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Sadiqa Kendi

Sadiqa Kendi, M.D., FAAP, CPST, is 2019 Bloomberg Fellow

Sadiqa Kendi

Sadiqa Kendi, M.D., FAAP, CPST, a pediatric emergency physician at Children’s National and medical director of Safe Kids DC, is among the 2019 cohort of Bloomberg Fellows, an initiative that provides world-class training to public health professionals tackling some of the most intractable challenges facing the U.S.

The Bloomberg American Health Initiative at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health on June 6, 2019, announced fellows who will receive full scholarships to earn an MPH or DrPH as they tackle five U.S. health challenges: addiction and overdose, environmental challenges, obesity and the food system, risks to adolescent health and violence. Now in its third year, the largest group of fellows to date includes representatives from organizations headquartered in 24 states and the District of Columbia.

As part of her environmental challenges fellowship, Dr. Kendi will attempt to lessen the significant morbidity and mortality suffered by children, especially children of color, due to unintentional injuries. Children’s emergency department handles more than 100,000 pediatric visits per year, 1,200 of which result in hospital admission.

“The numbers are staggering: 25% of emergency department visits by kids and more than $28 billion in health care spending are associated with injuries. These preventable injuries claim the highest number of pediatric lives, and children of color and lower income families often disproportionately bear this burden,” Dr. Kendi says.

Bloomberg Fellows Graphic

“Regrettably, I have seen the personal toll close up, and it has been sobering to hug a sobbing parent whose child clings to life after being struck by a car; to clasp the hand of a frightened child who has fallen from playground equipment and suffered a severe fracture; to see the angst written on a caregiver’s face as I lead our team in trying to save a life that easily could have been safeguarded by installing a window guard,” she adds.

Under the auspices of Safe Kids District of Columbia, Dr. Kendi is developing a one-stop Safety Center at Children’s National to provide injury prevention equipment and education to families in five focus areas: child passenger safety, home, pedestrian, sleep and sports.

Safe Kids Worldwide, the umbrella non-profit organization for Safe Kids DC, started at Children’s National and has grown to more than 400 coalitions around the world. Safe Kids DC is the local coalition that is working to address the burden of injury in local District of Columbia communities.

“I’m grateful to be named a Bloomberg Fellow because this opportunity will enable me to better understand the theories, methods of evaluation and tools for addressing the burden of injury in the District of Columbia, including how to assess and address the built environment. This training will help me to better lead my Safe Kids DC team in developing projects, outreach programs and legislative advocacy that have the potential to directly impact the communities we serve,” she adds.

cars in traffic

Sleep science: Decoding drowsy driving

cars in traffic

A study published in The Journal of Pediatrics finds an association between a teen’s preference for evening or morning activities, coupled with nightly sleep duration, influences how awake they feel behind the wheel.

Each year, around Daylight Saving Time, we set our clocks forward and reprogram our bodies to adjust to spring. While most people welcome warmer days and lingering daylight, the time transition – and losing an hour of sleep – may leave some feeling jet lag.

For teens, the time transition is even more pronounced. Due to an adolescent’s developing body and a release of hormones to support growth and development, their biological clock is naturally set for late-evening bedtimes. Getting enough sleep is tough, especially with packed activity schedules and early-morning school start times.

A new study in The Journal of Pediatrics finds the impact of student sleep deprivation extends past feeling alert in class. Almost half of teen drivers surveyed – 205 out of 431 – from Fairfax County Public Schools reported driving drowsy at least once during the 2015 school year, the study period. Out of the 431-person sample, 63.1 percent of respondents reported driving several times a week. One-third of participants drove every day.

Helping teens feel alert behind the wheel is two-fold: Healthy school start times, those starting at 8:30 a.m. or later, help. Getting enough sleep is critical. The researchers also found that a student’s chronotype, or their preference for morning or evening activities, based on the Morningness-Eveningness Scale for Children, factor into drowsy driving:

  • Students with an evening chronotype, or preference for evening activities, coupled with shorter school-night sleep duration, were more likely to experience sleep-impaired driving.
  • Students with a morning chronotype, and who got at least eight hours of sleep, had the lowest prevalence of drowsy driving.
  • Compared with students who slept for at least eight hours on school nights, those who slept for less than seven hours had a 13.9 percent higher prevalence of drowsy driving.
  • The mean age of students surveyed was 16.9 years. The mean range of school-night sleep was seven hours.

Daniel Lewin, Ph.D., associate director of sleep medicine at Children’s National Health System, encourages schools to adopt later school start times, which Fairfax County Public Schools did, and he encourages students and families to assess their sleep patterns – focusing not just on sleep quantity but on sleep quality. His advice for families or students hesitant to change is to start small.

Try a seven-day challenge: Sleep on a regular schedule, sleep for recommended amounts of time, based on age-appropriate guidelines, cut out naps and eliminate late-afternoon caffeine intake.

Most children and families will start to notice the immediate benefits of getting a good night’s sleep, especially throughout the week: less daytime sleepiness, happier moods, improved eating habits and feeling more alert behind the wheel, which impacts driver safety – and not just for teen drivers but for parents, teachers and everyone on the road.

Teenage boy sleeping

Longer concussion recovery in children connected to poor sleep

Teenage boy sleeping

A new research study suggests that adolescents who get a good night’s sleep after a sports-related concussion might be linked to a shorter recovery time.

Research presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics Conference in Orlando, Fla., concluded that young athletes who slept well after a concussion were more likely to recover within two weeks, while those that didn’t receive a good night’s rest increased their likelihood to endure symptoms for 30 days or more.

The design and method was observational, where sleep factors and recovery are examined in association with each other. While the design does not allow a strong causal relationship to be established, it does not report control of other possible mediating variables, its sample size and strength of the findings are strongly suggestive, and provide a rationale for further study of sleep as a critical factor in recovery.

According to Gerard Gioia, Ph.D., chief of the Division of Pediatric Neuropsychology at Children’s National Health System, clinicians should ensure that sleep is properly assessed post-concussion and appropriate sleep hygiene strategies should be provided to the patient and family.

The average age of the 356 participants in the study was 14. Researchers conducting the study had the participants complete a questionnaire called the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Based on the answers reported, the teens were grouped into two categories: 261 good sleepers and 95 poor sleepers.

“The study highlights the importance of sleep, a critical factor in the recovery from a concussion,” says Dr. Gioia, “These findings are highly consistent with our own clinical experience in treating children and adolescents with concussions in that poor sleep are a significant limiting factor in recovery.”

During the follow-up visits three months later, both groups of patients had improved, however the good sleepers continued to have significantly better symptoms and sleep scores.