Children's National Hospital

Safety at every level: a cultural transformation

Children's National Hospital

In early December, Children’s National Quality & Safety leadership team led participants through the hospital’s high-reliablility journey and actionable tools at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement National Forum in Orlando, Fla.

In early December 2019, leadership from Children’s National Hospital quality and safety team attended and presented at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement National Forum in Orlando, Fla. The presentation, titled Safety at Every Level: A Cultural Transformation, provided attendees with an overview of Children’s National Hospital’s high reliability journey and actionable tools they could use to improve quality and safety.

Rahul Shah, M.D., MBA., vice president and chief quality and safety officer, Lisbeth Fahey, MSN, RN., executive director of quality and safety, Kavita Parikh, M.D., MSHS, pediatric hospitalist, and Kathryn Merkeley, MHSA, RN, director of patient safety, led the participants through each step of our journey, highlighting where the organization started, key steps in the process and lessons learned along the way.

The presentation demonstrated the integration of safety tools such as error prevention training, safety briefings, safety event reporting, cause analysis, safety culture measurement and transparency with high reliability principles to produce tangible gains in safety, quality and organizational culture. Dr. Shah emphasized the overarching theme of continuous learning and iterative change that is needed to be successful with this type of work.

“We’re always learning and looking to make things better by benchmarking our work against other pediatric organizations,” Dr. Shah said. “It’s important to ensure that we use the best practices to make sure we have the latest, best and most-evidence based practices to remain a top performing pediatric hospital.”

In a pediatric setting, safety is the keystone for performance excellence. As organizations work toward becoming high-reliability organizations they become more sensitive to operations, committed to resilience and are more reluctant to simplify their observations. Through implementing these tools and continually evaluating and learning, Children’s National was able to institute the evolution of a new safety culture by being more systematic, proactive and generative.

“Our goal was to provide the audience with tools they could use on their own journey to high-reliability,” said Merkeley. “We not only wanted to share our successes in creating positive culture change, but also the many lessons we’ve learned along the way and the desire to always be learning and improving.”