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Preemie Baby

Optimizing pediatric quality & safety in the NICU

Preemie Baby

Children’s National doctors are optimizing pediatric quality and safety by working to decrease the rate of hypothermia in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Jessica Cronin, M.D., an anesthesiologist at Children’s National Health System, is working closely with staff and researchers to optimize pediatric quality and safety at the hospital. One of the projects Dr. Cronin is assisting with helps some of the smallest and most vulnerable patients that need surgery. Specifically, she is working to decrease the rate of hypothermia in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

“It’s a significant problem that children may become cold during the surgery and immediately afterwards,” said Dr. Cronin. “There are a number of complications associated with that occurrence and our doctors and researchers are looking for solutions to combat that issue,” she added.

The hospital staff has instituted several interventions by making data available to the anesthesiologists responsible for temperature management and receiving feedback every month on the types of incidences that are happening. From when a baby is in the NICU, moved to the operating room and when they get transferred back, the doctors at Children’s National have created a checklist of tools to keep babies warm and monitor their temperatures during the perioperative period.

The NICU team has also worked closely with Dr. Rana Hamdy, M.P.H., M.S.C.E., who leads the antimicrobial stewardship team, Sudeepta Basu, M.D., a board certified neonatologist at Children’s National, and the pharmacy team to decrease out antibiotic utilization rates. To achieve its goals, the hospital has implemented the use of real-time check-ins during rounds, new algorithms, de-escalation of antibiotics and the frequent auditing has significantly reduced the unnecessary use of vancomycin.

This project is currently being tested in other parts of the hospital. Furthermore, the Children’s National team recently won an award from the District of Columbia Hospital Association (DCHA) to develop and implement interventions including clinical practice guidelines, educational initiatives, pharmacy-initiated prompts on rounds to de-escalate or discontinue vancomycin review from the antimicrobial stewardship team and provide documentation of culture volumes.

The DCHA serves as the unifying voice working to advance hospitals and health systems in D.C to strengthen systems of care, preserve access and promote better health outcomes for patients and communities. The Children’s National NICU team has been recognized for their outstanding work.

“The work that Dr. Cronin and the rest of the anesthesia team are performing is outstanding,” said Lamia Soghier, M.D., F.A.A.P., C.H.S.E., neonatologist and medical director of the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Children’s National. “Our doctors have cut our rates of hypothermia for postoperative NICU infants by 60% and this project marks one of our major successes!”

Fewer than 60% of young women diagnosed with STIs in emergency departments fill scripts

Fewer than 60% of young women diagnosed with sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the emergency department fill prescriptions for antimicrobial therapy to treat these conditions, according to a research letter published online May 28, 2019, by JAMA Pediatrics.

Adolescents make up nearly half of the people diagnosed with sexually transmitted infections each year. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, untreated sexually transmitted diseases in women can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), an infection of the reproductive organs that can complicate getting pregnant in the future.

“We were astonished to find that teenagers’ rates of filling STI prescriptions were so low,” says Monika K. Goyal, M.D., MSCE, assistant chief of Children’s Division of Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services and the study’s senior author. “Our findings demonstrate the imperative need to identify innovative methods to improve treatment adherence for this high-risk population.”

The retrospective cohort study, conducted at two emergency departments affiliated with a large, urban, tertiary care children’s hospital, enrolled adolescents aged 13 to 19 who were prescribed antimicrobial treatment from Jan. 1, 2016, to Dec. 31, 2017, after being diagnosed with PID or testing positive for chlamydia.

Of 696 emergency department visits for diagnosed STIs, 208 teenagers received outpatient prescriptions for antimicrobial treatments. Only 54.1% of those prescriptions were filled.

“Teenagers may face a number of hurdles when it comes to STI treatment, including out-of-pocket cost, access to transportation and confidentiality concerns,” Dr. Goyal adds.

Future studies will attempt to identify barriers to filling prescriptions in order to inform development of targeted interventions based in the emergency department that promote adherence to STI treatment.

In addition to Dr. Goyal, study co-authors include Lead Author, Alexandra Lieberman, BA, The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences; and co-authors Gia M. Badolato, MPH, and Jennifer Tran, PA-C, MPH, both of Children’s National.