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feeding tubes

NIH grant funds development of pediatric feeding tube placement device

feeding tubes

A new grant will help to finalize development of the Pediatric PUMA-G System, the world’s first and only ultrasound-based procedure for placing feeding tubes into the stomach.

Researchers at Children’s National Hospital have received grant funding from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, within the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to finalize development of the Pediatric PUMA-G System, the world’s first and only ultrasound-based procedure for placing feeding tubes into the stomach. The funding will also support the first clinical trial of this technology in pediatric patients.

“Children’s National was chosen because we have a strong record of innovating pediatric devices and surgical procedures through the Sheikh Zayed Institute and we have a busy clinical interventional radiology service,” says Karun Sharma, M.D., Ph.D., director of Interventional Radiology and associate director of clinical translation at the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation (SZI) at Children’s National. “We are proud to be a part of this collaboration that will potentially help improve care of pediatric patients who cannot tolerate feeding by mouth.”

The feeding tubes are vital for children who cannot eat or swallow and require liquid nutrition (known as enteral feeding). Common feeding tube placement procedures for children may expose them to risks from invasive surgical tools or from ionizing radiation, which may lead to cancer in young patients at elevated rates. The PUMA-G System is less invasive and uses ultrasound to help physicians image the body during the procedure.

The grant, totaling $1.6M, will clinically evaluate the Pediatric PUMA-G System in collaboration with CoapTech, a biotechnology medical device company and two other premier pediatric medical centers — New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

NephCure Kidney International logo

Marva Moxey-Mims, M.D., named NephCure Kidney International scientific adviser

NephCure Kidney International logo

Marva Moxey-Mims, M.D., chief of the Division of Nephrology at Children’s National Health System, has been named to the Scientific Advisory Board for NephCure Kidney International, a non-profit that aims to accelerate research for rare forms of nephrotic syndrome.

Dr. Moxey-Mims and two additional scientific advisers were selected for their commitment to improving care for patients with glomerular disease, diseases that impair kidney function by attacking blood cleaning units within the kidney.

During her tenure at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Moxey-Mims launched the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children Cohort Study, a prospective study to investigate chronic kidney disease risk factors and outcomes, and helped launch the Cure Glomerulonephropathy Network, a multi-site study with the overarching aim to advance the diagnosis and care of patients with four different glomerular diseases.

“I am truly honored to join this distinguished group of scientific advisers and look forward to leveraging our combined strengths and research knowledge in order to deliver cures for kidney diseases faster,” says Dr. Moxey-Mims.

Lisa M. Guay-Woodford, M.D

Internationally renowned pediatric nephrologist named to NIH advisory council

Lisa M. Guay-Woodford, M.D

Pediatric nephrologist Lisa M. Guay-Woodford, M.D., has been named to a three-year term as adviser serving on the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases subcouncil.

Dr. Guay-Woodford, Director of the Center for Translational Science at Children’s National, is an internationally recognized expert in the mechanisms that modulate the clinical severity of certain inherited renal disorders, such as autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. She holds the Richard L. and Agnes F. Hudson Professorship in Health Services Research at Children’s National.

NIDDK, like other grant-awarding institutes within the National Institutes of Health (NIH), looks to its advisory councils for feedback on procedures that govern staff and manage its grant portfolios. The institute, the fifth largest at the NIH, supports clinical research about internal medicine and related subspecialties for many of the most common chronic health conditions.

“It is a tremendous honor to be asked to serve on this important council. I look forward to providing advice and perspective on the exciting portfolio of NIDDK-funded projects,” Dr. Guay-Woodford says.