the Michael C. Roberts Award for Outstanding Mentorship

Randi Streisand

Randi Streisand, Ph.D., chief of Psychology and Behavioral Health at Children’s National Health System, will be honored with the Michael C. Roberts Award for Outstanding Mentorship by the  Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP), a Division of the American Psychological Association. This award honors pediatric psychology faculty who go above and beyond to mentor students and provide professional advice and guidance through students’ various training phases.

The Society of Pediatric Psychology will present the award at their Annual Conference held on Apr. 4-6, 2019 in New Orleans, La.

Streisand was selected for the award based on her exceptional mentorship in the areas of research, clinical work and overall career development through graduate school, postdoctoral fellowships and early career stages.

“I’m very honored to be selected for this distinguished award,” says Streisand. “Working with students, fellows and junior faculty members has been the highlight of my career. I really enjoy helping guide people on their own career paths. I have been fortunate to mentor many truly talented individuals, several of whom I now get to work with as valued colleagues.”

Streisand has served as a primary mentor on funded career development awards, research fellowships and dissertations. Her impressive track record of mentoring behavioral researchers has benefited six faculty members by moving Children’s fellows into tenure-track and clinical faculty positions. Furthermore, her research assistants have been accepted into leading graduate programs in psychology and health including the University of Florida, Loyola University Chicago, Georgia State University and UT Southwestern Medical Center.

“Dr. Streisand’s approach to mentorship is comprehensive, and she goes the extra mile for each intern, colleague and researcher she works with,” says Roger J. Packer, M.D., senior vice president at Children’s Center of Neuroscience and Behavioral Medicine. “She has already made a major impact on the field of pediatric psychology through her superb mentorship and will continue to do so for the years to come.”

Rebecca Cady

Rebecca Cady named Health Care Risk Management Professional of the Year by ASHRM

Rebecca Cady

Rebecca Cady, vice president and chief risk officer at Children’s National Health System, is the recipient of the 2018 American Society for Health Care Risk Management (ASHRM ) Professional of the Year award. Cady’s dedication to advancing the risk management industry has been demonstrated through her commitment to innovation in the face of industry challenges.

Recently, she directed the implementation process for reporting safety incidents via a mobile app created by RL Solutions. Children’s National was one of the early adopters of the mobile app technology that has allowed staff to instantaneously provide feedback about unsafe conditions directly from their smartphones.

“The mobile app enables staff to report an event quickly so that it doesn’t get lost or forgotten and something can be done about it,” Cady says. “We already were working on a project to increase incident reporting, so integrating the mobile app was an important addition for providers looking to report issues of concern.”

Cady is in charge of the Children’s National enterprise risk management department and management of their litigation program; including serving as counsel to the compliance officer and Human Resources. She also oversees operations of Children’s clinical risk management program, ombudsman program, workers’ compensation program and the insurance program; including managing the organization’s captive insurance company.

Her approach consistently applies diverse tools and strategies of risk management, such as enterprise risk management (ERM), strategic risk management, risk financing and insurance. At Children’s National, she has built an ERM infrastructure that enables faster understanding of risk management and adoption by staff at all levels. This led to adopting incident reporting on mobile devices and resulted in overall improvements in hospital performance.

Previously, Cady served as interim vice president, chief compliance and privacy officer at Children’s National. Prior to joining Children’s National, she was a partner at Grace Hollis Lowe Hanson & Schaeffer LLP.

Desiree de la Torre

Desiree de la Torre named to The Daily Record’s 2018 VIP List

Desiree de la Torre

Desiree de la Torre, MPH, MBA, director of Community Affairs and Population Health Improvement at Children’s National, has been named one of The Daily Record’s 2018 VIP List — Very Important Professionals Successful by 40 awards.

The VIP List recognizes professionals 40 years of age and younger who have been successful in Maryland. Winners, chosen by a panel of previous VIP List honorees and business leaders, were selected on the basis of professional accomplishments, community service and commitment to inspiring change.

“I’m so happy to be selected as a 2018 Very Important Professionals (VIP) Successful by 40 winner,” says Desiree. “My parents instilled in me the importance of hard work, giving back to my community and a commitment to inspiring change – exactly what this award is about! When I first received the news, I called my parents because I owe my success to them.”

As director of Community Affairs and Population Health Improvement at Children’s National, Desiree leads the organization’s community health improvement strategic planning process, including support for community organizations, health equity and compliance with federal and local community benefit regulations. She is responsible for the development of new models of care that improve the health of populations and impact the social determinants of health. This includes multi-sector collaborations with community organizations, schools, government agencies and payers.

Desiree is a member of several local and national councils and associations. She holds a master’s degree in Public Health from Boston University, a master’s degree in Business Administration from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor’s degree in Psychobiology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Desiree will be honored along with other awardees at a reception in September, hosted by The Daily Record.

Larry D'Angelo SAMH award

Larry D’Angelo, M.D., M.P.H., receives the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine’s 2018 Outstanding Achievement Award

Larry D'Angelo SAMH award

Larry D’Angelo, M.D., M.P.H., emeritus Chief of the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine  at Children’s National Health System is being honored by the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM) with their most prestigious award, the 2018 Outstanding Achievement in Adolescent Health and Medicine.

The award acknowledges Dr. D’Angelo’s career-long dedication to adolescents and adolescent health care. Dr. D’Angelo is a pioneer in the care of and research for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients, spending the past 35 years working to treat youth and adults with HIV/AIDS in the Washington area. As part of his work, Dr. D’Angelo founded and directed the Burgess Clinic for HIV-infected adolescents at Children’s National, the Youth Pride Clinic for LGBTQ health at Children’s National and the community-based organization, Metro TeenAIDS, currently part of the Whitman Walker Clinic.

Dr. D’Angelo was presented the award on March 15, 2018 at the SAHM’s Annual Meeting in Seattle.

“This is a tremendous honor that serves to validate not me and my work, but the collective efforts of everyone I’ve worked with here at Children’s National. I couldn’t have achieved anything without those in my Division nor without my colleagues across the institution.” Dr. D’Angelo says.

Dr. D’Angelo, an internationally recognized expert in adolescents and adolescent health care, is also emeritus executive director for The Diana L. and Stephen A. Goldberg Center for Community Pediatric Health and a senior scientist with the District of Columbia Center for AIDS Research’s Clinical and Population Sciences Core.  His academic appointments include professor Pediatrics, Medicine, Epidemiology, and Prevention and Community Health at The George Washington University.

Dorothy Bulas

Congratulations to Dorothy Bulas, M.D. – 2017 RSNA Outstanding Educator recipient

Dorothy Bulas

Dorothy Bulas, M.D., section head of ultrasound and fetal imaging at Children’s National Health System, was honored with the RSNA 2017 Outstanding Educator award at the Radiological Society of North America’s (RSNA) Annual Meeting, held November 26 – December 1 in Chicago, Illinois.

The winner of the award is selected annually by the RSNA Board of Directors based on the awardee’s significant contributions and long-term commitment – 15 years or more – to radiologic education.

“In addition to being a talented clinician and an accomplished researcher, Dr. Bulas is an extraordinary teacher who has made tireless contributions to the educational programs of RSNA,” said RSNA President Richard L. Ehman, M.D. “For more than three decades, she has been a passionate and effective advocate for improving pediatric radiology worldwide – especially in poorly served countries – by participating in educational outreach.”

Children’s National earns five awards at the 2017 SPR Annual Meeting

Radiology PULSE Suite

Several technologists, fellows and faculty in the Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology at Children’s National Health System were recognized at the 2017 Society of Pediatric Radiology (SPR) Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada, May 16-20. Each year, the international conference recognizes society members for outstanding research and education in pediatric care on the topics of imaging and image-guided care. Out of 15 major awards, Children’s National staff earned five, including two Caffey Awards – SPR’s most prestigious awards for academic excellence.

The awards received are as follows:

The Society of Pediatric Radiology Caffey Award for Best Clinical Research Paper went to attending radiologist, Dorothy Bulas, M.D., for her clinical research paper titled, “CXR Reduction Protocol in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) – Lessons Learned,” which highlighted collaboration with the NICU team to reduce the reliance on x-rays to monitor neonates. This method decreases the radiation dose with no risk to the patient.

The Society of Pediatric Radiology Caffey Award for Educational Exhibit was given to Benjamin Smith, M.D., a pediatric radiology fellow, for his educational poster “Sonographic Evaluation of Diaphragmatic Motion: A Practical Guide to Performance and Interpretation.” The exhibit displayed a unique technique for examining the motion of the diaphragm using ultrasound to make an accurate diagnosis of diaphragm paralysis or motion. Dr. Smith’s exhibit was also recognized by The American Academy of Pediatrics and was given the Outstanding Clinical Education Poster Award along with radiologist Hansel Otero, M.D.; sonographer Tara K. Cielma, R.D.M.S, R.D.C.S, R.V.T.; and faculty member Anjum N. Bandarkar, M.D.

The Society of Pediatric Radiology Radiographer Best Poster Award was given to Dr. Bandarkar for her poster titled, “Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis: Value of measurement technique to avoid equivocal exam.” The World Federation of Pediatric Imaging also awarded Dr. Bandarkar, Adebunmi O. Adeyiga, M.D. and Tara Cielma the 2017 Outstanding Radiographer Educational Poster Award for their collaborative poster on, “A Sonographic Walk‐Through: Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis.”

Division Chief of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Raymond Sze, M.D., remarked, “This is a major win not only for the department but also for the entire hospital. The support and collaboration of our Children’s National colleagues across many departments allowed us to advance the field of pediatric imaging and earn national recognition for the high-quality and impactful research and education that’s happening at our institution.”

Kathleen Gorman named AHA’s Grassroots Champion for D.C.

Kathleen Gorman

Kathleen Gorman, MSN, RN, FAAN

Kathleen Chavanu Gorman, M.S.N., R.N., FAAN, executive vice president of Patient Care Services and chief operating officer at Children’s National Health System, recently received the American Hospital Association (AHA) 2017 Grassroots Champion Award for Washington D.C.

The recognition highlights the achievements of grassroots leaders and honors one hospital leader from each state for their hard work over the previous year to effectively deliver key hospital and health care messages to elected officials; broaden the base of community support for hospitals; and advocate tirelessly on behalf of patients, hospitals and communities. Gorman will receive the award at a District of Columbia Hospital Association event later this year.