Entries by Nicole Kresge

Addressing MB-CLABSI through innovation – and dedication – to pediatric safety

With mucosal barrier central line-associated blood stream infections (MB-CLABSI) posing a serious risk to cancer and other immunocompromised patients, Children’s National Health System was intent on finding a way to prevent them. Through a focused initiative, the hospital experienced great success, cutting infection rates by more than half. This was a daunting proposition. Historically MB-CLABSI […]

Assessing the global burden of rheumatic heart disease

Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is the most commonly acquired heart disease in young people under the age of 25. It’s caused by untreated streptococcal throat infections that progress into acute rheumatic fever and eventually weaken the valves of the heart. Fortunately, the devastating condition, which was endemic in the United States before 1950, is now relatively […]

Namaste: how mindfulness aids cardiac patients

An estimated 30 to 50 percent of teens with congenital heart conditions will experience anxiety and/or depression disorders, but researchers at Children’s National Health System have found that mindfulness techniques such as yoga, meditation and peer support can reduce stress that is often associated with these debilitating conditions. Published in the journal Pediatric Cardiology, the first-of-its-kind, […]

White children more likely to receive unnecessary antibiotics in ED

Infections now considered relatively easy to treat, including some forms of diarrhea and pneumonia, were the leading cause of death throughout the developed world until the 20th century. Then, scientists developed what eventually turned into a miracle cure: Antibiotics that could kill or thwart the growth of a broad array of bacterial species. Although antibiotics […]

The Red Badge Project: expediting ED care

Transplant procedures leave cancer patients with compromised immune systems, leading many to develop life-threatening fevers or other complications. In particular, neutropenia, or abnormally low levels of white blood cells that are critical to fighting off infections, is prevalent among this population. Fever with neutropenia can be fatal. As part of the Children’s National Health System […]

European workgroup creates recommendations for CCHD pulse oximetry screening

The European Pulse Oximetry Screening Workgroup recently published recommendations for the use and standardization of pulse oximetry screening for critical congenital heart defects in newborns. Children’s National Medical Director of Global Services Gerard R. Martin, M.D., was among the experts that compiled the recommendations. Approximately 1 in 500 babies is born with a critical congenital heart […]

Mitochondria key for repairing cell damage in DMD

What’s known Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), one of the most severe forms of muscular dystrophy, is caused by a defect in the dystrophin gene. The protein that this gene encodes is responsible for anchoring muscle cells’ inner frameworks, or cytoskeletons, to proteins and other molecules outside these cells, the extracellular matrix. Without functional dystrophin protein, […]

Understanding the long-term consequences of prematurity

Premature birth, a condition that affects approximately 10 percent of births in the United States, often is accompanied by health problems ranging from difficulties breathing and eating to long-term neurocognitive delays and disabilities. However, the reasons for these problems have been unclear. In a study published online Aug. 15, 2017 in Scientific Reports, a team […]

Giving voice to adult osteogenesis imperfecta patients

With the influx of increasingly effective technology at our fingertips, the landscape of patient care for complex diseases has changed for the better in recent years. Doctors and researchers can accelerate new discoveries and improvements in patient care by querying and utilizing patient data gathered from all over the world. For Laura L. Tosi, M.D., […]

Building resilient kids through healthy adults

Exposures to adverse childhood experiences are the single biggest predictor of outcomes for physical health, mental health, social functioning and academic achievement in children and into adulthood. There is evidence that negative experiences – such as poverty, housing insecurity, having a parent with untreated mental illness or actively engaged in substance abuse – have biological […]

Daily tasks harder for girls with ASD

Researchers at the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at Children’s National found something surprising in their recent study of executive function and adaptive skills. Girls, who often score well on direct assessments of communication skills, struggle more than boys with crucial tasks such as making a plan, getting organized and following through, as well as […]

A closer look at the placenta to predict FGR

Early in development, cells from the fertilized egg form the placenta, a temporary organ that serves as an interface between the mother and her growing offspring. When things go right, as occurs in the vast majority of pregnancies, the placenta properly delivers nutrients from the mother’s diet and oxygen from the air she breathes to […]

Lab led by Zhe Han, Ph.D., receives $1.75 million from NIH

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded $1.75 million to a research lab led by Zhe Han, Ph.D., principal investigator and associate professor in the Center for Genetic Medicine Research, in order to build models of congenital heart disease (CHD) that are tailored to the unique genetic sequences of individual patients. Han was the […]

Defining cardiovascular disease and diabetes risks in kids

For more than a decade and a half, researchers and clinicians have used the term “metabolic syndrome” (MetS) to describe a set of symptoms that can raise the risk of cardiovascular disease. Although this constellation of factors has proven to be a good predictor of cardiometabolic risk in adults, it has not been as useful […]

Losing sleep: Severe obstructive sleep apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) often starts with a snore that sounds harmless enough. But over time, explains Sasikumar Kilaikode, M.D., a pediatric pulmonary fellow in the Division of Pulmonary Care at Children’s National Health System, this condition can lead to serious health consequences. OSA, caused when the airway becomes periodically blocked during sleep, has a […]

Children’s National Chief of Allergy and Immunology helps move gene therapy forward

On July 12, 2017, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory committee unanimously expressed its support for CTL019 – a pediatric cancer T-cell therapy. If the FDA follows the advice from the 10-member Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee (ODAC) – which included Children’s National Health System’s Catherine Bollard, M.D., MBChB, Chief of the Division of Allergy and […]

Spectral data shine light on placenta

The placenta serves as an essential intermediary between a pregnant mother and her developing fetus, transporting in life-sustaining oxygen and nutrients, ferrying out waste and serving as interim lungs, kidneys and liver as those vital organs develop in utero. While the placenta plays a vital role in supporting normal pregnancies, it remains largely a black […]