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Kinsley and Dr. Timothy Kane

Case study: Diagnosing a choledochal cyst in utero

Kinsley and Dr. Timothy Kane

The Feigel family worked with Timothy Kane, M.D., the division chief of general and thoracic surgery at Children’s National, to ensure an accurate diagnosis, coordinate a corrective procedure and support a strong recovery for Kinsley, who just celebrated a 5-month milestone.

On Sept. 30, 2018, Elizabeth Feigel gave birth to a healthy baby girl, Kinsley Feigel. Thirty-two days later, Elizabeth and her husband, Steven Feigel, delighted in another hospital moment: Kinsley, who developed a choledochal cyst in utero, was recovering from a surgical procedure to remove an abnormal bile duct cyst, which also required the removal of her gallbladder.

While the series of events, interspersed with multiple hospital visits, would likely create uneasiness in new parents, the Feigel family worked with Vahe Badalyan, M.D., a gastroenterologist at Children’s National Health System, and with Timothy Kane, M.D., the division chief of general and thoracic surgery at Children’s National, to ensure an accurate diagnosis, coordinate a corrective procedure and support a strong recovery for Kinsley, who just celebrated a 5-month milestone.

One of the keys to Kinsley’s success was close communication between her parents and providers.

Dr. Badalyan and Dr. Kane listened to Elizabeth and Steven’s concerns, explained complex medical terms in lay language, and provided background about Kinsley’s presenting symptoms, risk factors and procedures. Instead of second-guessing the diagnosis, Elizabeth and Steven put their trust into and remained in contact with the medical team, sharing updates about Kinsley at home. This parent-physician partnership helped ensure an accurate diagnosis and tailored treatment for Kinsley.

Here is her story.

An early diagnosis

During a 12-week prenatal ultrasound, Elizabeth discovered that Kinsley had an intra-abdominal cyst. Before Elizabeth came to Children’s National for an MRI, she met with several fetal medicine specialists and had a variety of tests, including an amniocentesis to rule out chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome.

The team at Children’s National didn’t want to prematurely confirm Kinsley’s choledochal cyst in utero, but additional ultrasounds and an MRI helped narrow the diagnosis to a few conditions.

After Kinsley was born, and despite looking like a healthy, full-term baby, she was transported to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Children’s National. Dr. Badalyan and Dr. Kane analyzed Kinsley’s postnatal sonogram and found the cyst was bigger than they previously thought. Over a five-day period, the medical team kept Kinsley under their close watch, running additional tests, including an additional sonogram. They then followed up with Kinsley on an outpatient basis to better understand and diagnose her cyst.

Outpatient care

Over the next few weeks, Kinsley, Elizabeth and Steven returned to Children’s National to coordinate multiple exams, ranging from an MRI to a HIDA scan. During this period, Elizabeth and Steven remained in contact with Dr. Badalyan. They heard about Kinsley’s lab results and sent updates about her symptoms, including her stool, which helped the medical team monitor her status.

Meanwhile, Dr. Badalyan and Dr. Kane worked closely with the lab to measure Kinsley’s bilirubin levels. Her presenting symptoms and risk factors, she had jaundice and is a female baby of Asian descent, are associated with both choledochal cysts and biliary atresia.

Over time and with the help of Elizabeth, Steven and the pediatric radiologists, Dr. Badalyan and Dr. Kane confirmed Kinsley had a type 1 choledochal cyst, the most common. Originally, the plan was to operate at three to six months, but Dr. Kane needed to expedite the procedure and operate on Kinsley at one month due to a rise in her bilirubin, a sign of progressive liver disease.

Higher bilirubin levels are common in newborns and remain elevated at about 5 mg/dL after the first few days of birth, but Kinsley’s levels peaked and remained elevated. Instead of her bile flowing into her intestine, her choledochal cyst reduced the flow of bile, which accumulated and started to pour back into her liver. The timing of the surgery was as important as the procedure.

The surgery

On Oct. 31, Halloween, Kinsley had laparoscopic surgery to remove the choledochal cyst. Approximately five to seven patients per year undergo choledochal cyst removal at Children’s National. Smaller infants typically undergo removal of a choledochal cyst using a large incision (or open procedure). Kinsley was the smallest baby at Children’s National to have this type of surgery performed by minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery, which required a few 3-mm incisions – the size of coriander seeds.

Some hospitals use the da Vinci robot, which starts at 8-mm incisions, the size of a small pearl, to conduct this procedure on infants, but this method cannot effectively be done in very small infants. Instead, Dr. Kane prefers to stitch sutures by hand. This technique keeps the incisions small and is technically demanding, but Dr. Kane doesn’t mind (he views this as an advanced technical skill). The goal for this surgery was to cut out the abnormal piece of Kinsley’s common bile duct, comprised of the cyst, remove  this and then sew the bile duct to the small intestine (duodenum), creating a digestive pathway. The new digestive tube allows for bile to flow from her liver through the common hepatic duct, in place of the pathway where the cyst formed, and into her intestine.

Like other surgeries, Dr. Kane needed to adapt the procedure, especially with Kinsley’s size: Taking too much from the bile duct would create a tight space, and could create obstruction, blocking bile, while leaving too much room could create leakage and spilling of the bile, requiring a follow-up surgical procedure within a week or two of the original operation.

Dr. Kane had a few options in mind before he operated. He didn’t know which would be most suitable until the operation, but he remained open and prepared for all three. Adopting this mindset, instead of having one procedure in mind, has helped Dr. Kane with precise and tailored surgeries, which often result in the best procedure and a stronger recovery period for young patients.

After 4.5 hours, the surgery, a two-part procedure – removing the cyst and recreating a functional bile duct – was complete.

Kinsley moved into the recovery unit, where she rested and recovered under close medical supervision for five days. During the first few days, she didn’t have liquids or milk, but she did have two bedside nurses monitoring her status in addition to surgeons making regular rounds. Elizabeth and Steven were relieved: The diagnosis and surgery were over.

Managing risk factors

Before Kinsley left the hospital, Elizabeth and Steven scheduled a follow-up visit to ensure Kinsley was recovering well and avoided risk of infection, such as cholangitis, which can occur suddenly and become chronic.

Following Kinsley’s post-surgical bloodwork in early November, Dr. Badalyan noticed Kinsley’s white blood count was high, signaling infection, and he immediately brought the family back to the hospital. To help her body fight the infection, Kinsley received antibiotics and intravenous fluids. She stayed in the hospital for five days. Fortunately, cholangitis is easy to treat with antibiotics; the key is to detect it early.

Kinsley returned home in time for Thanksgiving. She came back to the hospital for biweekly visits. At this point, she was filling out, reaching a 2-month milestone and nearing a full recovery. She returned for follow-up visits in December and January – and has been healthy ever since. She will continue to make routine visits during her first year to ensure her white blood count remains in a healthy range.

Investing in youth resilience

Dr. Badalyan and Dr. Kane envision a healthy future for Kinsley. They don’t expect she’ll need additional operations. Her parents are also looking on the bright side: Since gallbladders aren’t essential for survival or long-term health outcomes, and since many people can easily live without them, Kinsley may be at an advantage. Elizabeth thinks Kinsley may be more cautious about lifestyle choices to support living without a gallbladder, which also support longevity.

Another perspective noted by Dr. Badalyan and Dr. Kane is Kinsley’s resilience factor. Having the surgery earlier brought unique challenges, but her age makes it easier for Kinsley to bounce back as her body rapidly develops. Her tissues were healthy, compared to adult patients undergoing surgery with chronic liver problems or heart disease, which puts her at an advantage for a faster healing process. Dr. Badalyan also mentions that while it’s good for her Kinsley and her family to continue to monitor risks for infections, she won’t have gallstones.

Elizabeth also started to notice something that Kinsley’s doctors likely wouldn’t pick up on: Her personality seems to be a result of her hospital experience and stay. Kinsley’s an easy baby. She eats well and sleeps well, which Elizabeth credits to being around clinicians and to learning the art of self-soothing, a skill she likely acquired while recovering from surgery.

This month, Kinsley has another adventure. She’ll travel with her parents to visit extended family in Seattle, Napa Valley, Calif. and West Virginia. She has several relatives and family friends, all of whom are looking forward to meeting her.

NICU Nurse Manager receives the 2017 Richard Hader Visionary Leader Award

Maureen Maurano accepts the 2017 Richard Hader Visionary Leader Award at the Nursing Management Congress 2017.

Maureen Maurano accepts the 2017 Richard Hader Visionary Leader Award at the Nursing Management Congress 2017.

Maureen Maurano, NICU Nurse Manager at Children’s National Health System, was honored as the winner of the 2017 Richard Hader Visionary Leader Award at the Nursing Management Congress 2017 held October 2-6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The annual award recognizes excellence in nursing leadership and awards a nurse leader who views nursing as both an art and a science by promoting caring and competence as the link between science and humanity.

The winner of the award is nominated by a colleague and is entered into the competition after the Nursing Management journal’s editorial board has received a 2,000 word manuscript detailing the nominee’s accomplishment in the planning, development, implementation and evaluation of a sustainable change in the work environment or clinical practice that has resulted in a positive outcome. The editorial board selects the winner based on the manuscript’s readability, originality, and evidence of credibility. The winning manuscript will be featured in the January 2018 issue of Nursing Management.

“I am truly honored to have accepted this Visionary Leadership Award, however, this could not have been achieved without our amazing leadership and nursing team,” says  Maurano. “It is truly a team effort that empowers our success on a daily basis in providing the most innovative and world-class care for our patients at Children’s.”

Vice President of Nursing and Chief Nursing Officer, Linda Talley says, “Maureen is an outstanding nurse leader who exemplifies our core values – commitment, compassion and connection – through her engagement of others, creating a positive work environment and driving change that has a positive influence on the professional practice of nursing.  We are very proud of her and the recognition she has so deservedly earned.”

With a crowd of over 2,000 medical professionals, Maurano accepted her award as a leader of excellence representing the U.S. News and World Report #1 NICU for babies. Congratulations again Maureen for receiving this great honor!

Children’s sponsors medical and health app development workshop

Hackathon Winners

Team 10, also known as “The BabyDaddies,” won the hackathon for their presentation on BabyData: A medical app for neonatal care providers. Team members, from left to right, are Jessica Castillo, Mohammed Abu-Rub, Saud Aljuhani and Jessica Herstek.

The Clinical and Translational Science Institute at Children’s National (CTSI-CN) recently sponsored a Medical and Health App Development Workshop in collaboration with The George Washington University (GW). Kevin Cleary, Ph.D., technical director of the Bioengineering Initiative at Children’s National Health System, and Sean Cleary, Ph.D., M.P.H., associate professor in epidemiology and biostatistics at GW, created this event to provide an interactive learning experience for those interested in developing medical and health software applications.

Not your average workshop, attendees had the opportunity to network, gain expert knowledge and participate in a group contest for a chance to win up to $10,000 in funding toward prototype development. To kick off events, attendees heard from presenters on the following topics:

  • Human factors: Shelly Heller, Ph.D., professor of the computer science department at GW
  • User interface prototyping: Tim Wood, Ph.D., assistant professor of the computer science department at GW
  • Regulatory environment: Linda Ricci, associate director for digital health within the Office of Device Evaluation, The Food and Drug Administration

Ahead of the workshop, the Children’s National and GW communities submitted ideas for consideration. Judges selected ten ideas for development at the workshop and organized teams of participants around each idea. Teams were judged on their overall presentation, durability of the application, and potential impact in the medical and health world. After careful deliberation, Team 10, also known as “The BabyDaddies,” won for their presentation on BabyData: A medical app for neonatal care providers. The newborn care mobile application aims to calculate the most commonly used values to promote efficient and evidence-based care for newborns in their first hours, days and weeks of life.

“Although some calculations are simple, a lot of time could be saved when you multiply those calculations by seeing 20 to 40 newborns a day,” says Jessica Herstek, M.D., Children’s National project lead and idea originator. “I wanted to create something easy that could help care providers on a day-to-day basis.”

Dr. Herstek is now working with CTSI-CN to bring the application to life. BabyData will feature calculators for measurements, weight assessments, risk evaluations, gestational and chronological age, nutrition, hydration, Group B Streptococcal prophylaxis and glucose infusion rate, all things currently being assessed manually. Medical providers who care for newborns in inpatient, emergency and outpatient settings will have all the resources they need consolidated into one field-specific calculator application.