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DNA strands on teal background

NUP160 genetic mutation linked to steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome

DNA strands on teal background

Mutations in the NUP160 gene, which encodes one protein component of the nuclear pore complex nucleoporin 160 kD, are implicated in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, an international team reports March 25, 2019, in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Mutations in this gene have not been associated with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome previously.

“Our findings indicate that NUP160 should be included in the gene panel used to diagnose steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome to identify additional patients with homozygous or compound-heterozygous NUP160 mutations,” says Zhe Han, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Center for Genetic Medicine Research at Children’s National and the study’s senior author.

The kidneys filter blood and ferry waste out of the body via urine. Nephrotic syndrome is a kidney disease caused by disruption of the glomerular filtration barrier, permitting a significant amount of protein to leak into the urine. While some types of nephrotic syndrome can be treated with steroids, the form of the disease that is triggered by genetic mutations does not respond to steroids.

The patient covered in the JASN article had experienced persistently high levels of protein in the urine (proteinuria) from the time she was 7. By age 10, she was admitted to a Shanghai hospital and underwent her first renal biopsy, which showed some kidney damage. Three years later, she had a second renal biopsy showing more pronounced kidney disease. Treatment with the steroid prednisone; cyclophosphamide, a chemotherapy drug; and tripterygium wilfordii glycoside, a traditional therapy, all failed. By age 15, the girl’s condition had worsened and she had end stage renal disease, the last of five stages of chronic kidney disease.

An older brother and older sister had steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome as well and both died from end stage kidney disease before reaching 17. When she was 16, the girl was able to receive a kidney transplant that saved her life.

Han learned about the family while presenting research findings in China. An attendee of his session said that he suspected an unknown mutation might be responsible for steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in this family, and he invited Han to work in collaboration to solve the genetic mystery.

By conducting whole exome sequencing of surviving family members, the research team found that the mother and father each carry one mutated copy of NUP160 and one good copy. Their children inherited one mutated copy from either parent, the variant E803K from the father and the variant R1173X, which causes truncated proteins, from the mother. The woman (now 29) did not have any mutations in genes known to be associated with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

Some 50 different genes that serve vital roles – including encoding components of the slit diaphragm, actin cytoskeleton proteins and nucleoporins, building blocks of the nuclear pore complex – can trigger steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome when mutated.

With dozens of possible suspects, they narrowed the list to six variant genes by analyzing minor allele frequency, mutation type, clinical characteristics and other factors.

The NUP160 gene is highly conserved from flies to humans. To prove that NUP160 was the true culprit, Dr. Han’s group silenced the Nup160 gene in nephrocytes, the filtration kidney cells in flies. Nephrocytes share molecular, cellular, structural and functional similarities with human podocytes. Without Nup160, nephrocytes had reduced nuclear volume, nuclear pore complex components were dispersed and nuclear lamin localization was irregular. Adult flies with silenced Nup160 lacked nephrocytes entirely and lived dramatically shorter lifespans.

Significantly, the dramatic structural and functional defects caused by silencing of fly Nup160 gene in nephrocytes could be completely rescued by expressing the wild-type human NUP160 gene, but not by expressing the human NUP160 gene carrying the E803K or R1173X mutation identified from the girl’s  family.

“This study identified new genetic mutations that could lead to steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome,” Han notes. “In addition, it demonstrates a highly efficient Drosophila-based disease variant functional study system. We call it the ‘Gene Replacement’ system since it replaces a fly gene with a human gene. By comparing the function of the wild-type human gene versus mutant alleles from patients, we could determine exactly how a specific mutation affects the function of a human gene in the context of relevant tissues or cell types. Because of the low cost and high efficiency of the Drosophila system, we can quickly provide much-needed functional data for novel disease-causing genetic variants using this approach.”

In addition to Han, Children’s co-authors include Co-Lead Author Feng Zhao, Co-Lead Author Jun-yi Zhu, Adam Richman, Yulong Fu and Wen Huang, all of the Center for Genetic Medicine Research; Nan Chen and Xiaoxia Pan, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine; and Cuili Yi, Xiaohua Ding, Si Wang, Ping Wang, Xiaojing Nie, Jun Huang, Yonghui Yang and Zihua Yu, all of Fuzhou Dongfang Hospital.

Financial support for research described in this post was provided by the Nature Science Foundation of Fujian Province of China, under grant 2015J01407; National Nature Science Foundation of China, under grant 81270766; Key Project of Social Development of Fujian Province of China, under grant 2013Y0072; and the National Institutes of Health, under grants DK098410 and HL134940.

DNA

International collaboration discovers new cause for dwarfism

DNA

An international collaboration resulted in the identification of a new cause of dwarfism: mutations in a gene known as DNMT3A.

Beyond diabetes, short stature is the most common reason for children in the U.S. to visit an endocrinologist. For the vast majority of children with short stature, the cause remains unknown – even though many of these conditions stem from an as-yet unidentified genetic cause, says Andrew Dauber, M.D., M.M.Sc., division chief of Endocrinology at Children’s National Health System.

“Parents are concerned about why their child isn’t growing and if there are other complications or health problems they’ll need to watch out for,” he says. “Without a diagnosis, it’s very hard to answer those questions.”

Dauber’s research focuses on using cutting-edge genetic techniques to unravel the minute differences in DNA that limit growth. This research recently led him and his colleagues to identify a new cause of dwarfism: mutations in a gene known as DNMT3A. The discovery, which the team published in the January 2019 Nature Genetics, didn’t happen in isolation – it required a rich collaboration of labs spread across the world in Scotland, Spain, France and New Zealand, in addition to Dauber’s lab in the U.S.

The journey that brought Dauber into this group effort got its start with a young patient in Spain. The boy, then four years old, was at less than 0.1 percentile on the growth curve for height with a very small head circumference and severe developmental delays. This condition, known as microcephalic dwarfism, is incredibly rare and could stem from one of several different genetic causes. But his doctors didn’t know the reason for this child’s specific syndrome.

To better understand this condition, Dauber used a technique known as whole exome sequencing, a method that sequences all the protein-coding regions in an individual’s entire genome. He found a mutation in DNMT3A – a change known as a de novo missense mutation, meaning that the mutation happened in a single letter of the boy’s genetic code in a way that hadn’t been inherited from his parents. But although this mutation was clear, its meaning wasn’t. The only clue that Dauber had as to DNMT3A’s function was that he’d read about overgrowth syndromes in which the function of this gene is lost, leading to large individuals with large heads, the exact opposite of this patient’s condition.

To gather more information, Dauber reached out to Andrew Jackson, Ph.D., a researcher who studies human genes for growth at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Coincidentally, Jackson had already started studying this gene after two patients with a shared mutation in a neighboring letter in the genetic code – who also had short stature and other related problems – were referred to him.

Dauber and his colleagues sent the results from their genetic analysis back across the Atlantic to Jackson’s Edinburgh lab, and the doctors from Spain sent more information to Jackson’s lab, including the patient’s clinical information, blood samples and skin biopsy samples. Then the whole team of collaborators from around the globe set to work to discover the processes influencing short stature in each of these three patients.

Their results showed that these mutations appear to cause a gain of function in DNMT3A. This gene codes for a type of enzyme known as a methyltransferse, which places methyl groups on other genes and on the protein spools called histones that DNA wraps around. Each of these functions changes how cells read the instructions encoded in DNA. While the mutations that cause the overgrowth syndromes appear to allow stem cells to keep dividing long past when they should taper off and differentiate into different cell types – both normal processes in development – the gain of function that appears to be happening in these three patients prompts the opposite situation: Stem cells that should be dividing for a long time during development stop dividing and differentiate earlier, leading to smaller individuals with far fewer cells overall.

The researchers confirmed their findings by inserting one of the gain-of-function human DNMT3A mutations into a mouse, leading to short animals with small heads.

Eventually, says Dauber, these findings could help lead to new treatments for this and other types of dwarfism that act on these genetic pathways and steer them toward normal growth. These and other scientific discoveries hinge on the type of international collaboration that he and his colleagues engaged in here, he adds – particularly for the types of rare genetic syndromes that affect the patients that he and his colleagues study. With only a handful of individuals carrying mutations in certain genes, it’s increasingly necessary to combine the power of many labs to better understand the effects of these differences and how doctors might eventually intervene.

“The expertise for all aspects of any single research project is rarely centered in one institution, one city, or even one country,” Dauber says. “Often, you really need to reach out to people with different areas of expertise around the world to make these types of new discoveries that can have pivotal impacts on human health.”

Doctors working together to find treatments for autoimmune encephalitis

Children’s and Regeneron partner in exome sequencing study

Children’s National, in partnership with the Regeneron Genetics Center (RGC, a subsidiary of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.), has announced the launch of a major three-year research study that will examine the links between undiagnosed disease and an individual’s genetic profile.

The program, directed by Children’s National Geneticist Carlos Ferreira Lopez, M.D., and coordinated by Genetic Counselor Lindsay Kehoe, hopes to include as many as 3,000 patients in its initial year and even greater numbers in the following two years.

During the course of the study, RGC will conduct whole exome sequencing (WES) to examine the entire protein-coding DNA in a patient’s genome. Children’s National geneticists will analyze and screen for certain findings that are known to be potentially causative or diagnostic of disease. Children’s National scientists and providers will confirm preliminary research findings in a lab certified for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA), per federal standards for clinical testing, and refer any confirmatory CLIA-certified cases to appropriate clinicians at Children’s National for further care.

According to Marshall Summar, M.D., Chief of Genetics and Metabolism at Children’s National, the WES study could finally provide patients and their families with the medical answers they have been looking for, allowing for treatment appropriate to their specific genetic condition.

Because pediatric diseases can often elude diagnosis, they can pose a number of detrimental effects to patients and their families, including treatment delays, multiple time- and cost-intensive tests, and stress from lingering uncertainty regarding the illness. With this genomic data, Regeneron will be able to utilize findings to continue its efforts to improve drug development.

Since its inception in 2014, the RGC has strategically partnered with leading medical institutions to utilize human genetics data to speed the development and discovery of new and improved therapies for patients in need.

Neurology and neurosurgery update: whole exome sequencing, Sesame Workshop

May 9, 2016 WES yields clinical diagnoses for 42 percent, ending ‘diagnostic odyssey’.
Whole exome sequencing (WES), a method to look at all the genes in the genome at once, yielded clinical diagnoses for 42 percent of patients whose white matter abnormalities had been unresolved an average of eight years, ending families’ “prolonged diagnostic odyssey.”  White matter disorders, which affect 1 in 7,000 children born each year, are progressive and involve age-related weakness in the region of the nerves that connect various parts of the brain to each other and to the spinal cord. Nine of 28 named authors of the study, published online May 9, 2016 in Annals of Neurology, are affiliated with Children’s National Health System.

April 6, 2016 Georgetown, Children’s National researchers to evaluate Sesame Workshop’s Autism Initiative.
Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization behind Sesame Street, has selected Georgetown University Medical Center and Children’s National Health System researchers to lead an evaluation of  “Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children,” an initiative developed to reduce stigma and build understanding about autism spectrum disorder. Sesame Workshop launched a new phase of its autism initiative in early April. Last year, Sesame Street introduced Julia, an autistic preschool digital Muppet, and accompanying resources, such as an app, videos, storybooks, and daily routine cards as part of the Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children initiative. Now ready for evaluation, Sesame Workshop awarded a grant for real-world testing of the materials to Bruno Anthony, PhD, deputy director of the Georgetown Center for Child and Human Development in collaboration with his wife and research collaborator Laura Anthony, PhD, at the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorder at Children’s National.

Personalized sequencing tailors genetic tests for each patient

Changes or errors in an individual’s DNA are often at the root of many disorders. Personalized Sequencing is a fast, cost-effective way to look at a region of the genome without repeat tests and blood draws.

Changes or errors in an individual’s DNA are often at the root of many disorders. Personalized Sequencing is a fast, cost-effective way to look at a region of the genome without repeat tests and blood draws.

Until recently, doctors and patients had two choices for ordering genetic sequencing panels to identify underlying causes of disease—Individual Gene Testing (single genes and gene panels) or Whole Exome Sequencing.

Individual gene testing is the standard testing modality. Physicians identify a single gene to analyze for change or mutation. If results are negative, they order another individual test, requiring a repeat visit and another blood draw. The process is repeated again and again based on likely candidate genes for a specific disease or symptom. If a physician is very lucky, it takes only a few rounds of tests to find the culprit. More likely, however, the number of individual tests grows large, taking months of patients’ time and increasing healthcare costs significantly. By contrast, Whole Exome Sequencing includes sequencing and analyses of 25,000 genes. It is more expensive when compared with individual gene testing and takes three to six months to complete. When complete, the results often can be more than the doctor and patient bargained for: Potentially revealing a genetic problem that is unrelated to the patient’s current symptoms. A 3-year-old with seizures also may come up positive for BRCA1, the breast cancer gene. Knowing that doesn’t help understand what causes the seizures or how to best treat them. In this model, you receive everything you could ever want. Because there is so much information, however, the results are difficult to interpret or to inform treatment decisions.

We’ve come up with a different way: Personalized Sequencing Panels, a precision medicine initiative at Children’s National Health System. We offer physicians a menu of genetic regions from which to choose when they order a sequencing analysis. While a medical exome is still sequenced, we only analyze a subset of genes that the physician and geneticist think are the most likely targets, which reduces the cost and time for analysis compared to Whole Exome Sequencing. Targeting regions in this approach shortens our turnaround time for results to two or three weeks. If the first identified region shows nothing, we can return to data we’ve already collected for a second look.

We’ve been using the model for 18 months and have tested more than 1,000 patients this way. Eighty percent of physicians prefer to “create their own test” using our menu of options. Rather than bringing a one-size-fits-all test to the patient, we bring the patient their very own personalized test.

About the Author

Sean Hofherr
Laboratory Medicine Specialist