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Dr. Kurt Newman in front of the capitol building

Children’s National leaders provide expertise and support to advance SHIP-MD pediatric innovation initiative

Dr. Kurt Newman in front of the capitol building

“Having spent 30 years on the frontlines of pediatric healthcare as a surgeon, I saw so much innovation focused on adult medicine and not on pediatric populations. Instead, we were trying to adapt adult devices for use in children, which is not an effective solution,” says Dr. Newman.

The advancement of children’s medical devices in the U.S. continues to significantly lag behind adult devices for many reasons. A dedicated group of public and private sector healthcare leaders are working together to change that trend. In culmination of its first stage of work, the System of Hospitals for Innovation in Pediatrics – Medical Devices (SHIP-MD) initiative recently held a dynamic 3-day public workshop to further develop this groundbreaking public-private partnership, which is currently in its pre-consortium/conceptual phase.

Children’s National leaders and clinicians were among the pediatric healthcare experts who contributed to robust discussions about how to build and nurture a public-private partnership system that will safely accelerate the advancement of pediatric medical devices.

The workshop was developed and guided by a multi-stakeholder group including the Critical Path Institute (C-Path), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), AdvaMed, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and leaders of pediatric health systems.

Lee Beers

“We must strive to improve medical devices for children, which historically lag five to 10 years behind adults. For many children, that can be a lifetime,” says Dr. Beers.

Reflecting its ongoing commitment to bridging the pediatric innovation gap, Children’s National Hospital experts co-led discussions throughout the program, which explored ways to improve children’s health by transforming the existing medical device ecosystem to stimulate investment and innovation in pediatric devices.

Children’s National Hospital President and CEO Kurt Newman, M.D., and Lee Beers, M.D., medical director for the Child Health Advocacy Institute at Children’s National Hospital served as opening session speakers, providing their insights into the current state of innovation in pediatric devices and why a new approach, such as SHIP-MD, is vitally needed.

“Having spent 30 years on the frontlines of pediatric healthcare as a surgeon, I saw so much innovation focused on adult medicine and not on pediatric populations. Instead, we were trying to adapt adult devices for use in children, which is not an effective solution,” says Dr. Newman. “Children’s National Hospital is proud to contribute to SHIP-MD’s pioneering efforts to address this critical disparity and reform pediatric device development in order to ensure that children, regardless of their age or condition, have access to the life-changing treatments and technologies they need to grow up stronger.”

An op-ed recently penned by Dr. Newman in STAT further explores the importance of public-private partnerships like SHIP-MD that are focused on fast-tracking innovation in medical devices for children.

Beers, who also serves as president of AAP, highlighted the fact that, as medical technology continues to advance, children are not reaping the benefits.

Kolaleh-Eskandanian

“Through the SHIP-MD initiative, we can work to ensure that the discipline of medical device development is equally understood and appreciated by its participating hospitals,” says Dr. Eskandanian.

“We must strive to improve medical devices for children, which historically lag five to 10 years behind adults. For many children, that can be a lifetime,” says Beers. “Much more needs to be done to address the countless hurdles that prohibit children from accessing the technology they need. The disproportionate rate of disease in minority children is another indicator that we must not cut corners as we look to improve pediatric innovation access.”

Kolaleh Eskandanian, Ph.D., M.B.A., P.M.P., vice president and chief innovation officer at Children’s National Hospital and principal investigator for the FDA-funded National Capital Consortium for Pediatric Device Innovation (NCC-PDI), co-led the Qualifying Hospital Criteria panel, which addressed the importance of expanding the SHIP-MD network to medical institutions that have the infrastructure for the safe conduct of research.

“Through the SHIP-MD initiative, we can work to ensure that the discipline of medical device development is equally understood and appreciated by its participating hospitals. As champions of pediatric innovation, we must work to provide equitable access to device trials for every patient that qualifies,” says Eskandanian. “The goal of the Qualifying Hospital Criteria group is to introduce criteria that hospitals must meet in order to provide a safe environment to conduct pediatric medical device research and trials.”

Co-leading the Regulatory panel was Francesca Joseph, M.D., FAAP, a pediatrician at Children’s National Hospital and co-investigator for NCC-PDI. This workshop explored opportunities to address regulatory needs by refining current processes and considering new options to promote advancement of pediatric medical devices.

Francesca Joseph

Co-leading the Regulatory panel was Dr. Francesca Joseph, a pediatrician at Children’s National Hospital and co-investigator for NCC-PDI.

In the closing session, Eskandanian and other panel experts recapped the workshop and discussed core factors that will help determine whether or not SHIP-MD’s network is prepared to enter Phase II, the consortium phase. This phase includes the development of a strategic plan that incorporates the short, medium and long-term goals needed to create and implement the framework enabling the official launch of SHIP-MD.

During his talk, Dr. Newman also shared the strategic steps being taken by Children’s National that complement the SHIP-MD initiative in advancing pediatric device innovation. Among these is the creation of the Children’s National Research & Innovation Campus (CNRIC), the first-of-its-kind pediatric research and innovation hub located in Washington, D.C., which includes on-site partners JLABS, Johnson & Johnson Innovation’s life science incubator, and Virginia Tech University. The campus will nurture a rich ecosystem for pediatric innovation in the nation’s capital.

Doctors-working-with-Digital-Tablet

New network will advance treatments for children

Doctors-working-with-Digital-Tablet

Three leaders from Children’s National Health System are among the investigators of a new FDA-funded program created to launch a global clinical trials network. The initial $1 million grant from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) establishes a network among the Institute for Advanced Clinical Trials for Children (I-ACT for Children), the National Capital Consortium for Pediatric Device Innovation (NCC-PDI) (affiliated with Children’s National), PEDSnet, the James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence and the Critical Path Institute, to address the unmet medical needs of children by improving quality and efficiency in developing innovative pediatric drugs and devices.

Along with the fiscal 2017 funds, there is a potential for $1 million in funding each year for an additional four years to I-ACT for Children, contingent on annual appropriations and the availability of funding. I-ACT for Children is a new independent, nonprofit organization that works to improve the planning and completion of pediatric clinical trials. PEDSnet and the Anderson Center will serve as the network’s data and learning core, while the Critical Path Institute will serve as the regulatory science core and NCC-PDI will serve as the medical device core.

From Children’s National, the investigators include: Peter Kim, M.D., Ph.D., vice president of the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation; Kolaleh Eskandanian, Ph.D., executive director of the Sheikh Zayed Institute and NCC-PDI and Johannes van den Anker, M.D., Ph.D., division chief of Clinical Pharmacology and vice chair of Experimental Therapeutics.

“We are pleased that this grant addresses innovative reengineering of the pediatric device trials system,” says Eskandanian. “In contrast with drug trials, device trials are generally less optimally understood in academic medical centers and clinical sites.”

She explains that children have medical device needs that are considerably different from adults. Designing devices for children requires considerations such as growth and development, anatomical and physiological differences. Often, the lack of available devices for children forces clinicians to use an adult device off-label or to improvise. Off-label use may be the only option, but such use can bring risks of serious adverse events that could be avoided if there were more FDA–approved pediatric devices.

“Thanks to partnership with I-ACT we will be able to address the pressing need to improve clinical trials and post-market monitoring of pediatric devices,” says Eskandanian.

Leading the network as principal investigator is Edward Connor, M.D., president of I-ACT for Children and an emeritus professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology, Immunology, and Tropical Medicine at George Washington University School of Medicine and Children’s National.

Work has been initiated to integrate network components and engage public and private shareholders. Next steps include selecting priority projects for implementation in 2018 and beyond, and scaling the network in North America and abroad.

Funding for this work was made possible, in part, by the Food and Drug Administration through grant 1 U18 FD 006297. Views expressed in written materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does any mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organization imply endorsement by the United States Government.