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Gracie Popielarcheck

Raising awareness about Turner Syndrome

Gracie Popielarcheck

Gracie Popielarcheck was diagnosed at age one with Turner Syndrome.

By Roopa Kanakatti Shankar, M.D., M.S., Director of the Turner Syndrome Program at Children’s National Hospital.

The Children’s National  Turner Syndrome Clinic is part of the Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes which is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top 10 programs in the nation. The clinic opened in January 2019 and is the first of its kind in the Washington, D.C., region. A multidisciplinary clinic is held once a month with a team experts in cardiology, endocrinology, psychology, gynecology and genetics to help care for the needs of patients with Turner Syndrome all in one day. The referral network of specialties includes neuropsychology, otolaryngology, audiology, orthopedics, urology and dentistry.

Turner syndrome (TS) is a rare disease affecting girls, with a prevalence of around 25-50 out of every 100,000 females. It is caused by partial or complete loss of the second sex chromosome. This affects multiple organs and can cause heart defects, skeletal abnormalities, hearing loss and learning difficulties. It also affects growth and puberty and can cause infertility. Although the condition was first described in 1938 by Henry Turner, an endocrinologist from Oklahoma, and is well characterized, there is a significant delay in diagnosis and recognition of the condition, especially in milder forms that can still significantly impact the well-being of the individual.

Gracie Popielarcheck with a pet bird

“Having a Turner Syndrome clinic near our city has made life so much easier,” says Gracie’s mom, Leslie Popielarcheck. “We can see all of Gracie’s specialists all in one day and under one roof.”

Families often ask why it took so long to recognize this condition. Many findings can be subtle, the presentation can vary greatly and often short stature may be overlooked in some girls. We now recognize that the classic form (monosomy X) impacts less than half of the girls and the rest have mosaicism (45,X/ 46XX) or other structural abnormalities in the X-chromosome. Recognizing features beyond the classic “short stature, neck webbing, lymphedema and cardiac defects” is indeed important to get timely care for these girls and women across the lifespan. Many have recurrent ear infections and hearing loss. Most have a normal intelligence, and even superior verbal skills but face challenges in visual spatial perception, executive function, working memory and social cognition that impact academic achievement.

13-year-old Gracie Popielarcheck was diagnosed with TS at the age of one after her parents noticed a delay in her speech and development. “We had never heard of Turner Syndrome when Gracie was diagnosed,” says Leslie Popielarcheck, Gracie’s mom. “Gracie didn’t have the classic physical features that girls with Turner Syndrome are known to have.”

With support, most of these girls and women can manage the medical and psychosocial challenges and rise to their full potential. Advances in the field and multidisciplinary care models have helped in the establishment of TS clinics across the country that strive to improve the standard care for these girls.

However, several challenges remain:

  • Improving awareness among primary care physicians in regard to the extended spectrum and variability of presentation at a wide variety of ages
  • Decreasing health disparities and making multidisciplinary clinics and comprehensive care available and accessible even to disadvantaged communities
  • Ensuring adequate medical and social support for transition of young adults and care of adults with Turner syndrome
Gracie P., Kyra Dorfman with Dr. Shankar

Kyra Dorfman, Dr. Shankar and Gracie.

Our TS program, initiated 2 years ago, aims to overcome these challenges and provide care to families impacted by TS in our community. We strive to serve as a Regional Resource for the community as well as physicians in our community and have been recognized by the TSGA (Turner syndrome Global Alliance) as one of only nine clinics nationwide with a Level 4 designation.

“Having a Turner Syndrome clinic near our city has made life so much easier,” Popielarcheck says. “We can see all of Gracie’s specialists all in one day and under one roof.”

As we highlight these resources for the Turner Syndrome Awareness Month this February 2021, and celebrate the strength and tenacity of our beautiful girls, we hope our efforts will improve recognition of the condition and delivery of comprehensive medical care and support to the community we serve.

Clinic Level 4 Regional Resource Center Badge

Turner Syndrome Clinic designated as Level 4 Regional Resource Center

Clinic Level 4 Regional Resource Center Badge

The Children’s National Hospital Turner Syndrome Clinic is proud to be recognized by the Turner Syndrome Global Alliance (TSGA) as a Level 4 Regional Resource Center. Level 4 is the highest Level of Care designation and is based on the KidNECT Care Model which encourages family networking, education, comprehensive coordinated care and transition support as well as leadership in Turner Syndrome (TS) research.

TS is a rare genetic disorder that occurs in 1 to about 2,500 girls and is caused by a partial or complete missing X chromosome. Some of the characteristics of TS are short stature, delayed puberty, kidney, thyroid and heart problems. Although there is no cure for TS, many of the symptoms can be treated.

The Children’s National TS Clinic is part of the Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes which is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top 10 programs in the nation. The TS Clinic opened in January 2019 and is the first one-of-its-kind in the Washington, D.C. region. A multidisciplinary clinic is held once a month with the team comprising of cardiology, endocrinology, psychology, gynecology and genetics to help care for the needs of patients with TS all in one day. The referral network of specialties includes neuropsychology, otolaryngology, audiology, orthopedics, urology and dentistry.

“I am so proud of our team for their hard work and the excellent clinical care they provide for girls with Turner Syndrome,” says Roopa Kanakatti Shankar, M.D., endocrinologist at Children’s National. “This recognition by the Turner Syndrome Global Alliance means that we not only provide comprehensive care but also serve as a regional leader and resource center for the families we serve. We will continue to raise awareness about Turner Syndrome through our research and partnerships.”

Test tube that says IGF-1 test

A new algorithm: Using genomics and EHR to detect severe growth disorders

Test tube that says IGF-1 test

Andrew Dauber, M.D., MMSc., a pediatric endocrinologist and the chief of endocrinology at Children’s National, guided research presented at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, enabling clinicians and researchers to understand the genetic underpinnings of certain pediatric growth disorders, while using electronic health record (EHR) algorithms to screen for presenting symptoms in the exam room. In some cases, this prompts further genetic testing and shortens the diagnostic odyssey for pediatric growth disorders – such as Turner syndrome.

Here is a summary of the research findings, delivered as two oral abstracts and a poster session.

ABSTRACT 1: Presented on Saturday, March 23, at 12:30 p.m. CST

Healthy childhood growth cohort provides insight into PAPPA2 and IGF-1 relationship, revealing a new level of complexity to the biology of growth with implications for the study and treatment of severe growth disorders

Program: Growth, puberty, and insulin action and resistance

Session OR07-5: A Cross-Sectional Study of IGF-I Bioavailability through Childhood: Associations with PAPP-A2 and Anthropometric Data

Background: Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a hormone essential for human growth and is often bound to IGFBP-3, an IGF binding protein. Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein-A2 (PAPP-A2) cleaves intact IGFBP-3, freeing IGF-1 to support normal growth functions. This is the first study, led by Dr. Andrew Dauber with collaborators from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, to track PAPP-A2 and intact IGFBP-3 concentrations throughout childhood. The research team studied 838 healthy children, ages 3-18, in the Cincinnati Genomic Control Cohort, to better understand patterns of growth and development by examining the relationship between PAPPA2 and IGF-1 bioavailability.

Study results: Free IGF-1 increased with age. PAPP-A2, a positive modulator of IGF-1 bioavailability, decreased with age, which surprised the researchers, and is not positively associated with absolute levels of free IGF-1. However, higher levels of PAPP-A2 cleave IGFBP-3 resulting in lower levels of intact IGFBP-3, and consequently, increasing the percentage of free to total IGF-1. This demonstrates that PAPP-A2 is a key regulator of IGF-1 bioavailability on a population-wide scale.

Impact: This research may help endocrinologists create unique, targeted treatment for children with PAPPA2 mutations and could help stratify patients with potential risk factors, such as IGF-1 resistance due to increased binding of IGF-1, associated with severe growth and height disorders. See adjoining study below.

Watch: Video interview with Dr. Dauber

ABSTRACT 2: Presented on Saturday, March 23, at 12:45 p.m. CST

Electronic health records can alert physicians to patients who could benefit from genetic testing to identify severe growth disorders

Program: Growth, puberty, and insulin action and resistance

Session OR07-6: Integrating Targeted Bioinformatic Searches of the Electronic Health Records and Genomic Testing Identifies a Molecular Diagnosis in Three Patients with Undiagnosed Short Stature

Background: Despite referrals to pediatric endocrinologists and extensive hormonal analysis, children with short stature due to a genetic cause, may not receive a diagnosis. Electronic health records may help identify patients – based on associated phenotypes and clinical parameters – who could benefit from genetic testing.

Study results: Researchers from three children’s hospitals – Boston Children’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center – gathered data, starting small, with a known variable, or phenotype, associated with severe growth disorders: insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) resistance. A targeted bioinformatics search of electronic health records led the team to identify 39 eligible patients out of 234 candidates who met the criteria for a possible genetic-linked growth disorder. Participants were included if their height fell below two standard deviations for age and sex and if their IGF-1 levels rose above the 90th percentile. Patients who had a chronic illness, an underlying genetic condition or precocious puberty were excluded. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on DNA extracted from willing participants, including 10 patients and their immediate family members. The research team identified new genetic causes in three out of 10 patients with severe growth disorders, who were previously missed as having a genetic-linked growth disorder.

Note: Two patients had two novel IGF1R gene variants; a third had a novel CHD2 variant (p. Val540Phe). The two patients with IGF1R variants had a maternally inherited single amino acid deletion (p.Thr28del) and a novel missense variant (p. Val1013Phe).

Impact: Similar EHR algorithms can be replicated to identify pediatric patients at risk for or thought to have other genetic disorders, while expanding genetic research and improving patient care.

Watch: Video interview with Dr. Dauber

POSTER: Presented on Monday, March 25, at 1 p.m. CST

Electronic health record alerts could help detect Turner syndrome, shorten diagnostic odyssey for girls born with a missing or partially-deleted X chromosome

Program: Session P54. Pediatric puberty, ovarian function, transgender medicine and obesity

Poster Board #MON-249: Algorithm-Driven Electronic Health Record Notification Enhances the Detection of Turner Syndrome

Background: Turner syndrome (TS) results from a complete or partial loss of the second X chromosome and affects about one in every 2,500 female births. TS is common in females with unexplained short stature, but the diagnosis is often not made until late childhood (8-9 years), leading to delays in treatment and screening for comorbidities, such as heart conditions, chronic ear infections, vision problems and challenges with non-verbal learning. Using electronic health record (EHR) alarms can help clinicians screen for and diagnose TS patients earlier in life.

Study results: Researchers from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center searched EHRs for female patients with idiopathic short stature who met the team’s selection criteria: Their height fell below two standard deviations from the mean for age as well as one standard deviation below the mid-parental height, had a BMI greater than 5 percent and did not have a chronic illness. The search produced 189 patients who met the diagnostic criteria, 72 of whom had not received prior genetic testing. Out of genetic samples available, 37 were compatible for a microarray analysis – which helped the team identify two cases of TS and a third chromosomal abnormality, all of which were missed by routine clinical evaluation.

Impact: DNA samples may not be available for all patients, but clinicians and researchers can identify and integrate tools into EHR’s – creating their own algorithms. An example includes setting up alerts for specific growth parameters, which helps identify and screen patients for TS.

The abstracts Dr. Dauber and his team discuss at ENDO 2019 support ongoing research, including a partnership among four leading children’s hospitals – Children’s National Health System, Boston Children’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Cincinnati Children’s Medical Center – funded by an R01 grant to study how electronic health records can detect and identify novel markers of severe growth disorders.

The researchers hope their findings will also identify and help screen for comorbidities associated with atypical growth patterns, supporting multidisciplinary treatment throughout a child’s life. The study started in August 2018 and includes three sets of unique diagnostic criteria and will analyze WES from dozens of patients over five years.

Read more about Dr. Dauber’s research presented at ENDO 2019 in Endocrine Today and watch his video commentary with Medscape.

little girl being examined by doctor

First Washington-based Turner syndrome clinic opens Jan. 28

little girl being examined by doctor

Endocrinologists at Children’s National work with a team of cardiologists, gynecologists, geneticists, psychologists and other clinicians to provide comprehensive and personalized care for girls with Turner syndrome.

Starting Monday, Jan. 28, 2018 girls with Turner syndrome will be able to receive comprehensive and personalized treatment at Children’s National Health System for the rare chromosomal condition that affects about one in 2,500 female births.

Many girls with Turner syndrome often work with a pediatric endocrinologist to address poor growth and delayed puberty, which may be treated with human growth hormone and estrogen replacement therapy. They may also need specialty care to screen for and treat heart defects, frequent ear infections, hearing loss, vision problems and challenges with non-verbal learning.

Roopa Kanakatti Shankar, M.D., M.S., a pediatric endocrinologist at Children’s National, aims to consolidate this treatment with a comprehensive Turner syndrome clinic.

“We’re creating a place that girls with Turner syndrome can come to receive specialized and personalized treatment, while feeling supported,” says Dr. Shankar.

Patients can now schedule visits and meet with multiple specialists in one clinic location:

The multispecialty referral team includes neuropsychologists, otolaryngologists (ear, nose and throat doctors), orthopedics, urology and dentistry to address unique medical needs. Families can also schedule appointments with audiology and get labs and other studies on the same day.

As girls with Turner syndrome age, they are at increased risk for diabetes, an underactive thyroid and osteoporosis, which is one reason Dr. Shankar wants to educate and increase awareness early on.

“There is something special about girls with Turner syndrome,” says Dr. Shankar. “They are very inspiring and endearing to work with,” she adds, reflecting on her past research and future goals with the clinic. “Their perseverance in the face of challenges is one of the things that inspires me to work in this field.”

The Turner syndrome clinic at Children’s National meets the criteria for a level 2 clinic designation by the Turner Syndrome Global Alliance by providing coordinated medical care, same-day visits with multiple specialists and connecting patients with advocacy groups.

Within the next two years, Dr. Shankar looks forward to meeting level 4 criteria, the designation for a regional resource center, by adding multi-institutional research partners, mentoring programs and organizing a patient-family advisory council.

“As we start out, we aim to provide excellent clinical care and create a database while forming these partnerships, and over time, we hope this information will influence future research studies and foster a greater depth of tailored care,” says Dr. Shankar. “Our ultimate goal is to treat, support and empower girls with Turner syndrome to achieve their full potential.”

To learn more about the Turner syndrome clinic, available on the fourth Monday of every month, visit ChildrensNational.org/endocrinology.