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Children’s National Heart Institute experts partner with FDA and nation’s leading cardiology organizations to advance pediatric drug development

New joint health policy statement offers roadmap for immediate changes in clinical trial design to save children’s lives

Families with children suffering from rare and difficult-to-treat cardiovascular diseases may soon have better access to drugs to treat their often life-threatening conditions. For the first time, experts from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics are working together to describe the challenges and opportunities to improve pediatric drug research as shared in a joint statement published online June 29 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

“Children should have access to the latest advances in treatment and the best care. By challenging the status quo and designing new, safe and effective alternative study designs, we can give them the best opportunity to grow up stronger,” notes David Wessel, M.D., executive vice president and chief medical officer, Hospital and Specialty Services at Children’s National Health System. Dr. Wessel is internationally recognized for his pioneering work in caring for children with heart disease. As the senior author of the new joint statement and principal investigator of the STARTS-1 trial, which is the catalyst for this collaboration, he says he is “optimistic about this forward progress.”

According to the statement, less than 50 percent of drugs approved for use in the United States have sufficient data to support labeling for dosing, safety and efficacy in children. Additionally, a 2008 report by Pasquali et al, which reviewed more than 30,000 records of hospitalized children with cardiovascular disease, found that 78 percent received at least one off-label medication and 31 percent received more than three.

There are numerous challenges in the development and approval of medications for children – especially those with rare diseases – but the paper’s lead author, Craig Sable, M.D., associate division chief of cardiology at Children’s National, says we can and need to do better.

“While randomized clinical drug trials remain the gold standard in advancing care for adults with cardiovascular disease, relying solely on these types of trials for children unnecessarily limits the drugs approved for use in children,” says Dr. Sable. “Through this unique collaboration that unifies the voice of leaders in pediatric cardiology and the FDA, our goal is to provide a framework to better define which drugs are needed and how we can create novel study designs to overcome the current trial barriers.”

To read more about the barriers and ideas presented, please find the full statement here.