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little girl with concussion at doctors

Predicting kids’ outcomes after concussion

little girl with concussion at doctors

A concussion symptom measurement tool, developed by investigators at Children’s National Health System, allows other researchers to collect valuable evidence about the natural progression of symptoms and recovery for children. The tool, Post-Concussion Symptom Inventory (PCSI), was a key tool in the recent large-scale multi-center prospective study of recovery trajectory for children, which was published online in JAMA Pediatrics Sept. 4, 2018.

That study included 2,716 children between the ages of 5 and 17, and identified major trends in symptom improvement post concussion, such as:

  • Children younger than 12 experience primary symptom improvement in the first two weeks
  • Pre-adolescents, male adolescents and teens experience primary symptom improvement in the first four weeks and
  • Female adolescents take longer to perceive primary symptom improvements than children, pre-adolescents and male counterparts.

“We’ve known for many years that different people experience concussion recovery very differently. This study is the first to provide significant evidence of what we should expect to see in terms of symptom improvement for children and teens,” says Gerard Gioia, Ph.D., chief of the Division of Neuropsychology at Children’s National and director of its Safe Concussion Outcome Recovery and Education Program, who co-authored the study and whose team developed the PCSI measurement tool. “Ultimately, these findings are an important step in predicting outcomes after a concussion and developing treatment plans that get kids back to school and sports safely, when they are ready.”

Dr. Gioia and his team also recently received a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) grant to develop a new smartphone application, Online Treatment Recovery Assistant for Concussion in Kids (OnTRACK), that applies several concussion tools developed at Children’s National, including the same one applied in the JAMA Pediatrics study, to track individual symptoms over time.

The OnTRACK app will report concussion symptoms on a regular basis (daily or weekly) and map their trajectory, so doctors can see when recovery is proceeding along the expected pathway. Alternatively, clinicians will receive an alert when a child’s recovery misses targets and warrants further investigation and possible referral to a specialist.

Shireen Atabaki

Innovative care using health IT lands Children’s National a 2017 HIMSS Enterprise Davies Award

Shireen Atabaki

A new diagnostic tool led by Shireen Atabaki, M.D., M.P.H., helps prescribers determine if CT scans are necessary for children with head injuries through a checklist protocol.

Opportunities to improve the lives of children are increasingly found at the intersection of health and technology, a sweet spot for enhancing care in today’s connected world. A team of experts at Children’s National Health System launched several initiatives using health information technology to improve care delivery, earning the institution the prestigious 2017 HIMSS Enterprise Davies Award. Recognizing outstanding achievements of organizations that have utilized health IT to significantly improve patient outcomes while also achieving a return on investment, Children’s National received the award based on three case studies in particular:

  • Decreasing use of CAT scans by 44 percent – A new diagnostic tool led by Shireen Atabaki, M.D., M.P.H., emergency medicine specialist, incorporated into the electronic health record helps prescribers determine if CT scans are necessary for children with head injuries through a checklist protocol. The new tool reduced the rate of CT scan utilization by 44 percent – decreasing unnecessary radiation exposure for children and resulting in first-year cost savings of more than $875,000.
  • Innovative unit-based quality boards – These electronic boards provide health care teams and families with real-time quality and safety information. By having patient information readily available in one location, the boards improved medication reconciliation by 13 percent, decreased the time to patient consent by 49 percent, and reduced duration of urinary catheters by 11 percent.
  • Improved clinician documentation – To improve outcomes and reduce costs,

Children’s National transitioned from dictation/transcription-driven notes to electronic/voice recognition notes in ambulatory specialty clinics. This allowed for the immediate availability of notes to all care providers and a significant reduction in transcription costs.

These initiatives demonstrate the life-changing quality and safety efforts under way at Children’s National that put patient safety first. Brian Jacobs, M.D., vice president, chief medical information officer and chief information officer, accepted the award on behalf of Children’s National at the HIMSS Awards gala at the Wynn in Las Vegas in March.

Electronic medical record on tablet

Children’s National submissions make hackathon finals

Electronic medical record on tablet

This April, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute at Children’s National (CTSI-CN) and The George Washington University (GW) will hold their 2nd Annual Medical and Health App Development Workshop. Of the 10 application (app) ideas selected for further development at the hackathon workshop, five were submitted by clinicians and researchers from Children’s National.

The purpose of the half-day hackathon is to develop the requirements and prototype user interface for 10 medical software applications that were selected from ideas submitted late in 2017. While idea submissions were not restricted, the sponsors suggested that they lead to useful medical software applications.

The following five app ideas from Children’s National were selected for the workshop:

  • A patient/parent decision tool that could use a series of questions to determine if the patient should go to the Emergency Department or to their primary care provider; submitted by Sephora Morrison, M.D., and Ankoor Shah, M.D., M.P.H.
  • The Online Treatment Recovery Assistance for Concussion in Kids (OnTRACK) smartphone application could guide children/adolescents and their families in the treatment of their concussion in concert with their health care provider; submitted by Gerard Gioia, Ph.D.
  • A genetic counseling app that would provide a reputable, easily accessible bank of counseling videos for a variety of topics, from genetic testing to rare disorders; submitted by Debra Regier, M.D.
  • An app that would allow the Children’s National Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes Program team to communicate securely and efficiently with diabetes patients; submitted by Cynthia Medford, R.N., and Kannan Kasturi, M.D.
  • An app that would provide specific evidence-based guidance for medical providers considering PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) for HIV prevention; submitted by Kyzwana Caves, M.D.

Kevin Cleary, Ph.D., technical director of the Bioengineering Initiative at Children’s National Health System, and Sean Cleary, Ph.D., M.P.H., associate professor in epidemiology and biostatistics at GW, created the hackathon to provide an interactive learning experience for people interested in developing medical and health software applications.

The workshop, which will be held on April 13, 2018, will start with short talks from experts on human factors engineering and the regulatory environment for medical and health apps. Attendees will then divide into small groups to brainstorm requirements and user interfaces for the 10 app ideas. After each group presents their concepts to all the participants, the judges will pick the winning app/group. The idea originator will receive up to $10,000 of voucher funding for their prototype development.