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Alexandra M. Sim

Alexandra M. Sims, M.D., FAAP, counsels grads to know their who, how and why

Alexandra M. Sim

Alexandra M. Sims, M.D., FAAP, general academic pediatrics fellow at Children’s National, tells newly minted George Mason social sciences graduates the concrete and abstract skills they learned during their collegiate experience are exceedingly valuable.

As a 10-year-old growing up in the suburbs of Richmond, Virginia, lip syncing with friends as they pretended to be Destiny’s Child, Alexandra M. Sims, M.D., FAAP, predicted her future: She would become a doctor.

“Ten is a really funny age,” Dr. Sims told members of the 2019 graduating class from George Mason University College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the school and department from which she received her undergraduate degree in Anthropology. “I was old enough to feel compelled to contribute to the world meaningfully, but too young to know the weight of this undertaking. I was old enough to be intrigued by the science of the human body, but too young to be intimidated by the fact that there were no doctors in my family.”

Dr. Sims’ youngest sister, Bria, was born four weeks premature and died a few weeks after birth. The sting of that tragedy instilled in her a commitment to serve others and informed a lifelong passion to help society’s most marginalized.

Ten years after graduating George Mason herself, she invited this year’s newly minted graduates to distill their college experience into three terms: who, how and why:

  • Who means the family members and mentors who helped them enter college and persevere toward graduation.
  • How is their plan to change the world. The general academics pediatrics fellow at Children’s National asks kids about their unique superpower during visits to the primary care clinic at Children’s Health Center Anacostia. “I get a range of responses, and some of them are quite funny,” she told 800 social sciences graduates gathered for their degree celebration. “Some really surprise me in other ways. ‘I want to be kind.’ ‘I want to help people.’ ‘I want to take care of my parents.’ ”
  • Why is the reason they continue to do what they’re doing. For Dr. Sims, that’s service and mitigating health disparities, a mission that has led her to travel around the globe conducting HIV/AIDS outreach and building coalitions near and far. Her current work is domestic, as she seeks advocates for at-risk communities through health services research.

“So, come back to these when you’re feeling unsure or uneasy: your WHO, your HOW and your WHY. Know that your time here at Mason is time well spent, and that the skills that you’ve gained, both the concrete and the abstract, are exceedingly valuable,” she advised the group.