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Janelle Vaughns

Few prescribing options exist for obese kids

Janelle Vaughns

“We are making progress in expanding the number of medicines with pediatric labeling, but we need to do more concerning providing dosing guidelines for children with obesity,” says Janelle D. Vaughns, M.D., director of bariatric anesthesia at Children’s National and the lead study author.

Despite years of study and numerous public health interventions, overweight and obesity continue to grow in the U.S. Currently, more than two-thirds of adults have these issues, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Children and adolescents also are being affected at an increasing rate: About one in five is obese. Obesity and overweight have been linked with a bevy of health problems, including Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, coronary heart disease and stroke.

Additionally, because obesity increases the percentage of fat tissue in relation to lean tissue and enlarges kidney size, it can affect how readily the body takes up, metabolizes and excretes medicines.

This latter issue can be particularly problematic in children, a population for whom relatively few drug studies exist. Now, a study team that includes Children’s National Health System researchers suggests that, despite the U.S. Congress providing incentives to drug manufacturers to encourage the study of medications in children, few approved drugs include safe dosing information for obese kids.

The study, performed in conjunction with the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, surveyed pediatric medical and clinical pharmacology reviews under the FDA Amendments Act of 2007 and the FDA Safety and Innovation Act of 2012. The researchers used search terms related to weight and size to determine the current incorporation of obesity as a covariate in pediatric drug development.

Of the 89 product labels identified, none provided dosing information related to obesity. The effect of body mass index on drug pharmacokinetics was mentioned in only four labels, according to the study “Obesity and Pediatric Drug Development,” published online Jan. 19, 2018, in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

“We are making progress in expanding the number of medicines with pediatric labeling, but we need to do more concerning providing dosing guidelines for children with obesity,” says Janelle D. Vaughns, M.D., director of bariatric anesthesia at Children’s National and the lead study author. “Moving forward, regulators, clinicians and the pharmaceutical industry should consider enrolling more obese patients in pediatric clinical trials to facilitate the safe and effective use of the next generation of medicines by obese children and adolescents.”

Study co-authors include Children’s Gastroenterologist Laurie Conklin, M.D., and Children’s Division Chief of Clinical Pharmacology Johannes N. van den Anker, M.D., Ph.D.; Ying Long, Pharm.D., University of Southern California; Panli Zheng, Pharm.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Fahim Faruque, Pharm.D., University of Maryland; and Dionna Green, M.D., and Gilbert Burckart, Pharm.D., both of the FDA.

Research reported in this news release was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health under award number 5T32HD087969.

Children’s National Heart Institute experts partner with FDA and nation’s leading cardiology organizations to advance pediatric drug development

New joint health policy statement offers roadmap for immediate changes in clinical trial design to save children’s lives

Families with children suffering from rare and difficult-to-treat cardiovascular diseases may soon have better access to drugs to treat their often life-threatening conditions. For the first time, experts from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics are working together to describe the challenges and opportunities to improve pediatric drug research as shared in a joint statement published online June 29 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

“Children should have access to the latest advances in treatment and the best care. By challenging the status quo and designing new, safe and effective alternative study designs, we can give them the best opportunity to grow up stronger,” notes David Wessel, M.D., executive vice president and chief medical officer, Hospital and Specialty Services at Children’s National Health System. Dr. Wessel is internationally recognized for his pioneering work in caring for children with heart disease. As the senior author of the new joint statement and principal investigator of the STARTS-1 trial, which is the catalyst for this collaboration, he says he is “optimistic about this forward progress.”

According to the statement, less than 50 percent of drugs approved for use in the United States have sufficient data to support labeling for dosing, safety and efficacy in children. Additionally, a 2008 report by Pasquali et al, which reviewed more than 30,000 records of hospitalized children with cardiovascular disease, found that 78 percent received at least one off-label medication and 31 percent received more than three.

There are numerous challenges in the development and approval of medications for children – especially those with rare diseases – but the paper’s lead author, Craig Sable, M.D., associate division chief of cardiology at Children’s National, says we can and need to do better.

“While randomized clinical drug trials remain the gold standard in advancing care for adults with cardiovascular disease, relying solely on these types of trials for children unnecessarily limits the drugs approved for use in children,” says Dr. Sable. “Through this unique collaboration that unifies the voice of leaders in pediatric cardiology and the FDA, our goal is to provide a framework to better define which drugs are needed and how we can create novel study designs to overcome the current trial barriers.”

To read more about the barriers and ideas presented, please find the full statement here.