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Jeffrey Dome

Treating Wilms Tumor with vincristine and irinotecan

Jeffrey Dome

“The study was impactful because it established the activity of vincristine/irinotecan against Wilms tumor. Based on these findings, this chemotherapy combination will be applied more broadly in the treatment of Wilms tumor,” says study leader Jeffrey S. Dome, M.D, Ph.D.

Wilms tumor, the most common kidney cancer of childhood, may be classified into different subtypes based on its appearance under the microscope. The “favorable histology” subtype is associated with an excellent survival rate of approximately 90%, whereas the “diffuse anaplastic” subtype is associated with survival rates of only 55% for patients with stage II-IV disease.

The Children’s Oncology Group AREN0321 study, led by Jeffrey S. Dome, M.D, Ph.D., vice president of the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s National Hospital, tested the anti-tumor activity of the chemotherapy combination vincristine and irinotecan in patients with metastatic diffuse anaplastic Wilms tumor.

The study also evaluated whether a new treatment regimen containing carboplatin in addition to the currently used agents (vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and etoposide) would improve patient outcomes. The results, published in the March 5th issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, showed that the vincristine/irinotecan combination is highly active. Out of the group, 78% of patients who received this combination had an objective tumor response.

The study also demonstrated that additional chemotherapy drugs can reduce the rate of relapse, but it is likely that we have reached the limit of what children can tolerate. “Future gains will likely be made by using agents with novel mechanisms of action, such as immunotherapy and new drugs that target the molecular abnormalities of Wilms tumor cells,” says Dr. Dome.

Moreover, the additional chemotherapy agents improved cancer-free survival rates to levels unprecedented for diffuse anaplastic Wilms tumor. However, the decrease in relapse rate came at the cost of increased toxicity.

“The study was impactful because it established the activity of vincristine/irinotecan against Wilms tumor. Based on these findings, this chemotherapy combination will be applied more broadly in the treatment of Wilms tumor,” Dr. Dome added.

proton center

Johns Hopkins Proton Therapy Center opens in collaboration with Children’s National

proton center

The Center at Sibley offers state-of-the-art, pencil beam proton therapy equipment, as well as next-generation imaging technologies such as dual energy CT-guided treatment that reduces the range of error, and the latest innovation in biomatrix magnetic resonance imaging designed to target moving tumors in organs like the lung and liver.

Pediatric cancer patients in the Greater Washington region now have access to one of the most advanced, lifesaving proton therapy technologies offered in the U.S. The Johns Hopkins Proton Therapy Center opened Oct.28, 2019, at Sibley Memorial Hospital in collaboration with Children’s National Hospital.

The proton collaboration with Children’s National expands an existing collaboration between Children’s National and Johns Hopkins Medicine that established the pediatric radiation oncology program at Sibley, which treats a wide range of children’s cancer. Now, Sibley will offer the only proton center in the Washington D.C. region with a dedicated pediatric team, staff who are trained in pediatrics instead of adult providers who also treat children.

“This collaboration allows us to bring the latest technology to the region and offer the most advanced cancer treatment to help children live better lives,” says Kurt Newman, M.D., president and CEO at Children’s National. “As one of the Top 10 children’s hospitals in the nation, our goal is to ensure that patients and families are receiving the best care possible.”

The Center at Sibley offers state-of-the-art, pencil beam proton therapy equipment, as well as next-generation imaging technologies such as dual energy CT-guided treatment that reduces the range of error, and the latest innovation in biomatrix magnetic resonance imaging designed to target moving tumors in organs like the lung and liver. A large mechanical arm called a gantry can move the beam 360 degrees around the patient, treating the tumor from several angles as it destroys tumor cells layer by layer.

“Proton therapy is an advanced technology that allows radiation to be delivered precisely to cancer tissue,” says Jeffrey Dome, M.D., Ph.D., vice president for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s National. “This provides a significant advantage compared with conventional radiation therapy, especially in children, where sparing the healthy tissue that surrounds the tumor may be critical for normal growth and development. Proton therapy shows great promise to reduce long-term side effects of radiation treatment.”

The Center at Sibley will have a fully integrated research room, which will allow clinical, basic science and medical physics faculty to advance clinical trial research, translational research and technology development research in proton therapy. Leading experts and oncologists will study proton outcomes for sarcoma, gynecological tumors, pancreatic and liver tumors, lymph node cancers and tumors located near the heart and major blood vessels, such as lung or breast cancers. In addition, the researchers will examine how the proton energy that kills cancer cells interacts with non-cancerous cells and tissue surrounding the tumors.

The JJohns Hopkins Proton Therapy Center opens in phases. The first treatment room opened October 2019. The second room is scheduled to open in spring 2020, and the third room and fixed beam research room are scheduled to open in fall 2020.