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Boy with scoliosis during rehabilitation

Children’s National first-use of anterior vertebral body tethering system for idiopathic scoliosis

Boy with scoliosis during rehabilitation

On Monday, Feb. 1, 2021, Children’s National Hospital performed the first anterior vertebral body tethering procedure for a child in the Washington, D.C., area. The device is a recently approved option for treating children with idiopathic scoliosis, the most common type of scoliosis. It allows for gradual correction of a spinal deformity through the natural growth of the spine, leading to improvements in spinal alignment while maintaining spinal flexibility.

In August 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first spinal tether system for pediatric patients called The Tether – Vertebral Body Tethering System. This device is attached to the spine during a minimally invasive thorascopic procedure performed by a multidisciplinary medical team, which includes orthopaedic surgery, thoracic surgery and anesthesia.

“This promising technology may help maintain the flexibility of the spine as it grows straighter over time,” says Matthew Oetgen, M.D., chief of Orthopaedics at Children’s National. “Novel devices like The Tether offer additional treatment options for idiopathic scoliosis, which have the potential to improve pediatric surgical outcomes and quality of life for children and adolescents with significant spinal deformities.”

The procedure at Children’s National brought together some the region’s best pediatric orthopaedic and thoracic surgeons, including Dr. Oetgen, Shannon Kelly, M.D., associate chief of Orthopaedic Surgery, and Timothy Kane, M.D., chief of General and Thoracic Surgery.

“Children’s National can offer these types of procedures because the hospital is home to many talented pediatric surgeons across specialties, many of whom are experts in minimally invasive techniques for children,” says Dr. Kane. “We collaborate together, often, because we know that’s the best way to continually improve the care we provide to children and their families.”

Idiopathic scoliosis is the most common type of scoliosis and can occur in children between age 10 and 18 or until they are fully grown. Spinal fusion surgery is the most common treatment for children with the most severe spine curvatures and continues to be the “gold standard” for surgical treatment of this condition. It takes about 3 months for a child or adolescent to fully recover from the procedure. While spinal fusion produces excellent and reproducible outcomes, in certain patients with less severe deformities and significant skeletal growth remaining, vertebral body tethering may offer some benefits over spinal fusion. In clinical trials, the spinal tether was shown to shorten recovery time and increase range of motion. Early diagnosis is vital to dictate which treatment will be most beneficial.

insta-3D™ imaging from company nView medical

New innovative 3D imaging technology used in pediatric spine surgery

insta-3D™ imaging from company nView medical

Children’s National Hospital performed the first surgical use of breakthrough medical imaging technology designed specifically for kids. The innovation, insta-3D™ imaging from company nView medical, is designed to make 3D images available in the operating room quickly and safely.

Children’s National Hospital performed the first surgical use of breakthrough medical imaging technology designed specifically for kids. The innovation, insta-3D™ imaging from company nView medical, is designed to make 3D images available in the operating room quickly and safely. The 3D images provide surgeons with better visualization, allowing them to continue improving patient care and outcomes.

Matthew Oetgen, M.D., division chief of Orthopaedic Surgery at Children’s National, is overseeing the first use of this 3D imaging technology in orthopaedic procedures.

“Having a technology like this available in the operating room will potentially help make our surgeries even more precise with 3D imaging available quickly,” says Dr. Oetgen. “We anticipate this improved precision will lead to better outcomes and added value to what we do for our patients.”

Cristian Atria, nView medical’s CEO, commented for the first case.

“Seeing our imaging technology provide critical information during a kid’s surgery reminds us what the purpose of nView medical is all about,” says Cristian. “I would like to thank the surgeons, our backers, the team, and our clinical partners for making this first surgery a success. I couldn’t be more enthusiastic for what’s ahead!”

The potential of nView medical’s insta-3D™ imaging is especially exciting for Children’s National as nView medical is a 2019 Winner of the National Capital Consortium for Pediatric Device Innovation (NCC-PDI) competition “Make Your Medical Device Pitch for Kids!” NCC-PDI is led by the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation at Children’s National and the A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland with support from partners MedTech Innovator, BioHealth Innovation, and design firm Archimedic.

NCC-PDI is one of five members in the FDA’s Pediatric Device Consortia Grant Program created to support the development and commercialization of medical devices for children in areas of critical need where innovation can significantly improve children’s health care.

“Children deserve to benefit from our most advanced medical technologies and we know that improvements in pediatric care can make a positive difference over the lifetime of a child,” says Kolaleh Eskandanian, Ph.D., M.B.A, P.M.P, vice president and chief innovation officer at Children’s National and principal investigator of NCC-PDI. “Pediatric hospitals must lead the way in supporting innovation for children’s care. That’s why, through NCC-PDI and our innovation institute, Children’s National helps to provide promising new pediatric devices with resources and expertise that support their journey to the market.”