Entries by Nicole Kresge

Assessing the risk factors in rheumatic heart disease

Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is the most commonly acquired cardiovascular disease in children and young adults. The devastating condition, which was endemic in the United States before 1950, is now relatively rare in the developed world due to social and economic development and the introduction of penicillin. But, in the developing world RHD remains nearly […]

The effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on white matter development

Mortality rates for infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) have dramatically decreased over the past two decades, with more and more children reaching adulthood. However, many survivors are at risk for neurodevelopmental abnormalities resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass surgery (CPB), including long-term injuries to the brain’s white matter and neural connectivity impairments that can lead […]

Tracking preemies’ blood flow to monitor brain maturation

Blood is the conduit through which our cells receive much of what they need to grow and thrive. The nutrients and oxygen that cells require are transported by this liquid messenger. Getting adequate blood flow is especially important during the rapid growth of gestation and early childhood – particularly for the brain, the weight of […]

William D. Gaillard, M.D., elected Second Vice President of the American Epilepsy Society

William Davis Gaillard, M.D., has been elected second vice president of the American Epilepsy Society (AES), a medical and scientific society with 4,000 members. Dr. Gaillard’s term started at the end of the society’s annual meeting, December 1-5, in Washington, D.C. “The AES is the largest multidisciplinary professional and scientific society dedicated to the understanding, treatment […]

When a common cold may trigger early supportive care

Human rhinovirus (HRV), the culprit behind most colds, is the leading cause of hospitalization for premature babies. However, in very preterm children, exactly how HRV causes severe respiratory disease – and which patients may need more intensive observation and treatment – is less well understood. A new study led by Children’s National Health System research-clinicians […]

Facial analysis technology successfully used to identify Noonan syndrome in diverse populations

According to an international study led by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), researchers have successfully used facial analysis software, developed by the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation at Children’s National, to identify Noonan syndrome in diverse populations. Noonan syndrome is relatively common, affecting between 1 in 1,000 to 1 in 2,500 […]

Landmark CDC report finds easy, painless test decreases infant cardiac deaths by 33 percent

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect, affecting approximately eight out of every 1,000 babies born in the United States. The most severe cases, critical congenital heart disease (CCHD), affect three in every 1,000 babies. Just a few years ago, many of these seemingly healthy infants were discharged from the hospital only […]

Research led by Zhe Han featured cover of JASN, leading kidney disease journal

Coenzyme Q10, one of the best-selling nutrient supplements to support heart health also could be beneficial for kidney health, according to research conducted in transgenic fruit flies that was led by Zhe Han, Ph.D., associate professor at Children’s Center for Cancer and Immunology Research. Nephrocytes, filtration kidney cells in Drosophila, require the Coq2 gene for protein reabsorption, toxin […]

Long-term glucocorticoids help patients with DMD

There is currently no cure for the devastating, progressive neuromuscular disease known as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). But clinics that treat patients with this disease have long relied on a class of steroid hormone medications, known as glucocorticoids, to ease its symptoms. Over weeks and months, these drugs help preserve muscle strength and function. Though […]

Congratulations to Dorothy Bulas, M.D. – 2017 RSNA Outstanding Educator recipient

Dorothy Bulas, M.D., section head of ultrasound and fetal imaging at Children’s National Health System, was honored with the RSNA 2017 Outstanding Educator award at the Radiological Society of North America’s (RSNA) Annual Meeting, held November 26 – December 1 in Chicago, Illinois. The winner of the award is selected annually by the RSNA Board […]

Liquid biopsy spots aggressive brainstem cancer earlier

A highly aggressive pediatric brain cancer can be spotted earlier and reliably by the genetic fragments it leaves in biofluids, according to a study presented by Children’s National Health System researchers at the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) 2017 Annual Meeting. The findings may open the door to non-surgical biopsies and a new way to tell […]

Using IR imaging to improve lead apron inspection

Workers inspecting the lead aprons that shield patients from radiation during imaging tend to use tactile and visual inspections to find defects, running their fingers over the aprons since fingertips can detect even subtle changes to a surface. Yet findings from a new study could influence changes in this approach to improve inspection performance and […]

Combined FACT accreditation related to cellular immunotherapy spotlights Children’s ongoing commitment to revolutionary cancer therapies

As new immunotherapy treatments are starting to hit the market, care-delivery must adapt so that facilities are prepared to deliver these novel treatments to patients. Children’s National is proud to announce that it became the first pediatric medical institution in the United States to receive accreditations for both immune effector cells and more than minimal […]

Advancing cures for pediatric cancer: Highlights from leading Children’s National experts at SIOP 2017

In mid-October 2017, nearly 2,000 clinicians, scientists, nurses, health care professionals and cancer patients and survivors gathered in Washington, D.C., for SIOP 2017, the Annual Congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology. For four days, attendees heard from world-renowned experts while exchanging ideas and information, all in the name of advancing cures for childhood […]

The 38th Annual Telly Awards recognizes a Children’s National documentary

The “Play Smart, Your Brain Matters” documentary was recently recognized at the 38th Annual Telly Awards, which honors excellence in video and television across all screens. In light of the Athletic Concussion Protection Act of 2011, the documentary was created as a training tool for the Concussion Care and Evaluation Training Program, funded by the […]

Working to reduce brain injury in newborns

Research-clinicians at Children’s National Health System and Drexel University College of Medicine led the first study to identify a promising treatment to reduce or prevent brain injury in newborns who have suffered hypoxia-ischemia, a serious complication in which restricted blood flow deprives the brain of oxygen. Consequences of brain injury resulting from oxygen deprivation affect […]

Children’s National to host PCICS

On December 6-8, Children’s National Health System will host the 13th Annual International Meeting of the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Society (PCICS) in Washington, D.C. Chaired by Darren Klugman, M.D., Medical Director of the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit at Children’s National, and Melissa B. Jones, CPNP-AC, cardiac critical care nurse practitioner at Children’s National, the conference […]

Imaging captures obesity’s impact on the adolescent brain

Obesity affects the whole body, from more obvious physical impacts on bones and joints to more subtle, internal impacts on organs like the brain. For the first time, a team of researchers has used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to capture the brain function of a small population of adolescents with obesity, both before and […]

Continuous EEG monitoring better predicts HIE outcomes

For newborns who experience a serious complication that deprives their brain of oxygen, continuously monitoring brain activity and examining how the electrical signals evolve may be a more reliable way to identify infants most at risk for brain injury, compared with doing evaluations at discreet intervals, according to a prospective cohort study led by Children’s […]