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Children’s National Hospital at the 2021 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting

Attending the 2021 Pediatric Academic Societies meeting this week? There will be over 20 Children’s National Hospital-affiliated participants at this year’s meeting. We have compiled their sessions into a mini schedule:

Name Program/Department Session and role Date Time
Taeun Chang, M.D.  Neonatal Neurology and Neurocritical Care Program PAS Postgraduate Course: Neonatal Neurology: HIE-focused Project-Based (Chair) Friday, 30 April

 

9:00 AM –
4:00 PM
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Taeun Chang, M.D. Neonatal Neurology and Neurocritical Care Program PAS Postgraduate Course: Neonatal Neurology: HIE-focused Project-Based (Presenter) Friday, 30 April 9:30 AM – 10:00 AM
CT
Yuan-Chiao Lu, Ph.D. Developing Brain Research Laboratory Cardiology Poster: Care of the Fetus and Newborn with CHD (Presenter) Saturday, May 1 4:30 PM – 4:45 PM
CT
Chidiogo Anyigbo, M.D., M.P.H. General and Community Pediatrics Poster: Health Services Research I (Presenter)

 

Saturday, May 1 5:15 PM – 5:30 PM
CT
Panagiotis Kratimenos, M.D. Neonatology Platform (moderator) Saturday, May 1 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
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Sudeepta Basu, MBBS, MS Neonatology Hot Topic Symposia: The Neurological Implications of Abnormal Glycemia in Neonatal Encephalopathy and Prematurity (Chair) Sunday, May 2 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
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Sudeepta Basu, MBBS, MS Neonatology Hot Topic Symposia: The Neurological Implications of Abnormal Glycemia in Neonatal Encephalopathy and Prematurity (Presenter) Sunday, May 2 9:55 AM – 10:15 AM
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Ashraf Harahsheh, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.A.A.P.

 

Cardiology Cardiology: Heart Disease in the Older Child Sunday, May 2 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
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Rana F. Hamdy, M.D., MPH, MSCE Infectious Diseases

 

Expanding Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship: Practical Strategies, Novel Settings, and Sociobehavioral Influences (Presenter) Sunday, May 2 10:15 AM – 10:30 AM
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Rana F. Hamdy, M.D., MPH, MSCE Infectious Diseases

 

Hot Topic Debates: Antibiotic Use in Hospitalized Children (Chair) Sunday, May 2 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
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John Idso, M.D. Critical Care Poster: Resuscitation and Potpourri (presenter) Sunday, May 2 2:20 PM – 2:30 PM
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Michael Shoykhet, M.D., Ph.D. Critical Care Medicine

 

Critical Care Poster: Resuscitation and Potpourri (presenter) Sunday, May 2 2:20 PM – 2:30 PM
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Panagiotis Kratimenos, M.D. Neonatology Neonatal Neurology: Basic & Translational I (moderator) Sunday, May 2

 

4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
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Monika Goyal, M.D. Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services Injury Prevention (moderator) Sunday, May 2 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
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Ioannis Koutroulis, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A. Genetic Medicine Research

 

Emergency Medicine III (moderator) Tuesday, May 4 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
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Sudeepta Basu, MBBS, MS Neonatology Neonatal Neurology: Clinical: HIE and Other Insults (moderator) Tuesday, May 4 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
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Josepheen De Asis-Cruz, M.D., Ph.D. Center for the Developing Brain Neonatal Neurology: Clinical: HIE and Other Insults (presenter) Tuesday, May 4 4:30 PM – 4:45 PM
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Asad Bandealy, M.D., MPH
Priti Bhansali, M.D. Monika Goyal, M.D.
Sabah Iqbal, M.D. Kavita Parikh, M.D. Shilpa Patel, M.D.
Workshop. ThisIsSTILLOurLane: Protect Kids, Not Guns Monday, May 10 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM
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Cara Lichtenstein, M.D. General and Community Pediatrics APA Injury Control/Advocacy Training Combined SIG (SIG Chair) Monday, May 10 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
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Terry Kind, M.D., MPH General and Community Pediatrics

 

APA Women in Medicine / Qualitative Research Combined SIG (SIG Chair) Wednesday, May 12 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM
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Phase I: April-30-May 4 and Phase II: May 10-June 4

PAS 2021 Virtual Schedule

child reaching into drawer for gun

Sociodemographic factors linked to intentional youth firearm injuries

child reaching into drawer for gun

A new study led by researchers at Children’s National Hospital, finds that sociodemographic factors related to intent of injury by firearm may be useful in guiding policy and informing tailored interventions for the prevention of firearm injuries in at-risk youth.

Firearm injuries are a leading and preventable cause of injury and death among youth – responsible for an estimated 5,000 deaths and 22,000 non-fatal injury hospital visits each year in American kids. And while hospital systems are poised to tackle this issue using a public health approach, prevention efforts and policies may be differentially effective. A new study led by researchers at Children’s National Hospital, finds that sociodemographic factors related to intent of injury by firearm may be useful in guiding policy and informing tailored interventions for the prevention of firearm injuries in at-risk youth.

“We sought to explore differences by injury intent in a nationally representative sample of youth presenting to the emergency department with firearm injury,” said Shilpa Patel, M.D., M.P.H., emergency medicine physician at Children’s National Hospital. “We are hopeful that hospitals will support programs that are targeted, patient-centered and relevant to their communities to prevent firearm injury among youth.”

In one of the first comparative studies of factors and outcomes associated with intentionality of youth firearm injury in a large nationally representative sample, researchers identified more than 178,200 weighted hospital visits for firearm injuries with data collected from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) from 2009 through 2016. Dr. Patel and her colleagues identified distinct risk profiles for individuals aged 21 and younger, who arrived at emergency departments with firearm injuries over an 8-year period.

Using NEDS data, researchers found that approximately one third of the injuries were categorized as unintentional, another third as assault and a small proportion as self-harm. The majority of visits were among youth age 18 to 21 years with almost 90% male, and more than 40% publicly insured. Nearly a third were admitted to the hospital and 6% died as a result of their firearm injuries. In addition, the study showed that the likelihood of unintentional injury was higher among children age 12 and younger.

Unintentional firearm injuries were also associated with rural hospital location, southern region, emergency department discharge and extremity injury. Self-harm firearm injuries were associated with older age, higher socioeconomic status, rural hospital location, transfer or death, and brain, back and spinal cord injury.

“These findings provide insight into the overlap between risk factors, outcomes and intentionality of youth firearm injury,” says Dr. Shilpa.  “For hospitals looking to implement programs to reduce youth firearm injury, distinct risk profiles identified in our study align with prior evidence to support the following: screen for firearm access and provide counseling on safe storage targeting families with younger children; screen suicidal patients for access to lethal means, especially those hospitals in rural areas; and screen for firearm access especially among children exposed to violence or at risk for assault presenting to urban hospitals.”

Other researchers who contributed to this study include members of S.A.F.E.R. (Safer through Advocacy, Firearm Education and Research) — a firearm safety advocacy group at Children’s National: Gia M. Badolato, M.P.H., Kavita Parikh, M.D., M.S.H.S., and Monika K. Goyal, M.D., M.S.C.E, all of Children’s National, and Sabah F. Iqbal, M.D., of PM Pediatrics.

 

ambulance

Racial disparities in pediatric deaths related to police intervention

ambulance

Black and Hispanic adolescents are significantly more likely to die from shootings related to police intervention compared to non-Hispanic white adolescents, a recent study shows.

A recent study evaluating the use of force by police against children found that Black and Hispanic adolescents are significantly more likely to die from shootings related to police intervention compared to non-Hispanic white adolescents. The findings, led by Children’s National Hospital researchers and reported online Nov. 24 in Pediatrics, mirror similar racial and ethnic disparities in adults and highlight the need for interventions and policies to mitigate these tragedies.

In recent years, concerns about police use of force — particularly its disproportionate application to people of color — have grown exponentially in the U.S. Between 2003 and 2018, there were 6,512 firearm deaths from police intervention in adults, with non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics having significantly higher per population mortality rates than whites. However, it’s been unclear whether similar racial and ethnic disparities exist for adolescents killed by police intervention.

To explore this question, Monika K. Goyal, M.D., M.S.C.E., associate division chief of Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services and director of Academic Affairs and Research at Children’s National, and her colleagues used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Web-Based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System. This database collects national data from death certificates compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics, including cause of death and race and ethnicity.

The researchers identified all adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 years of age who died from firearm injuries due to police intervention between 2003 and 2018 within this database. They then compared rates of these deaths across different racial and ethnic populations based on U.S. Census Bureau data.

Dr. Goyal and her colleagues found that during the 16-year study period, 140 adolescents had died from police intervention, and of those, 113 involved firearms. The vast majority — about 93% — were male, with a mean age of about 16 years.

Using census data, the researchers found that the rate of firearm deaths due to police intervention was markedly higher among non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic youth when compared to non-Hispanic white youth. Numbers show that, compared to non-Hispanic white children, non-Hispanic Black children had a six-fold higher risk of death due to legal intervention. Similarly, Hispanic children had a risk of death almost three times higher.

“As the country works to reform policing practices and strives to mitigate disparities in our justice system, it is essential we do not forget the disproportionate impact on children of color,” Dr. Goyal says. “Our study confirms these disparities that are stark and unacceptable.”

Dr. Goyal adds that the study only collected data on adolescents who died, rather than non-fatal shootings, and thus, may underestimate the true toll of disparities in use of firearms against youth due to police intervention. Although the study was not designed to investigate the causes of these disparities, she says, recent events provide evidence of structural racism and bias among law enforcement personnel and in its policies.

Although these numbers are small, Dr. Goyal notes that there’s a potential rippling effect, with the death of each child having wide-ranging impact on an entire community.

“Any death of a child is devastating but when it is due to police violence, it leads to distrust in the system and undermines the primary mission to protect,” she says. “The pattern of stark racial and ethnic disparities only adds to this tragedy, further oppressing and alienating communities of color. It’s important to investigate, identify and correct those policies and personnel that perpetuate and exacerbate these disparities.”

Other researchers who contributed to this study include Gia M. Badolato, M.P.H., Meleah D. Boyle, M.P.H., and Robert McCarter, Sc.D., all of Children’s National; April M. Zeoli of Michigan State University; and William Terrill of Arizona State University.

 

coronavirus

Higher COVID-19 rates seen in minority socioeconomically disadvantaged children

coronavirus

Minority and socioeconomically disadvantaged children have significantly higher rates of COVID-19 infection, a new study led by Children’s National Hospital researchers shows.

Minority and socioeconomically disadvantaged children have significantly higher rates of COVID-19 infection, a new study led by Children’s National Hospital researchers shows. These findings, reported online August 5 in Pediatrics, parallel similar health disparities for the novel coronavirus that have been found in adults, the authors state.

COVID-19, an infection caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 that emerged in late 2019, has infected more than 4.5 million Americans, including tens of thousands of children. Early in the pandemic, studies highlighted significant disparities in the rates of infection in the U.S., with minorities and socioeconomically disadvantaged adults bearing much higher burdens of infection. However, says Monika Goyal, M.D., M.S.C.E, a pediatric emergency medicine specialist and associate division chief in the Division of Emergency Medicine at Children’s National whose research focuses on health disparities, it’s been unclear whether these disproportionate rates of infection also extend to youth.

To investigate this question, she and her colleagues looked to data collected between March 21, 2020, and April 28, 2020, from a drive-through/walk-up COVID-19 testing site affiliated with Children’s National — one of the first exclusively pediatric testing sites for the virus in the U.S. To access this free testing site, funded by philanthropic support, patients between the ages of 0 and 22 years needed to meet specific criteria: mild symptoms and either known exposure, high-risk status, family member with high-risk status or required testing for work. Physicians referred patients through an online portal that collected basic demographic information, reported symptoms and the reason for referral.

When Dr. Goyal and her colleagues analyzed the data from the first 1,000 patients tested at this site, they found that infection rates differed dramatically among different racial and ethnic groups. While about 7% of non-Hispanic white children were positive for COVID-19, about 30% of non-Hispanic Black and 46% of Hispanic children were positive.

“You’re going from about one in 10 non-Hispanic white children to one in three non-Hispanic Black children and one in two Hispanic children. It’s striking,” says Dr. Goyal.

Using data from the American Families Survey, which uses five-year census estimates derived from home address to estimate median family income, the researchers separated the group of 1,000 patients into estimated family income quartiles. They found marked disparities in COVID-19 positivity rates by income levels: while those in the highest quartile had infection rates of about 9%, about 38% of those in the lowest quartile were infected.

There were additional disparities in exposure status, Dr. Goyal adds. Of the 10% of patients who reported known exposure to COVID-19, about 11% of these were non-Hispanic white. However, non-Hispanic Black children were triple this number.

Although these numbers show clear disparities in COVID-19 infection rates, the authors are now trying to understand why these disparities occur and how they can be mitigated.

“Some possible reasons may be socioeconomic factors that increase exposure, differences in access to health care and resources, as well as structural racism,” says Dr. Goyal.

She adds that Children’s National is working to address those factors that might increase risk for COVID-19 infection and poor outcomes by helping to identify unmet needs — such as food and/or housing insecurity — and steer patients toward resources when patients receive their test results.

“As clinicians and researchers at Children’s National, we pride ourselves on not only being a top-tier research institution that provides cutting-edge care to children, but by being a hospital that cares about the community we serve,” says Denice Cora-Bramble, M.D., M.B.A., chief medical officer of Ambulatory and Community Health Services at Children’s National and the research study’s senior author. “There’s still so much work to be done to achieve health equity for children.”

Other Children’s National researchers who contributed to this study include Joelle N. Simpson, M.D.; Meleah D. Boyle, M.P.H, Gia M. Badolato, M.P.H; Meghan Delaney, D.O,. M.P.H.; and Robert McCarter Jr., Sc.D.